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Gunsmithing 10/22's and 77/22"s since 1994 Phone 1-860-343-0552
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I returned a couple of cracked receiver to Ruger including my own... Crack starts looking like a scratch going from bottom of receiver up thru the center of the serial number... When it gets worse it will crack on the opposite site thru the lower ejection port... When it gets serious the crack thru the serial number will continue up into the second scope screw hole on top, at this point you can bend the receiver up and down opening and closing the crack...

The only thing I found in common with all cracked receivers was the use of .22 Aguila SuperMax ammo which also is known to crack Marlin 60 - 80 series when it came on the market in the late 90's...

I never seen a crack back near the bolt stop pin and I seen hundreds of receivers... I seen a lot of receivers all the way back from the 60's with the original steel bolt stop pins that were still perfect with a hundred thousand High Velocity and Hyper Velocity rounds thru them... So I do not see the poly bolt buffer as necessary but not a bad idea - using the Aguila SuperMax ammo is, ammo is not accurate anywho...
Anyone with a cracked receiver can send it to Ruger in NH and it will be replaced, last time I got one replaced it came to a total with S&H of $33, might be more now?... A cracked receiver is extremely rare and I would not really worry about it too much which is the good news...

So, the bad news is the stock will hide the crack if its just starting, even if you remove the barreled action from the stock - it will look like a minor scratch (easy hidden with paint)... If there is a scratch going upward, flex the receiver and see if opens and closes, ask if .22 Aguila SuperMax ammo has been used...

I do keep a handy loaded 8 shot revolver in my shop loaded with Aguila SuperMax for unwelcome guests so the ammo does have a use... It has the energy level of a 380 auto... A soft bolt buffer might keep the ammo from cracking a aluminum carbine receiver but Im not going to test...
 

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I have a cracked 10/22 receiver and it cracked toward the front on both sides in 3 places very bad. Much like CPC is taking about. No cracks at the rear around the bolt stop on mine. And yes the stock will indeed hide the cracks for the most part so pull the stock and have a look.

This 10/22 was bought new in 1991. I noticed the 3 cracks in a little less than 2 years and less than 2500 rounds of ammo. Found them when I took it apart to clean after coming back from varmint hunting.

I did not run any Aguila ammo Thur mine, won't touch that stuff after their severe over pressure issues in some 308 ammo in the late 80s or early 90s.

I don't know for sure what cracked mine... but I long suspected the free floated heavy barrel I put on it when it was less than a year old had something to do with it. I wished I knew for sure. I no longer free float 10/22 heavy barrels.

I have another 10/22 with around 25,000 - 30,000 rounds thru it with no aftermarket recoil buffer, just the stock steel pin and no cracks in its receiver. So I don't think aftermarket recoil buffers are a must have.
 

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Gunsmithing 10/22's and 77/22"s since 1994 Phone 1-860-343-0552
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1,329 Posts
True, a heavy bull barrel free floated out of a aluminum receiver could certainly be too much, especially a full length barrel like 20 inches x .920 dia...
 

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CanuckShooter said:
So bull barrels are not usually free floated on 10/22's?

Do you use the pressure pad?

I am confused...lol
you do not free float a barrel on an aluminum receiver.it needs forward pressure from the stock.on a steel receiver you can free float if you desire.the aluninum isn't strong enough to support a barrel by itself.
 
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