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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I'm sure this has been addressed here before, but I want to hear from what you all think.

I have a M69 Target that is in good shooting shape, but has almost none of the blue left on the barrel. There is quite a bit of freckling, and a couple of spots where rust started but was removed, leaving the metal almost bare. There are also a few small scratches and dings, but no deep pits (yet). The reciever is in much better shape, with good bluing, no rust, freckling or pits. I keep everything well oiled to prevent further deterioration, but fear it will continue to rust away unless action is taken, especailly if I use it in the field.

The front sight was replaced with a reproduction from Numrich's, and the stock was refinished before I got the rifle. The trigger guard and magazine plate have been painted black, so its seen better days, and is by no mean original.

I paid $150 for the rifle, and would like to have this one as a shooter/field gun, saving my nicer 69A Target for the range. I have been quoted $130 for rebluing, from an outfit that comes highly recomended (Ahlman's). I realize that for around $300 I could find one in much better condition, but this is the one I have, and shoot, and I want to preserve her for the future.

My philosophy regarding firearms is they are tools to use (I don't have any safe queens), but I fear taking this one out due to its rather fragile state, and feel that it is better to restore and preserve this gun than to leave it in its present state to deteroirate further.

Cost factors aside, what would you do?

Thanks!
J.
 

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Under those conditions, I say refinish and enjoy it. With two sons starting college and another not far behind, I can't really afford any safe queens. For that I'm sorta thankful since we enjoy shooting the firearms we do have.

So...I say "Go for it!" :t

azimuth
 

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Another good option is if you want it for a shooter, is to use something like Duracoat or GunKote. This is a finish that you can easily do yourself. I was given a model 69A that was in pretty poor shape externally, but had a decent bore. I Duracoated in the matte finish and have found it to be a very good finish. It's a very easy finish to apply. First I stripped the gun completely, using tape to hold the small parts on a piece of cardboard. Then, I cleaned the existing finish with acetone, and finally sprayed the Duracoat. It covers well and seems very durable. The manufacturer recommends abrasive blasting the parts before spraying to give some "tooth" for the coating to adhere to the metal. I don't have access to a blast cabinet, so I didn't do that step, just cleaned thoroughly with the solvent.
 

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I suggest trying a low cost method first.Cleaning the metal with Gum Turpentine soaked 4 ought steel wool pads,followed by an application of Brownells Oxpho Blue as needed to get the finish up to par with the redone stock.If the result suits you for the rifle's intended purpose you are $100 ahead,if it dosen't,you wasted a few hours and thirty dollars or so.The one that has to be pleased is you,hopefully you will be.
 

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In addition to four treatments of oxphoblue I would buy a quart tin of linseed oil with quick drying additives and apply four coats of linseed oil to the wood. After the bluing is done I would buy a can of Brownells metal epoxy and give the metal parts a coat to eliminate future rusting. The whole shebang might cost you $50 and that includes shipping and I thing $50 is a high-side estimate. My philosophy of (almost) no safe queens is very similar to yours with a scant handful of exceptions that have serious collector value. If you need details about any of the above we can help. H.G.
 

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If you are like me and you want things done right the first time, without any experimentation or effort. I wouldn't think twice about spending $130.00
Then your gun will exceed your expectation, instead of working hard to meet your expectation.
As an old guy once told me. "Want to find the easiest way to do something? Ask the lazy-est guy you know."
LB
 

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I personally wouldn't worry about the rifle if it's going to be used more. The rifle has already been tampered with extensively so it has no collector value and if you send it in to be refinished it might turn out so good that you won't want to take it hunting anymore.

I say use and enjoy the old war horse.
 

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I'D so something to it. It is a gun meant to be used, and i would keep in that tradition before it gets ruined and of no use. Now doing it yourself or having someone else depends on alot of things that only you know, like time you have to do it, money in your pocket, you handiness skill level, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, guys here's what I did:

One of our members PM'd me, recomending I use Birchwood-Casey Perma Blue. Following his instructions, I dismounted the stock and used CLP and 0000 steel wool to clean the barrel. There was one spot of rust near the fore end tip that I rubbed out with a very fine Scotch Brite. To my surprise, it cleaned up very well smoothing out the small pits that were present. Also used the Scotch Brite on two scratches near the front sight. These scratches were through the original blue and into the steel. These also were smoothed out.

Next, I de-greased the barrel with mineral spirits. Using large cotton patches, I applied a coat of Perma Blue to the barrel only, not to the reciever. The blue came out very thin, and showed some of the freckling underneath, but looked OK. I cleaned again with mineral oil and applied another coat. This time the freckling underneath was covered much better.

I could have done another coat and probably had a nice deep even blue, but I decided to stop. The blue is a very close match to factory (the area covered by the sight ramp was my reference). I oiled everything with CLP and it is curring as I write this.

Reults: The barrel is now protected, and looks very appropriate to the gun. I hope that the finish holds up, but application was so easy that I won't mind if I have to do it again.

Costs for all materials: About $12 for mineral spirits, blue, gloves and cotton patches.

Time: Less then an hour, including prep, clean up and this post.

If I have to do this again, I think I'll use the Scotch Brite over the entire barrel for a more uniform finish.

Worked great, very easy, and I'm satisfied with the results which is all that matters. Thanks Tom!!!
 

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I picked up this 75T a couple years back for 175$. Bluing was almost gone, so came the perma blue job (not the greatest) and the stock was pretty beat up. The gun was already drilled and tapped by the previous owner(s) so i wasnt too concerned about its value other than the 175$. I think it turned out halfway decent and on a good day its a 3/4" at 50 with the Redfields. I'd say do what you want, but enjoy the gun. Mitch
 
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