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I'm not the expert but here in my humble opinion

1. rifle and ammo price.
10/22 mag cost a lot more than 10/22 lr rifle. then the 22wmr ammo cost more than most plinker can stomach.

2. 22WMR advantage . most 22LR shooter don't think the WMR offer that much of advantage for what a 22LR usually shoot for (small animal , plinking etc)

3. 10/22 Magnum uses the same blowback design . but 10/22Mag has to use steel bolt that is twice as heavy and rumored (i can confirm) to have more QC problems.


again i'm no expert
 

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I've always wondered why they stop making it as well, but I guess I could always get a CZ 512 (or some other pricier brand like the VQ one) if I really wanted one. Think, as mentioned above, WMR is one of those middle ground calibers and that demand is low because people either stick with LR or skip up to the .223, so, while I am interested in one, I can see why demand might be a reason. Still, I would have thought they would keep it and the .44 magnum as well, but, then again, I would love for them to make a .357 magnum version even more than both, lol

I still wonder if there was a mechanical reason, though, as other semi-autos exist.
 

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It can't be the price of the ammo, folks are still buying the "other" semi auto 22 mags., like the Rem. 597M that i have.

My 597M is quite accurate and unlike the Ruger it doesn't have ejector and other parts flying out of it.

Those Rugers had some problems, like all the Ruger shotguns they also quit makeing!

DM
 

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The official answer from Ruger was lackluster sales. It was manufactured for 9 years and only about 50,000 units sold. Compare this to over 5,000,000 sold of the 22 LR version.

Then there is the other assumed answer that the 22WMR was discontinued due to extraction issues and breaking bolts. We'll never know for certain most likely.
 

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Bolt Mass

I have no experience with the 10/22M, but I believe there was an inherent design problem. For blow back actions, the mass of the bolt is what gets the job done and I don't think Ruger could get enough weight in there. Calculations show the bolt mass needs to be close to one pound for the .22 magnum cartridge.
Some designers make the error of thinking heavier spring pressure through heavier or numerous springs will compensate, but that doesn't work.
Regards, Ray
 

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It can't be the price of the ammo, folks are still buying the "other" semi auto 22 mags., like the Rem. 597M that i have.

My 597M is quite accurate and unlike the Ruger it doesn't have ejector and other parts flying out of it.

Those Rugers had some problems, like all the Ruger shotguns they also quit makeing!

DM
Never had any such issues with mine. Just minor extraction failure on occasion.
 

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Decade old thread, opinions and thoughts probably changed. Honestly the market in the rear view still thinks the ruger is 3x-4x the value.

To answer a decades old question, ruger claimed it was a liability issue stemming from bolt issues. There was also widespread speculation they felt the hmr conversion was unsafe and didn't want to provide a platform for lawsuits. The bolt was tungsten, expensive and occasionally brittle. After a year or so they were offering 77/22s as a replacement for mags, much to the chagrin of some owners.

Gotta love the necroposts
 

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This is my understanding. In the beginning, the 10/22 Magnum, what's fitted with only one extractor. Due to lack of cleaning a lot of customers had failure to eject problems. They would send them back to Ruger, who would then clean them and send them back. After a lot of this going on, they decided they would put another, let's call it a device. They called it another extractor. In doing so, they created a very very, thin rib on the tungsten Bolt. This rib would break off, and create the mother of all jams, between a bolt and receiver. Has been common knowledge on this forum that if you have one of those to quote extractors, that you should remove the inner one. That's why they quit making them.
 

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This is my understanding. In the beginning, the 10/22 Magnum, what's fitted with only one extractor. Due to lack of cleaning a lot of customers had failure to eject problems. They would send them back to Ruger, who would then clean them and send them back. After a lot of this going on, they decided they would put another, let's call it a device. They called it another extractor. In doing so, they created a very very, thin rib on the tungsten Bolt. This rib would break off, and create the mother of all jams, between a bolt and receiver. Has been common knowledge on this forum that if you have one of those to quote extractors, that you should remove the inner one. That's why they quit making them.
And I learned more yet again!

No old thread is bad if people garner info from it being resurrected!
 

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Bolt Mass

I have no experience with the 10/22M, but I believe there was an inherent design problem. For blow back actions, the mass of the bolt is what gets the job done and I don't think Ruger could get enough weight in there. Calculations show the bolt mass needs to be close to one pound for the .22 magnum cartridge.
Some designers make the error of thinking heavier spring pressure through heavier or numerous springs will compensate, but that doesn't work.
Regards, Ray
The one and only 10/22 Mag i have worked on had a bolt with single extractor and the bolt weight was 16.3 oz's , this was a fantastic shooting rifle and i would like to own one myself like this one.
 
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