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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello folks,

After trawling the web for a few weeks I have yet to find an answer to aide my final decision. I have found many comments, none overly convincing either way.

I am looking to restock my Win 52D in a target stock and my question is this;

Irrespective of stock design/shape, if the action is correctly pillar bedded and the barrel floated, what is the better material? Full wood, laminate, or "something other than wood".

I have read that wood "soaks up" the vibration of firing better then the others, but is susceptible to movement. (I don't see how this is an issue if it is bedded and floated.)

I have read that laminates are very stable, and heavy, but offer the same as a full wood stock. (comes down to a personal preferance)

I have read that other materials can be better or worse than the two above depending on their quality. (some standard items from the original firearm manufacturers being likened to licorice)

I have only owned long arms with "wooded" stocks, as much from aesthetic choice as functionality.

What are you learned thoughts for someone who is not looking to take on the top level of competition, but at the same time values greatly the ability to be competitive?

I look forward to some interesting answers.

Nigel (indecisive Aussy)
 

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Its up to your taste! Theres a lot of BR shooters that use wood stocks, and if they are bedded and floated right they are very stabile as far as accuracy is concerned, it just takes a little more work and know how to get them to that point. The laminates makes a nice heavy bench gun, and are more stabile then regular wood, but needs to be treated like a wood stock for BR shooting. The high dollar fiberglass stocks like made by McMillan are a good platform to start from and takes probably the least amount of work when it comes to bedding and floating and inlet issues.
 

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No matter what you do to the wood stock, it will always be effected by temp and humidity changes. But through bedding and pillar bedding and floating, you can isolate the rifle from the effects of the changes in the wood.
 

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as far as accuracy goes there is NO difference once the stocks are set properly. wood does change BUT you never go a match and shoot cold turkey so there is always time to make adjustments or corrections if need be. i have a laminated wood stock on my BR gun and it's pillared and bedded. i have not had to tweek it in quite some time.
 

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they not into "sharing" over there. if thery know whats working they keep it to themselves or else sell it as a smith.
 

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It seems that there have been many theories about the material used for benchrest stocks. Wood went to fiberglass, to carbon-fiber, to laminate, and now it's coming back to wood.

There some discussions going on now about bedding; pillars/bolts, glue-in or a combination.

The components in rifle accuracy are constantly changing as shooters try new (old) materials and methods to get to the gun that works best for them!

Laminates are not necessarily heavy. Take a look at Don Stith's stocks.

It's been my experience that the Benchrest.com folks are very happy to answer questions and offer advise. There are a couple of "grumps" - but they are easy to ignore. Many of the shooters are at the 50/50 Nationals or shooting other matches this weekend. You should see some answers during the next week.

Best,
Michael
 

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when i shoot ARA i shoot with some of the best. i dont shoot agianst them (i aint that good yet). i see every type of stock material you can think of. from machined billet aluminum one piece stock for a Suhl to modded factory wood that was well very crude looking. those and everything in-between. pretty dont make it shoot. Joe Beshe (sp?) shoots the modded wood stock and is probly one of the top shooters in the country right now. everything the man has "looked" ugly but with him at the bolt they sure do shoot pretty. he's a lefty shooting a righty rifle too. it's about how to make the rifle shoot not what it's made of. once you get to that piont it is the driver and how well he can read conditions that determines the outcome. FWIW Joe gets fooled just like the rest of us on those conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the opinions guys,

I have decided to go with what I like and go down the path of bedding etc. Will research what sort once I have the stock.

In case your interested I have gone with Richards Microfit, one of their thumbhold target style stocks in grade AA fancy walnut.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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