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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Browning .22 semi-auto take down rifle that has been in the family for years. It was my dad's and I'm 47 so it's been around for a while. The serial number on this rifle is "123456". Literally. The digits 1 through 6 are neatly stamped in the location where the serial number should be. I would have thought the rifle could be old enough that it might not have had a serial number. That number doesn't even match the format described in the links from the serial number "Sticky" thread in this forum.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether or not this is actually the serial number? Are there any other clues I can use to date this rifle?

Thanks,
Bob
 

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22's were not required to have serial numbers until 1968 when the Gun Act was passed but some companies serialed them for years before that. Also for insurance and even for import reasons people added their own "serial numbers" to guns. It is just a wild guess but based on your own doubts I would think that is what is going on. Why not call or email Browning and see what they have to say.

I've got and old Crossman 112 that has been customized and is a great Co2 gun and a email to Crossman I found out it was from 1952 (just like me)! So that is what I would do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, it not a T. Definitely 123456. However, after studying the manual available on the Browning web site, I see that this number it not in the correct place for a serial number. It is on the left side of the receiver (just above the trigger and not on the flat of the receiver). In addition it is upside down and the digits don't quite line up (looks hand stamped).
 

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Hi Bob,
If you separate the rifle is there a serial number on the front of the receiver? This was a common area. Another possibility if it is a older wheelsight rifle- take the butt plate off and on the bottom of the wooden butt might be the actual serial number in yellow chalk, F.N. would do this to keep the wood matched to the receiver.
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bingo!. Front of the reciever has T49607. There is a chalk number written under the buttplate but it appears to only be 3 digits and might be 152. The plate surrounding the hole (in the butt) where the magzine assembly is inserted has the number T49614. Would this normally match the receiver?

One of the web pages listed in the "sticky" thread for dating Brownings says T49607 would be a 1959 gun. Any characteristics that would support or contradict this date? I suppose this could be correct as I was born in 1958 and this rifle was around the house from my earliest memories.

Can you tell me what you mean by "wheelsight". This rifle has a flip-up rear sight (adjustable for elevation) mounted in a dovetail on the barrel. There are no scope mount screw holes (as shown in the manual downloaded from the Browing web site) but the receiver is groved for a Weaver Tip-off mount and the rifle has a Weaver C4 scope.

Just behind the rear sight, there is a slot cut in the barrel. Can you tell me what this is for?

Thanks,
Bob


 

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The "wheelsight" is a long sight, with the elevation adjustment enlarged beneath the rear area of the sight. It looks like a wheel, or a coin, laying on it's side. It's spun, to adjust the sight.
The groove to the rear of the rear sight dovetail looks like the seat for the wheelsight, so it looks like someone either replaced the wheelsight with the folder, or the wheelsight was missing and a folder was all they had.
The non-matching numbers all over the gun usually indicate a non-original, assembled with parts from different guns.
 
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