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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tore down my RRR to clean it after its first 400 or so rounds. The gun cycled beautifully with a variety of ammunition but it looks like the bolt is striking the trigger group casting. Have you seen this before? Any ideas?

 

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It's normal

Set your bolt on the trigger housing. Now move it back and forth. The back beveled edge on the bolt can go back and drop off that ledge on the trigger housing. (Upon firing.) The bolt also ride on top of the magazine also. On my most used housing it is a light touch on the back right with a little more on the left back (the ledges) and on the left front to the outside .100 inch approx.

I belive it is from the + - specks of the hole locations and tolerance stacking. I would not worry about it. Mike

PS The finish is the only wear I have ( would be hard to measure) and has a polished look. I think I'll use FP-10 on the top of the trigger housing. :t
 

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I have one older action that looks just like that. It also has very loose pins. I think the bolt hitting the trigger group has hammered the cross pin holes out of spec. I recently saw a mod where the pins were replaced with machine screws. I thought that might hold trigger group in its proper place preventing further damage. Now that I see this on a new rifle I would like to know if comparison of parts would show what is out of tolerance to allow contact. Please continue post with your resolution to this issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Randall_1611 said:
Set your bolt on the trigger housing. Now move it back and forth. The back beveled edge on the bolt can go back and drop off that ledge on the trigger housing. (Upon firing.) The bolt also ride on top of the magazine also. On my most used housing it is a light touch on the back right with a little more on the left back (the ledges) and on the left front to the outside .100 inch approx.

I belive it is from the + - specks of the hole locations and tolerance stacking. I would not worry about it. Mike

PS The finish is the only wear I have ( would be hard to measure) and has a polished look. I think I'll use FP-10 on the top of the trigger housing. :t
The divot made by the bolt on my trigger housing is much deeper than just through the paint, maybe 30 thousandths deep. My cross pins are snug, not sloppy. Seem like the mounting holes on the receiver or trigger group are positioning the trigger housing too close to the bolt. If this is the case, the Kid cross pins may not be a solution.

I wonder if removing a bit of aluminum from the trigger housing where the divots are to create a lttle clearance would solve the problem? or would that make the bolt strike the housing a little closer to the chamber?
 

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Look at the bolt when it is in the rearward position in the reciever. There is very little to nothing in the reciever that is holding the bolt up. This is where the trigger housing and magazine come into play. Some of my 10/22's have those marks, some don't. On one that looked like it was getting hammered, I just superglued a small piece of thin rubber on each side behind the hump. As the bolt moves back and drops down it runs on the rubber and holds it up so when the bolt starts to close it doesn't hit those humps. They have lasted so far, but Teflon or something like it would probably be better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
gunter said:
Look at the bolt when it is in the rearward position in the reciever. There is very little to nothing in the reciever that is holding the bolt up. This is where the trigger housing and magazine come into play. Some of my 10/22's have those marks, some don't. On one that looked like it was getting hammered, I just superglued a small piece of thin rubber on each side behind the hump. As the bolt moves back and drops down it runs on the rubber and holds it up so when the bolt starts to close it doesn't hit those humps. They have lasted so far, but Teflon or something like it would probably be better.
Hmmm... maybe more set screws! I could notch the damaged area, drill, tap and insert #6-32 nylon grub screws into the hump area to buffer the top of the housing from the bolt. I'll have to look at it again to decide whether just removing some of the "hump" would take care of the problem or would it just give more room for the bolt to drop even lower? Anyone ever tried this?
 

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J Beede said:
The Kid pins are nice, but I'm not sure I want to countersink the outside of my receiver.
I originally shared your concern. When you get the kit, Tony supplies a "chamfering" bit, with instructions to use it a very low speed. I did him one better, becuase I shared your concern: I actually used the bit BY HAND to create the very small chamfering necessary to allow the locking screws to function. I found that by twirling the bit between my fiongers, I was able to create the chamfers in a controlled fashion. Only took about ten minutes to do all 4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
RX7-2nr said:
mine has the same exact thing. my pins are kinda loose too- maybe ill get to KID ones.
According to an expert, the problem is more likely the bolt dropping too low when it cycles back rather than loose pins allowing the trigger group to rise too high. I must say that the 10/22 has a pretty lame system for controlling the bolt as it cycles backward and forward--single guide rail attached at just one end. The Rem597 has a much nicer setup with dual guide rails firmly attached at both ends to better control the bolt as it travels. Of course the Remington design is essentially non-functional as a semi-automatic rifle, but its bolt never hits its trigger housing.

:bonk:
 

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I have loose pins too. I have about 600+ rounds through mine now and intend to shoot the heck out of her. I have a little wear on mine, but its functioning great. Anyone know who makes the trigger group? I can't make out the name. Is it worth keeping or would an upgrade be in order. It does shoot great but the trigger could be a tad smoother.

 

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OldSwede said:
I originally shared your concern. When you get the kit, Tony supplies a "chamfering" bit, with instructions to use it a very low speed. I did him one better, becuase I shared your concern: I actually used the bit BY HAND to create the very small chamfering necessary to allow the locking screws to function. I found that by twirling the bit between my fiongers, I was able to create the chamfers in a controlled fashion. Only took about ten minutes to do all 4.
I did mine the same way and no problems. 10 or 15 minutes by hand and I had a perfect fit.
 

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J Beede said:
I tore down my RRR to clean it after its first 400 or so rounds. The gun cycled beautifully with a variety of ammunition but it looks like the bolt is striking the trigger group casting. Have you seen this before? Any ideas?

My trigger groups look just like that.....just think of it as part of the "breaking in" process........
 

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I'm still clueless as to the maker of this trigger group. I guess it's a keeper. I don't mind the pull although it could break a little smoother. Think I should keep the housing and upgrade some internals? Anyone know a resource to ID this trigger housing?
 
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