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What is the coldest weather you have personally experienced?

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What is the coldest weather you have ever personally experienced?
 

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Ok, my coldest was -46 F in January 2000 while working in Novosibirsk, Russia (Western Siberia). Even the Siberians were staying inside.

Siberians have a saying, "there is no bad weather, only bad clothing."

Stay warm this winter! :D
 

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Seen 30 something below here in Iowa with windchill index who knows where, enough to try the brass on a monkey. When stationed in Wisconsin in my youth some of the guys had trouble with frost bite in their lungs from running out in the weather.
 

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-28 for a few days - batteries pulled inside, furnace couldn't keep up, pretty close to frost bite on fingers and face. The cold spell lasted for two weeks and once got above 0. Makes you just appreciate what a few a the folks who regularly have to endure the conditions have to go though.
 

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1 very long winter at Osan AB Korea. Fronts would come rolling down through China from Siberia.

It was minus 40 for a few days, small trees shattered from being frozen through and through. It was an eye opener for a southern kid.

When it got below 0, I couldn't tell a difference it was just bad cold. Wind would pick up the ice crystals and blast them into any exposed skin, brutal.

I came home to Texas in early May and it was already getting in the high 80's. I thought I was gonna die from the heat, it's funny now but wasn't then.
 

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When I lived in Fairbanks Alaska it got very, very cold brrrrrrrrr...I could always tell if it got to 30 below or colder 'cause the seat in my truck felt like a park bench :eek: Now I live in Florida and get chilled when it gets down to 50...LOL
 

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In Wyoming, winter of 89/90. Had temps of -48 for a week straight and on the third day my choke froze open on my truck. That was a fun one to get started. Then once I got it going when I went to work my heater could not keep up so I had the ice scrapper in the cab to clear the inside windshield.... guess I should of callled in. :rolleyes:
 

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We did an artic op, it was -47 the one morning. We stayed in our caves. Screw that crap.

Now that I'm retired, as a squivilian -24 in Alexandria MN was bad enough and I only had to run from the hotel to the car. ;)
 

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-60 twenty miles south of Fairbanks Alaska. -50 was not uncommon. It's odd though, -20 up there is not bad at all. The coldest I ever was, was in Biloxi, MS and the temp was +34. When I lived in Alaska there would be days of -35 to -40 where I would be out all day hunting. If you dress right, in dry cold like up there, you can stay pretty comfortable.
 

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I knew one old timer that would get a pan of bubbling liquid propane out of the tank to start a fire. I would say propane changes state somewhere around minus forty.

Minus twenty five and windy is the most dangerous, nasty, destructive winter thing I have dealt with by far though.
 

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In Wyoming, winter of 89/90. Had temps of -48 for a week straight and on the third day my choke froze open on my truck. That was a fun one to get started. Then once I got it going when I went to work my heater could not keep up so I had the ice scrapper in the cab to clear the inside windshield.... guess I should of callled in. :rolleyes:
My company had its offices in a building in downtown Casper at that time. If I recall correctly, the high for the WEEK was about -20, getting down to well below -40 at night.

One day, I showed up and the heat was dead in my part of the building. So the guy who owned the building, and I, and some other folks started tracking down where the hot water heating system was frozen. We tracked it down to a corner office where a guy had piled up a huge bunch of cardboard boxes full of stuff right in the corner, blocking any air flow to that very vulnerable area.

So we moved all of these hundreds of boxes out of the way and got a diesel-fuel "salamander" and proceeded to aim it right at that corner.

We were all pretty happy with ourselves, and liking the heat from that thing, but all of a sudden, we all got the exact same idea, and everyone, in unison, said "is the water turned off to this leg of the system?" Of course, right at that moment, it blew! Water shot out of the three inch pipe at an amazing rate, flooding that room and driving us out, running for the valve which was, of course, several floors down, in a cellar type area with the boiler and all of that equipment.

When it was over, there was about an inch of ice all over the floor of that part of the building, and all the way down the stairwell, and leading out to the street. You needed crampons to climb our stairs for about a week after that. :)

Once things heated up in the building, it melted and eventually dried OK. But it was entertaining.

That's about as cold as I've seen it in central Wyoming, personally.

The worst I ever had to work in was in lovely Walden Colorado (not far from the WY border). This was sometime in the late '70s or early '80s. The high for that week was -22, and there was a steady wind of about 20 MPH. Not gusty, but just a steady, stiff breeze.

And we had to work outside, wiring some automatic well test systems. It turns out that a person's fingers can't do fine work, like stripping wires and screwing them into small terminal strips, when they're frozen :rolleyes: These systems were controlled via 75 pair 'phone cables and every single conductor in each cable had to be terminated to screw terminals.

Me and another guy took turns in about five minute "shifts". One would be in the truck with his hands held up to the heater outlet while the other one did more wiring until he couldn't move his fingers again.

You couldn't do it with gloves on, so you just had to go back and forth between the truck and the work over and over. It was not very efficient, but it needed to get done right then, I guess.

And let me tell you about what passed for a "hotel" in Walden then, too. Let's just say that you needed the furnace in your room to be on, but you didn't dare go to sleep with it on for fear of explosion or being gassed to death. It was lovely :cool:

Walden is a nice place, though. Really, it is...
 

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You are quite right that propane acts, shall we say, quite liquid, at temperatures around -50. In 1971 I was living in northern Alberta. I woke up early one morning because the house was getting really cold. When I checked our propane furnace, it was on, but the flames were very very low, just a bare blue glimmer. I checked the thermometer and it read -51F. I knew the problem, so I quickly went out and built a small fire under the propane tank. This restored pressure and the house started to warm. Of course in those days, workplaces and schools never closed due to a little thing like temperature, so bundling up off I went to work, The truck was plugged in so reluctantly it did start, but as I started off down the road to town, I was just about jolted out of my seat due to the fact that the tires were frozen flat where they had rested on the ground all night. Then about 1 or 2 miles down the lane, the truck started to boil. Boil? In -50?? I opened the hood to find that the fan belt had frozen so hard that it had shattered, just like glass, when the truck started, and only a few shinney pieces remained attached to the fabric belting. Luckily I had a pair of my wifes old nylon leotards in the cab so that I could make a temporary belt to get to town. While i was getting the new belt, I noticed that my tires were badly chipped, due to the rubber chipping off in the cold as they flexed. Windchill is the worst, but from -45 down even if its calm, which at those temperatures it usually is, it can get dangerous.
 

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We had a 1968 International Travelall that had nylon bias ply tires. When it was cold out, the tires got "flat spots" on them and for the first mile or so, it'd just about rattle the teeth out of your head :)

I never had the rubber chip off of 'em, though! :eek: That's cold!
 

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Lived in Alaska for 8 years, and lived in Great Falls Mont for a bit as well as Minot, ND. As well hunted in Alberta, Saskatchawan, Manitoba during some of the coldest deer seasons a man could stand! Now retired and living in Tropical weather where we never see below 90, go figure!:eek:
 

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Traveling in Russia , I heard a story about the early days after the fall of the Soviet empire
how they removed the war heads
raised the missles out of thier holes and removed the motors and allowed the fuel to drain into the hole and torched it then left them sitting there to rust..

so we took a detour and the weather changed

i dunno what it was but it was -50 something a few hours before this and the wind had risen to a steady 45 kph gusting to 60 occasionly so maybe -75 or -80 F ???

but this was a s close as we went for a few reasons

one of them 150 miles or so to accomodation



no special filters or tricks used on lense

its the lense frosting over,,
 
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