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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there information on the temperature of freshly ejected brass for various cal? Know a fellow at Ruger.org got one between his glasses and eye. It burned his cornea but he expects to fully recover the Dr. said. Hat and eye protection. 1911M
 

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Other than darn hot, no idea.

A hat is a good idea. My father-in-laws 1911 (just post ww1 manufacturing) tosses the last round's brass right onto the top of the shooters head.

Paul.
 

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Gosh. Dunno. I know I don't grab up a spent case as soon as it hits the bench. They cool off pretty quick. It would be pretty hard to measure.

But they're hot. A case from my Buckmark (.22) once flew back and caught my right ear. Caught the edge just right. Nicked me and burnt me at the same time.

Was talking to someone at the range last weekend and our neighbor's .45 case hit my front tooth. Burnt my lip a little bit.

Obviously it's hot enough to burn someone's cornea... You can always use glasses with side shields, or goggles... and maybe a hat. Sometimes I wear a hat, sometimes I don't. I wore the headgear-type ear protection for awhile after I burnt my ear. :rolleyes:

-S
 

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I used to be really big into RC (radio control) especially nitro aka gas trucks. I used to have a handy device. It was an infared temp monitor, I used to use it to check my cooling head on my engine. If it was too lean and running hot, I would richen the carb a little. too cool, and bogging down, I would lean it a little.

Anyways, i sold it along w/ the RC truck(s) and should have kept that thing. Would have been handy to measure the temp of the casing(s).
 

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hot enough to blister skin.

and one of the ranges i went to had that green plastic stuff that looks kind of like fake grass lining the sides of each shooting bay. it was covered with burn marks from the spent casings that were hitting it. keep in mind that the shell would only be in contact with the plastic for a fraction of a second...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I expect they only get hotter as the camber heats up from rapid firing so It would seem wise to wear appropriate eye protection and if they are so hot you might drop the gun, long sleeves. I've had a few ,actually a lot more than a few with the P-22, bounce off me but not stick anywhere. I remember picking up a couple after emptying a clip and they were still too hot to comfortably hold. 1911M
 

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In 1977 my wife's cousin decided he wanted to go shooting with us. Dennis is about 6'6" and maybe 325 lbs. He bought one of those tiny little Browning semi autos that eject out the bottom. One day he had his usual long sleeved shirt on and the thing ejected a shell inside the cuff of his shirt and when it started burning him he started dancing! The cuff that let the shell in would NOT let it out. Picture this big guy jumpimg up and down, waving this little rifle around and cussing and going on!! :eek: :D Of course none of the rest of us knew why he was suddenly going nuts but we were laughing so hard that it really didn't matter :D :D
 

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I can't imagine there being enough brass in a .22 shell do transfer sufficient energy for anything more than a 1st degree burn.

The real danger at ranges is shooting with someone who has an HK G3 or clone. They use a delay impinged roller lock for .380 NATO and my buddies will kick brass 30 feet or more. One day, we were shooting at his backyard range and not one, but TWO, empty casings embedded themselves, neck end first, in the bark of Aspen trees to the right of the shooting position.

:D
 

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GonzoP22-1 said:
I can't imagine there being enough brass in a .22 shell do transfer sufficient energy for anything more than a 1st degree burn.

:D
Gonzo, first degree burn causes skin to turn red. Second degree causes blistering. Third degree chars tissue.

I've gotten a fair number of second degree burns from just fired .22 cases, usually long rifles. Most from any single firearm was from a Walther P22 being wrung out on a Texas summer day. My sweat kept the shells stuck to my skin and I had cartridge case shaped blisters over my shooting hand and arm and several on my upper chest.
 
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