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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering about the black finish on a S&W 422.

Is it just paint?

Can it be easily stripped?

Anyone know what it looks like underneath?

Can you just paint it again?

We have two of these and they are a blast. One is a shelf queen that gets no use whatsoever and the other is a rather abused little plinker. The abused one is getting kinda silvery around the edges and I was thinking of refinishing it if it can be done, but figured I'd strip it first, but then I thoght maybe I better ask here before I do anything.
 

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It's just a coating on a (as you mentioned) silver finished alloy. Brownell's makes a selection of spray on coatings that could be used to refinish it.
I like mine too. For a "economy" series gun, it is wll put togeather . Finish toughness seems to be it's biggest drawback.
 

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S&W Revolver

Hell Mark:
The coating on your revolver is "A SPRAYED ON PAINT"... This Can be removed and I have heard of some doing this. I also have seen some done and they look attractive when buffed on with a rubbing compound. They look like polished aluminum when one is done with the buffing. Best regards, Hammerdown
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you guys for the advice.

I figured it was just paint. One thing I was wondering was the type of alloy used. It is an intersesting structure with the back half of the frame riding on a rail and the barrel being in a position that is usually where a recoil guide would be.

I was kind of curious if all the exposed metal was the same type of alloy so if I stripped it would it look uniform? I know there is some aluminum and maybe some steel? And then would it need to be treated or repainted or could it be left bare?
 

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The frame is an alloy (a pretty dang good one too!), and the actual "slide" is steel. I'm about 90% sure that the finish on the 422 (the "blue" version) is actually a form of anodizing, albeit a rather dubious one. :rolleyes:
I bought one of these when they were just hitting the shelves new in '88 (6" Target Model), and another 4.5" Target Model as NIB in '98, (both 1988 production models, go figure! :) ) and have used every solvent you can imagine on this finish. The only thing that will actually wear the finish away is friction. My 6 inch model only has a bit of holster wear near the muzzle, and the 4.5" has NO wear anywhere, so I've been the "exception to the rule" as it were. I firmly believe it's anodizing, just very thin anodizing. Other than this weakness these guns have been fantastic for me. :t

FWIW! ;) - Dakotan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Anodizing, huh?

So maybe it is not just paint?

I was wondering because of the disimilar materials, one steel and one alloy. I figured the steel could have been blued but mine looks like paint. I figured the aluminum alloy could have been anodized but mine looks like paint.

I suppose if all the finish came off I could blue one and anodize the other...or leave them be, or paint them both.

Hammerdown, I take it you have actually seen one or two?

I was wondering as I have seen stripped Ruger 10/22 aluminum receivers and I think they look quite nice. I also have one of those "stainless" little short barreled S&W. I think it is a 2213 or 2206 or something. Now I am going to have to go get out of it's "hiding place."
 

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Stripping a model 422

Hello Mark:
I am sorry I MIS-READ the Model Number. I assumed you had a revolver but they used the same process for both. I have seen a revolver stripped of the famous "FLAKING" S&W Paint job.The alloy that was used in there revolver's was Aluminum and a small amount of Scandium which is a very hard metal added to give the weapon strength from firing pressures and recoil. It also serves to make the weapon durable over a long period of time. I am not certain if they used anything other than Aluminum in the .22 Pistol's but a quick call to S&W service will answer that as well. If you have seen a polished aluminum wheel then the finish should be the same on your gun if done right. I would strip it with acetone first. Then sand it with 1000 grit sandpaper. Then 1500 griit and finish with 2000 or 2500 grit. This is made by 3-M and can be bought at any auto store or Wal-Mart in the automotive section. Then I would get some "FLITZ" and begin the slow polishing process with and old tee-Shirt until it looked like a mirror for finish. The reason to use sand paper is it will take out any imperfection's and prepare it for the final mirror finish at the same time as well. Good Luck, Hammerdown
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks!

Colby Bruce said:
I stripped the finish off my first two #422 pistols by inserting them into a Bianchi X2000 shoulder holster; took the finish right off the edges.
That sounds familiar, thanks! Hey, I hear you are kind of the resident expert on S&W around here...do you think I should call them first or just go ahead and strip them?
 
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