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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cross post from community forum:

My scope is being refurbished and I've been given a choice of reticles. The scope goes on my CZ 452 American in .17 HMR. I think I'll go with a simple fine duplex, but a MilDot reticle could be very handy. Question is, is it practical for the .17HMR?

Thoughts?
 

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I have a mildot on my special and I love it. If you like to shoot longer ranges and get used to using the dots they work great. I'm thinking about putting one on my .223 now. I think they would be great on a .17.
 

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MilDot's are excellent

I bought a CZ 452 just to use a Sightron MilDot I already had. The cross hair width maybe more of a factor in selecting a reticle. I say that because I prefer my Weaver V16 fine cross hair for bench rest shooting, and the MilDot for hunting and plinking long distance targets. Fine cross hairs or small target dots can be hard to see in field conditions. A fine duplex, however, works great for both worlds.
 

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Hmmm, I posted a reply to this last night and now it isn't here! Anyhow here I go again...

There is no downside to getting the mil-dot - if you never use the dots you still have the crosshairs and the scope's resale value will be higher.

You can use the mildot to compensate for hold-over, wind, and moving targets without having to adjust zero. However you must learn how to use them. Hold over is the first thing to learn but also requires learning how to estimate range. Next you must learn the effects of wind at range and the effects on the bullet. Last you might learn about leading moving targets at range. Mildots are a great tool but they require skill to use.

Anther thing, many mildot reticles are in the second focal plane rather than the first. This means that the MOA value of the dots will vary depending on magnification and that the reticle appears the same size irrespective of magnification. Many mil-dots must be used at a particular magnification - say 10x for the system to work.

Weaver made or makes a first plane mil-dot scope where the dots cover the same angular area and work at all magnifications. However this means that the reticle will appear to get larger at higher magnifications.

Anyhow get the mil-dot but don't forget to learn how to use it.
 

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FWIW, on my CZ .17 HMR, I have a Nikko 10 X 42 sniper scope with mil dot reticle.

Zeroes at 35 yards, second zero is 125 yards. Rise between first & second zero is about .8 of an inch. Drop at 200 yards is 7 inches. One mil dot at 200 yards is 7.2 inches. I like the mil dot. Makes things easy. Problem is with zoom scopes, the distance does vary with the zoom, so it is a bit pointless, unless your top zoom is 10 X, or you get used to useing one focal length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I went with the fine duplex reticle and had Leupold tune the target turrets to 1/3 minute adjustment at 100 yards. The Mildot was tempting, but "busy" as someone else put it.

FWIW...AccuRat
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The turrets came from the factory with 1/2 minute clicks. I sent the scope to Leupold to replace the reticle and asked them if they could adjust the turrets to 1/4 minute clicks for me. For some reason, the best they can do with these particular turrets is 1/3 minute.
 
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