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Savage B22 Precision
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Who wears prescription glasses? Do you use your glasses? Any style glass frames that work best for you?
I need to get an exam soon...I've taken my glasses on and come trying to figure out getting a good sight thru the scope.
Granted I am a newb here, recently found out about every scope has a distance from the eye it is supposed to work best at.

Still after having glasses for the last 10 years with bifocals it was tough for me to adjust. contact lenses didn't work for me. Any advice on the subject is appreciated.
Here is a photo of me shooting in support position, or trying at least...notice my glasses on the ground.
Machine gun Air gun Military camouflage Plant Marines
 

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Great question. I have bi-focals and using them is necessary and annoying. Without them I have to adjust my scopes out of whack then I cant read anything at the bench. Cheap drugstore glasses improve things a little, but not enough to feel like a viable option.
 

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My prescription glasses only have a corrective lense in the side with astigmatism, which happens to be my dominant eye. I can't shoot well behind a scope without them. Since I don't need them for most other tasks, I leave them in a case in my range bag.

If you can't adjust the focus to your vision with glasses, you may need different glasses.
 

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I wear progressive bifocals and I do wear them when shooting. All of My scopes have AO this allows me to keep the crosshairs in focus and use the AO to clear the target picture. But by doing this I can’t just turn it to 50 yds and be good. So I turn it to the distance I’m shooting and tweak it till it is clear. Usually slightly less right on. Does that make sense? for a tip maybe get a cheek riser to help with consistent cheek/eye placement. Good luck and welcome to the addiction.
 

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I have fairly bad vision, glasses for reading and distance, also hane an astigmatism in both eyes (red dots look like star bursts). I just wear my distance glasses to shoot, a pair of prescription sunglasses with polycarbonate lenses.
 

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I had cataract surgery and monofocal iol implants for distance only a couple of years ago and wear prescription glass lens bifocals or cheap polycarbonate bifocal reader sunglasses, no power top/reader lower on both, and have no issues with scopes. I can relate to what Currahee506 stated when I use the parallax adjustment on any of my SF or AO scopes.
 

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A quality scope is a corrective optical lens system.
It adjusts the focal point to the eye, with glasses or without.
Adjust the objective for a clear, stable image...adjust the retical for clear, sharp crosshairs.
I can't see the big 8 at the top of the eye chart without my specs. ;)
But with my 8x32-44 Mueller, I can see 17 caliber holes at 200 yards, no problem.
 

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I used to wear progressive bifocals and focused my scopes with my glasses on. Thanks to modern medical science I no longer need them and had to refocus some scopes. I see no difference between the two as long as the scope is focused for your eye.
 

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Having seen a few out-of-battery kabooms along with head separations in centerfires and ricochets coming straight back from the target line, it always saddens me to see people shooting without eye protection.

I have been wearing bifocals for probably 30 years and shoot scopes and iron sights both, usually 2-3 times a week . Never had a problem being able to see through the scope. I'm 81 now and have to use an adjustable rear aperture when shooting iron sights. If you cant see to shoot with your present glasses, maybe you need a trip to your optomitrist.
 

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If you really want to study the subject of eye issues and shooting requirements it can get complicated quickly. I have always worn glasses for distance and coupled with an astigmatism it gets ugly. Here is the worst part, you need to find an eye care professional who REALLY understands the needs of shooters and this isn't easy. There was once several eye care professionals that understood our requirements, but not so many today, in fact very few. Do some research and look up the name Dr. Norman Wong. He was an eye care specialist who was also a skilled US Navy pistol shooter. He has written several articles about shooting and eyesight issues, but I don't believe he is in practice anymore. His articles can be quite helpful.

