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slide release question

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Hey, i just picked up my gun today,
This is my first semi-auto handgun, and i had 2 questions,
when i pull the slide back, it automatically locks back against the slide release lever, i thought on semi autos if you lock the slide back there were 2 ways to release it, 1 depress the release lever, or 2 pull the slide backward and the lock will fall and you can just let go of the slide, which doesn't happen with the p22, the slide lock is on a spring that keeps it pushed up, is that normal
also i noticed that if the hammer is down, and you begin to pull the trigger, the hammer will lock back in like a "half cock" mode, ive never heard anyone talk about this, what is this position for?
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Hey, i just picked up my gun today,
This is my first semi-auto handgun, and i had 2 questions,
when i pull the slide back, it automatically locks back against the slide release lever, i thought on semi autos if you lock the slide back there were 2 ways to release it, 1 depress the release lever, or 2 pull the slide backward and the lock will fall and you can just let go of the slide, which doesn't happen with the p22, the slide lock is on a spring that keeps it pushed up, is that normal
also i noticed that if the hammer is down, and you begin to pull the trigger, the hammer will lock back in like a "half cock" mode, ive never heard anyone talk about this, what is this position for?
If you have an empty magazine in the gun and pull the slide back it should lock and stay there until you hit the release lever. Or you can put in a loaded magazine and pulling the slide back and release or again hit the release lever. Only the release lever releases the slide with an empty magazine. The only thing I can think of with the hammer locking half way back is the trigger lock in on. I don't ever use it so I'm not certain about this. 1911M will surely know.
 

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Hey, i just picked up my gun today,
This is my first semi-auto handgun, and i had 2 questions,
when i pull the slide back, it automatically locks back against the slide release lever, i thought on semi autos if you lock the slide back there were 2 ways to release it, 1 depress the release lever, or 2 pull the slide backward and the lock will fall and you can just let go of the slide, which doesn't happen with the p22, the slide lock is on a spring that keeps it pushed up, is that normal
also i noticed that if the hammer is down, and you begin to pull the trigger, the hammer will lock back in like a "half cock" mode, I've never heard anyone talk about this, what is this position for?
Welllllllllllllllll :D Mississislippi Dave is correct. The way the P22 works is there is a small spring located under the slide catch mechanism which is just under the polymer housing. So be really careful when removing the frame from the housing. That spring is about the thickness of a human hair and will fly. Good luck on finding it. Some folks remove the housing inside of a large baggie to catch any fly-away parts. If you keep your thumb on the stop mechanism as you pull the frame out of the housing the spring will stay put until you gently release it.

But, back on topic......that little spring keeps the slide stop disengaged by pressing the stop downward. It will not engage the slide until the magazine follower button is allowed to reach all they way to the top of the magazine and this only occurs when the magazine is empty, either inserting an empty mag to begin with or when the mag is empty from shooting.

So, when you fully insert an empty magazine the slide stop will catch and hold the slide open because the follower button is all the way to the top.

If you insert a magazine, even with just one round in it, the catch will not engage and you can pull the slide fully rearward and slingshot it to remove the last round. Or if the slide is locked back already, insert a new mag, 1 round or ten, press down on the release and the slide will fly forward stripping one round from the mag leaving the pistol in single action. Of course you can manually engage the stop ay time you wish by simply pulling the slide rearward and pushing up on the stop mechanism against the tiny springs pressure.

The important thing to remember is that the follower button on an empty mag overcomes the small springs tension and causes the slide stop to engage. Therefore, on that last shot, the stop mechanism will be pressed against the bottom left edge of you slide and will drag along there on the last shot only. That is why you should keep a check on the top edge of the stop mechanism to see that it doesn't develop a sharp edge due to peening. If it does it will cause unnecessary wear to the bottom of the slide. Serious??? not really but you've got plenty of time to look things over so keep it ship shape.

All semi automatics that I know of, and I don't know em all by a long shot, have a full cock notch and a safety catch notch. Many people make the mistake of carrying their semi with the hammer half-cocked. This is incorrect. A guy who just paid a gunsmith $250 to finely tune his trigger action, that is the sear/hammer cock notch interface would have a fit seeing his pistol carried this way. What this notch does is catch the hammer should the hammer for some reason not fully cock when firing and follow the slide forward. Without any other safety features it is possible in such a situation to have multiple fires or go full auto.

The reason you don't want to carry this way is first this is not a carry safety and you risk the possibility of damaging the sear, especially if you drop the pistol or bang the hammer into something. But won't the pistol fire? Not the P22, it has a manual lever safety that employs a cam when rotated to safe that locks the rear of the firing pin. Then is has a firing pin block inside the breech block that physically blocks the firing pin from moving unless the trigger is pulled and the front arm of the sear releases the block and finally the P22 firing pin is inertia driven.

That is it is too short to reach the rim of a cartridge, is constantly pressed toward the rear of the pistol by a spring and takes the firm whack of the hammer to drive it forward with enough energy to overcome the spring and hit the rim with sufficient force to dent the rim.

Ten-fifteen years ago or so Colt 1911 models and other 1911 style pistols had an inertia firing pin but no firing pin block. It is reported that dropping a loaded pistol on the muzzle could cause the sudden stop to drive the firing pin against the primer with sufficient force to fire the round. I've never seen this happen, have seen videos of pistols purposely dropped on the muzzle using a vertical rod to guide the pistol on it's descent.

Of course, one of the problems here is that all pistols are not in the same safe shooting condition. Take one with a weakened firing pin return spring and the firing pin would be free to hit the cartridge with much more force than with a properly tensioned spring. Of recent, a firing pin block has been added much to the consternation of many 1911 fans. One of mine has one and I've tested trigger pull with and without and I can't see a bit of difference.

So, the first notch is a fail safe catch should the hammer follow the slide forward, not waiting for you to pull the trigger on a semi and is not for safely storing or carrying the pistol. And it is perfectly normal if you pull the trigger a bit to rotate the hammer rearward just enough for the sear to drop into this notch. My 2 cents. :bthumb: M1911
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks for the detailed post, i plan to go out this saturday and break it in, is all that 'shoot once, clean, repeat'
stuff just hype, it would seem that if you needed to do anything like that, it would be recommended by the manufacturer.
 

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nah, i would say the shoot once, clean, repeat is a bunch of rubbish. i only clean mine when it starts looking bretty dirty and i have ever had it go wrong with ammo that is powerfull enough to rack the slide. mine proably hasnt been cleaned for a couple hundred rounds and ill probably put atleast another hundred through it before cleaning.
just as a random note; for observed trials we say 'keep on trialin' what your you say for shooting your p22?

:Blasting_
 

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When mine was new, it liked to be cleaned more often. Now it's broken in and takes a lot of abuse. I usually run a boresnake through the barrel a couple of times immediately after finishing shooting while it's warm, and just wipe out the chamber and magazine lips with a patch to clean off the blowback. The manual does say to use hi-velocity ammo, and mine used to be picky and only like CCI Mini-mags when it was new. Now it takes just about any high-velocity ammo with no problem.

M1911 taught me everything I've needed to know so far about my P-22! He's better than Smith and Wesson!

I have other guns now, and this one is still my favorite for just hanging out at the range doing cathartic shooting.
 
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