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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I purchased a stainless 1022 about a year ago. I have no experience gunsmithing or machining but would like to build the most accurate 1022 I can. I already did a trigger job and would like to get a good barrel / stock, but don't like the butler creek combo's you see in all the catalogs. I want to get a composite stock and heavy barrel, but do I need to free float / bed the barrel? Is it necessary for such a light round? If I do need to do this I would appreciate any advice on where to start.

also...don't want whatever barrel I get to make it picky with ammo
 

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Bedding, barrel Floating

Dieseler said:
Check out the tips and tricks section. Then try a search for whatever you are still curious about, you'll come up with a ton of information.
First, Welcome to RFC, nice to meet you.

+1 for Dieseler post, Here's the best info on bedding that I've found: http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=95016.

You'll get differing opinions (even from the guys who have built many 1022's), about bedding and freefloating the barrel, but my .02 worth, based on much research and advice from those who are usually reliable, is that the bull barrel config works best floated at the muzzle end, but bedded for about the first couple of inches ahead of the receiver. That's how my first 1022 is done and I'm quite happy with the results so far (several < .25" groups at 50 yards, many groups in the teens at 25).

A couple of mistakes to avoid (remember, I'm new at this too :D : ) -
Do the bedding before finishing the stock, (first mistake I made)
Bed only one area of the receiver/barrel at a time, thus avoiding my second mistake of totally fuzing the stock and the action! I think the above sticky covers this. Bedding sequence for my second 1022 is going like this:
1. Bed the rear of the receiver/stock
2. Bed the receiver/action mounting lug to stock
3. Bed the first 2 inches of barrel.

Good Luck and keep us posted on the new build! :)
 

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GM and VQ barrels have been the most accurate for me. My best shooter is a GM 20" SS. The GM and the receiver are fully bedded in a McMillan thumbhole from VQ. MY next most accurate ones are "bedded" with a pressure pad near the end of the forearm. I've not been impressed with free-floating accuracy in my rifles. I only have one free-floated, and that is a VQ 16" CF. In my experience, free-floating calls for a really good job of receiver bedding so that it remains rigid. The tighter the receiver bedding, the more accurate the CF has gotten.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
clarification

Thanks for the responses, guys. This may be a very basic question but that's the level I'm at with doing any mods. When you buy a new stock and barrel, do the stocks usually have channels already dug in them that you just have to fill with the glass and get it to countour to your barrel or do you typically have to do that yourself?
Thanks again for your replies thus far.
Snash
 

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I will add my welcome. All questions are good. Fear not.

Most stocks are delivered to some spec, ready to fit either standard or 'bull barrel' depending on what you selected. To 'bed' it you add filler material at key locations within the stock to improve the tightness/tolerance of the fit between the stock and the barrel and/or action. You usually have to carve a little of the stock material away in order to provide a good foundation for the filler, but it is not much. They don't come 'preshaped' in ANTICIPATION of adding bedding (as far as I know), if that is what you are asking.

Consider a phased approach. Buy the stock you want, buy the barrel, fit it up, try it, practice, and decide if it needs bedding.
 
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