I had to wear special glasses for shooting for years and have a frame that allows lens interchangeability. One lens for iron sight pistols, one for iron sight rifles, one for scopes and one for red dots. My astigmatism skewed everything. It took quite a while to figure out all my requirements and I was happy with the results, but things changed dramatically a couple of months ago when I had cataract surgery and a lens implant. Now I am going through the entire procedure once again trying to figure out what lenses work best for my needs. This is a difficult process if you are a perfectionist. My optometrist understands the needs of shooters and he is the only one I have ever found that will go the extra mile in making my corrective lenses. I will be in trouble if/when he retires. He also told me there is a movement in the shooting sports arena to make ANSI (?) certified frames and lenses mandatory at shooting ranges. I knew this was coming, but hoped not for a while yet. My frames are not ANSI certified because the lenses are interchangeable. I should add that my shooting glass frames sit much higher on my face than regular glasses do so I am not looking around/thru the frame. They feel and look odd at first but form follows function.

Unfortunately in finding the right combination of corrective lenses it becomes somewhat of a trial and error method. What may sound good at first may not work the way you want it to on the range. And just because you can see okay at 100 yards doesn't mean a lens will work properly at 300 yards or more. One really needs to check around your area and try to find eye care professionals that understand shooting requirements and will work with you to determine your needs. Not an easy task anymore and getting more difficult by the day. Not many eye care people want you bringing firearms into their establishments, but there are ways to work around this. I usually go into my optometrist very early in the morning before anyone else arrives so he can do his thing with me.

Rick H.
 

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RFC Consigliere & Concierge
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I wear progressive no line bifocals...

I tried many types of glasses with varying degrees of success. Then I met an optometrist who shoots, and got great advice.

So- when I get serious about shooting, like shooting NRA smallbore silhouette, I wear daily wear disposable contact lenses. Looking through a scope often makes one look through the corner of your eyeglass lenses. The corners are the thickest in most cases (myopia), and have the most image distortion from spherical aberration.
Wearing contact lenses, the center of the lens in your eye, the contact lens, and scope lenses are in repeatable alignment.

The only problem I have when I do wear my shooting contacts is difficulty reading fine print, which is easily remedied with a pair of inexpensive 2X reading glasses.

Drg
 

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Hi Gary, agreeing with others here. Always wear some form of eye protection when shooting whether they're prescription eyeglasses or just protective polycarbonate safety glasses.

I've been wearing glasses since I was 8 and they've come a long way from the old black plastic frames and coke bottle glass lenses of the 60's. It costs extra but I love titanium frames. They're light and highly abuse resistant. Hard coated high refractive index polycarbonate is nice too. I have a strong prescription and the lens are still relatively thin and light.

At 67 my lenses are now progressive (multifocal) and I love them. The hardest part is keeping the oils and smears cleaned off of them for a clear view. I do wear them when using a scope for several reasons besides safety. Mainly so my shooting buddies can take a turn and not have to do major adjustments to the scope focus. Same with me taking a turn with someone else's setup.

The more you wear them the quickly they'll disappear from your thoughts.

Frank
 

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Many years ago i used to shoot a lot of long range rifle.
I too wear progressive lenses 100% of the time

Please don't take this as a criticism....only as a suggestion.
I spent a long time setting up the placement of my rifle scope on the rifle, not only for and aft but also height for a natural point of aim. what that means is i could get behind my rifle with my eyes closed and when i open them i see perfectly through the scope just about every time..with the rifle in line with my body and my head and neck vertical, not canted.

Only then do i adjust cant of the rifle scope reticle.

I do not subscribe to the suggestion the scope should be as low to the barrel as possible....the mathematical corrections/calculations/DOPE take care of all of that.

i hope that helps...i think it will.
 

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RFC Consigliere & Concierge
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I do not subscribe to the suggestion the scope should be as low to the barrel as possible....the mathematical corrections/calculations/DOPE take care of all of that.
I agree on this^^^ about scope height.

I had an uncle who used to beat into my head that I had to get all of my scopes as low/close to the bore axis as physically possible.

Learning to shoot NRA smallbore silhouette quickly disabused me of that fallacious assertion.

Case in point, here are pics of the most consistently accurate and best tracking rifle in my safe:
Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun Line
Wood Musical instrument Trigger Air gun Revolver


And my Daystate Regal XL PCP, which I use for backyard silhouette practice:

Air gun Wood Trigger Shotgun Gun barrel

Wood Trigger Hardwood Musical instrument Wood stain


DrGunner
 
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