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Stock blanks

442 Views 7 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  MEnglish
I have just found some freshly fallen trees that I can cut some stock blanks from. Black Walnut and Osage Orange. Problem is I have no idea how to cut them. I can imagine that it is somewhat like cutting steaks and you need to pay attention to the grain. Could anybody give me some pointers? What size tree is needed and how do you choose your cuts?
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Osage orange is next to worthless for stocks- yes, some stocks have been made from it, and there are some who will say its good, but what it will cost to cut-dry-plane-store-rotate them its a waste.
Walnut trees really need to 3 feet across to make it worth your time, unless you already have a mill, planes, huge bandsaws etc. So some research at your local library or google up how to cut tree's. Its all the same more or less unless you are after quarter sewn blanks- you get four per log- however long the log is.
Lots of info on the interwebbie for tricks tips on cutting lumber, it all applies the same, whether cherry, walnut, pine, oak. Also quite a bit of google for after the milling is done. good luck, it can be worth the effort!

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carve orange?

osage orange also known as hedge is probably the hardest wood available to any body that grows here in the states. I work in the foresty industy as a line clearance tree trimmer and run into hedge on occasion. this stuff is tougher than a burnt boot it has wrecked countless chainsaw chains, ruined bars, shattered sprockets and compleatly locked up one saw that i have seen. even if it doesn't destroy something the chain is always dull and needs sharpend. i think if you are going to carve this stuff you are going to need explosives or laser technoligy. if it is staight you can sell it to bowyers if you can find some other than that it makes very hot burning fire wood. :Blasting_
 

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running boar is right

about the Osage Orange or Bodock or Hedge Apple or what ever you want to call it. It is a prime material for self bows and has been since only the Indians know when. Do a little research on cutting, splitting and curing the staves and it definitely has value.

Good luck

sawdust
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the info guys. I was afraid that the trees were to small. It sounds like they may be too small for solid wood blanks but I might give it a try. The drying process may also be quite the chour. Now self bows are a definate possibility. I have a friend who makes them. He has always talked about the prized Osage and I thought it might also make good gunstocks. Problem is these trees are more like bushes than single trunk trees. There is not much for straight wood. The biggest logs are probably not much more than 12" thick. I also have a laminate project that I have been wanting to do. It sounds like the Osage will kill the planer though.

Tuck, I am about 1 hour north of Detroit.

Thanks again.
 

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I recently had two large-ish pecan logs milled into lumber. Each was about 16-20" diameter, one was 12 feet long the other about 16'. Rented a trailer to get the logs to the mill ($30), hired a couple folks to help move the logs ($40), had the mill saw them into 5/4 boards ($200). Then stacked and split them in an unfinished attic space for drying. The mill guy said it'll take 3-6 mo. to dry. Then I've got to get a planer ($400) and a table saw ($1800).

Pecan wood runs about $4/bf online, and I'll probably end up with a couple hundred board feet. Was it worth it? Who knows? It was a lot of work, and there's a lot more work to do before they're usable, but it was a fun experiment. And whatever I build will have a story behind it: priceless.

All of which is a long way of saying you're in for a lot of work if you want to try it. Which is not to say you shouldn't; walnut and osage orange are pretty expensive, and even if all you ended up with is smaller pieces it still might be worth it for the experience. Check out what exotic hardwood pen blanks are going for; sell a bunch of small pieces to a pen-turner and you might make a little money.

Good Luck!

c.
 
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