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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a basic 10/22 for my project and when I pull back the bolt it is rough and gritty feeling. I heard that some other people sometimes have this problem with a cheap new 10/22 and used a dremel to clean up the bolt and the inside of the reciever. What kind of bits did you use to polish up the bolt and the inside of the receiver? Can anyone give me all the details on what they used and what they did?


cooljj
 

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OK

If you havnt, put about 500-700 rounds through it, breaks the action in, wears any burs down ect. Thats what everyone here says. If you have already put a brick through it, then the bolt spring may not be in place corectly, take the bolt out and check that area. could be the long spring and shaft attached to the bolt handle needs cleaning and oil. Could be a few diferent things, Is it interfearing with function, or just not super smoothe? Send some more info...like has it been fired, is it interfearing with function, is it gritty the whole length of pull, ect.. and the guys here will be able to figure it out. Dont start grinding anything untill some of the real 10/22 Guru's chime in! They will be along shortly im sure
 

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Have you just put a scope on it? If so, check the length of the screws to make sure they aren't dragging on top of the bolt..

PS.. Welcome to RFC! :t

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've probably put only 100-200 rounds through it to see if it would smooth it up abit, but it got to be a pain in the butt because I kept getting failure to ejects. I was using some cheap federal walmart 550 bulk ammo though. I guess I could get some CCI stuff or something to see if it cycles better but it seemed like kind of a waste since it isn't as cheap. I would rather use a dremel and make'er really smooth. Anyways, there is no scope on it yet. It is bare bones 10/22. I got it home, opened the box, pulled out the gun, cycled the bolt, I whinced and chills went up my spine. It sounded and felt like sand was in there or something. So I took it apart, cleaned it up and oiled it. Still felt the same. Inside the receiver there is some rough spots and a little bit of machining that looks rough. I figured this is the cause.

CoolJJ
 

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I went through this before (long post but worth it)

I have come to the conclusion that practically any new 10/22 purchased today will be very rough and very nasty feeling. It is a cheap rifle. You cannot expect Ruger to machine a fine piece of steel very well to build a $160 carbine.

The first 10/22 I shot was a well broken in 10/22 from the early 1980's, so both quality and use had a tremendous effect on it's action. When you pulled on the charging handle, it was smooth as silk. Once I bought mine in 2002, I expected it to be somewhat rougher since it is new, but I was surprised to see that it was absolutely horrible. Some people told me that it's just mine. But every gunshow and gunstore I have been to in the past 6 months, I have taken the time to feel other new 10/22's and they are all pretty darn rough when new.

This caused all kinds of problems. Failure to feed, failure to eject, sometimes it wouldn't strip a round off the mag, other times it would send the bullet up over the bore and then the bolt would crush the round bending it....It wasn't pretty.

Even though I was frustrated, I carried on and went through what many people on this forum will suggest, that is - shoot at least 2 bricks of hi-velocity ammo through it.

This is the funnest, and easiest way to cure any problems. If this doesn't solve the issue, then shooting another 2 bricks won't solve a thing, and only spoil your experience shooting.

After 2 bricks I still had serious problems. I tried different magazines, checked the magazine seating. I checked everything before having to resort to modification.

Once I decided that the roughnesss of the action was the culprit for the feeding/ejecting problems, I got myself 2 stones, and a variety of sandpapers.

I started with the bolt. I stoned every major flat surface of the bolt on a diamond stone. This is not a fine stone, but not too abrasive either. I did this to remove any high spots that might be present. This stone is actually a slab of aluminum with the diamond grit/dust on it, and it is a perfect straight edge which helps clear high spots. If your stone is not true, then you can stone parts unevenly. There were high spots on every side of my bolt. I also saw how really uneven the bolt is. I stoned just enough to lower these areas a bit, not to make them 100% flush on a given side. That might require taking off too much material, and will take too much time in some instances. Could also ruin it.

The next area I worked on was the reciever. I wouldn't use any power tool on the reciever since it is made of aluminum and the material is rather soft. This is just my feeling. I don't know how Ruger makes these, but it seems to be some sort of casting. When I would feel the inside of my reciever, it would feel a little rough. Only after I did work to it, did I really realise how much better it can be. I used those automotive sandpapers on it. A little 600 grit for rough areas, and then 1000+ to smooth it out. I only worked on the areas where the bolt would actually contact. I sanded (very lightly and carefully) the top of the reciever, and the 2 side walls. The top seemed to smooth very quickly as the 2 bricks of ammo and the charging handle did most of the work already. The side walls were a different story. On mine they were very rough. You could literally see the topography if it! So it took a bit of work on them to smooth them out. I didn't make them 100%, just smooth to the touch. To make them perfect would require too much material to be lost.

I also worked on the ejection port and all the surfaces near that area that comes in contact with the charging handle/guide rod. Some high spots or burrs there may cause the bolt or guide rod to either hop up or down during cycling. When manually cycling it, I could feel some bumpyness, so it's hard to say if this would be magnified during recoil like a ramp type effect. Since there is a good bit of play in a 10/22's action, you don't want any really violent movement other then back and forth of the bolt. Up and down is bad.

I then went as far as to work on the spring rod. I noticed that, when I would pull the bolt back, I could hear a small zipper sound. This was the handle scraping across the rod as it was compressing the spring. The way Ruger machines these parts, leaves a sort of surface that is just like the surface of a fine file. This was the same on the face of my hammer. So, I took the rod and polished it completely smooth. I also polished the hammer face smooth. Took some stoning, then some polishing. I also did some very light filing to the edges of the charging handle. These edges were very sharp and would grind/snag into the top of the reciever. So I rounded them ever so slightly. The springs rod is an ify idea, since it's a real pain in the rear to get it off, and put it back on.

After all this, I cleaned everything up, lubed very lightly and assembled. My action is as smooth as you can get. I did all of this without any serious removal of metal. Just enough to make things "smooth enough" without making the action looser. It feels like it glides, I am very happy.

I took it to the range, and lo and behold, my constant (every magazine) jams and failures all dissapeared. I have not had a single stove pipe, failure to feel, or failure to eject since. Nothing. Just a totally smooth as silk action.

I later went on to alter my extractor (made it like a VQ), headspace, stone hammer to around 3lbs, and do the pen trick.

I hope this helps. Everyones rifle is different. Some might need more work then mine (I doubt that) and most others won't need as much. Perhaps this can point you towards looking at potential problem areas caused by roughness in your action.

IronChef
 

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You can pull the charging handle back all the way on the guide rod and tie it back with florist wire then sand it down with 600 grit wet dry sand paper,then radius the rear of the bolt(as per antlurz instructions),then smooth n polish the hammer face.Be sure to generously apply drylube when finished.After you do this your action should be quite smooth with out doing anything to the reciever.This is all I've ever needed to do to smooth 1 up,but have went on to polish or shim the reciever on most of mine just to do it.
 
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