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I heard that leaving wax on the barrel is good for accuracy, so I have been using only a dry Boresnake to clean out the powder residue and cruds. Should I run some solvents thorough it once in a while, and re-wax the barrel with fouling shots? What about in-between string cleaning?
 

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I don't detail clean untill the accuracy falls off. I only shoot match ammo and might go a couple k befor I really clean unless I have extraction probs. Then I only clean with a string line and patches.
 

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I guess I'm old school, I was taught to clean my rifles every time I shoot them. No fancy bore snakes, I go the whole deal, solvent, scrub, oil, everything. I guess it works alright, my Savage I was given 25 years ago still shoots great.
 

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I Was Raised

to not clean rimfire unless they fail to function or accuracy goes bad. I think this all came about from the mild steel they used to make RF barrels from.

I still hold with this. I do not clean until I need to and after I do, it usually takes about a box of ammo to get them shooting good again.

I have been using standard CF cleaning precedures for RF but I may change to a less severe method, maybe more solvents and nylon brushes instead of the bronze brushes I have always used. I have sometimes used a boresnake to drag excess lube out of the barrel and they do seem to clean quite well but then I still have to recondition the barrel with about a box of ammo.

oklahomaman.
 

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it depends

If all i did between cleanings was plink, then after 500 rounds or so i will clean( i use cheap ammo like wildcats or federal bulk). If i was hunting, and the weather was bad i clean it to prevent any kind of rust or moisture. Also if you wait till bad performance it could get difficult or time consuming, plus the gunk in the barrel can attract moisture. I am interested to see others posts, but i just dont see how fouling a barrel to the point of loss of accuracy is a good idea.
 

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I think it mainly comes down to is whether the cleanings do more damage than leaving the bores dirty.

Most people know squat about cleaning barrels and are about as gentle as a Soviet inquistitor. I'm of the opinion that an RF barrel is very unlikely to ever wear much if any from shooting alone and that the worn out RF barrels you see on old weapons were from cleaning, not shooting. This is the case with most older firearms. I used to look at old guns and their worn out barrels thinking 'Man, those people really did a lot of shooting back then' not really thinking about the fact that they were shooting corrosive ammo and had to clean after every session and the constant cleaning is what wore out the barrels, not bullets.

oklahomaman.
 

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I usually burn through 500-1000 rounds in a saturday, by then the magazines want to come apart for cleaning, so I do the barrel as well. Pull solvent wetted patches through with fishing line, then dry patches, then an oily patch or two. No brushes in the bore, but i do use a toothbrush to remove crud from the breech face and other problem areas.
 

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I clean the .22 (bolt-action) whenver I feel guilty enough about not cleaning it, which is about once every year or two. Since I don't shoot every weekend (or the .22 every tme) that's probably 2-5 bricks worth.

When I do clean, it's just a wet patch, brush a few times, wet patch, dry patch or two. While I'm at it I clean the bolt, etc. and re-grease it.

I do try to wipe down the outside with a silicone cloth whenever I put it in the safe.

The revolver I clean whenever the rounds stop dropping into the cylinders easily. That's usually every couple of boxes. Same drill as the rifle--wet patch, brush, wet patch, dry patch. It's had lead built-up above the forcing cone, and black on the face of the cylinder and inside the window for years. If it doesn't come off in 10 seconds or less with a nylon brush, it stays.
 

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I use a bore snake with some solvent on the brush. I use it every 200 rounds or so. The action comes apart between 500-1000 rounds. It just depends on the ammo being shot.

I think it would be very dificult to hurt a barrel using a bore snake.
 

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I guess I've kinda done a 180 degree turn on my cleaning activities. Forever almost, I wouldn't clean a .22 barrel until the accuracy went to hell & then just with a weedeater line pull-thru & dry patches. Lately, (last couple of months) I've been cleaning them pretty thoroughly after every 200-300 rounds & the guns seem to be shooting better if I keep them fairly clean. I use a one-piece stainless steel rod & a bronze brush dipped in Shooters Choice solvent then follow up with dry patches on the weedeater string until they come out clean. I know a lot of folks worry about using a bore brush but as soft as the steel in the barrels is it is still harder than a bronze brush........
 

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I guess I'm a glutton, because I try to clean after every time I go out. I usually pull the action completely apart and clean the bolt, trigger group and all the iddy-biddy parts. If all I've been shooting is target ammo I just pull dry patches through the barrel. If I plan on switching ammo it gets the solvent treatment and patches... I don't use brushes on the bores. JL
 

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JL?

You actually do a complete tear down EVERYTIME you shoot?

Man, I don't have time for all my stuff to start with, I'd never get to go! lol

On another forum I visit, a young man was talking about how he goes through and cleans EVERY ONE of his firearms completely EVERY month! I decided right there that he must only own a few firearms. I think most of the older shooters would have to spend a month straight of 8 hour days to even come close to cleaning everything! lol

oklahomaman.
 

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so, I'm curious, is there a right or wrong answer on this? or is it personal preference?

is there such a thing as too much cleaning?

it usually takes me about 6 hrs to clean everything after I go shooting. (that's 2-3 rifles and 2-3 pistols)
 

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Stratcat,

If your 25 year old Savage is still shooting well, you must be doing something right. :t

I'm of the "don't clean often" school for rimfire, though I do clean before they start malfunctioning, or losing accuracy. I like to use pull-throughs because I think there's less muzzle wear.

A while back I traded for a beautiful Winchester 62 (mfg. 1941). It had been cleaned regularly and has no rust, just slight bluing wear on sharp edges. It has a shiny bore.

It shoots around 2" at 25 yards. It turned out that the diligent owner must have cleaned it with a 3 piece aluminum rod from the muzzle end after every shooting session. On loking at the muzzle more closely I can see that the rifling toward the muzzle is worn very thin.

I don't mind, and feel I made out ok on the trade. The gun is beautiful and if I shoot it from my hind legs and don't rest it, I'm no more accurate than that anyway. ;)

Actually I haven't shot it since that one test firing 10 years ago. Too many guns, too little time.
 

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I clean the bore and bolt (bolt action) with solvent and patches after every shooting session, on the theory that the residue in the bore will attract and hold moisture, especially during our humid seasons. I use a bronze brush after 300-500 rounds. After cleaning, I run a bore mop with Birchwood-Casey Sheath on it. Before shooting again, I run a dry patch to wipe out the protectant.
 

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stratcat said:
so, I'm curious, is there a right or wrong answer on this? or is it personal preference?

is there such a thing as too much cleaning?
I don't think there is a right or wrong answer
I DO, however, feel that there is such a thing as too much cleaning.
Just my two cents worth.

FYI, I'm one of the "occasional" cleaners. AMT get the action cleaned when it starts getting "gunky"
Hunting guns get cleaned before I sight them in for the season. Then, unless I hunt in the rain, they are not cleaned until the end of the season. (Exception being my muzzle loader which, of course, has to be cleaned after every time it's shot.)
Paul
 

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Cleaning

On my 10/22 and Mark II for normal cleaning after a day at the range I just pull a patch through the barrel and spray the action with bore cleaner to get the crud out.

On my bolt action rifles, which I shoot better ammo in. I don't do anything unless they look like they need it or have dropped in accuracy.
 

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Boresnake usually does it

Degunked a couple of actions last summer by a solvent bath followed by blowing out the incrudation with compressed air.

I don't think there's a set answer to this question, depends on the shooter.more than the state of the gun;) .
 
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