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Crosspost from community forum:

My scope is being refurbished and I've been given a choice of reticles. The scope goes on my CZ 452 American in .17 HMR. I think I'll go with a simple fine duplex, but a MilDot reticle could be very handy. Question is, is it practical for the .17HMR?

Thoughts?
 

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The purpose of the mil-dot is to provide points of reference for hold overs at different ranges, adjustments for wind and leads on moving targets without having to adjust zero.

Whether it is practical is more of an issue for you rather than the gun. To use it you will need to pick a zero and then learn the effects of wind and distance so you can use the right dot to put the bullet on target.

If you are into silhouette you might learn how to use them for the different ranges.

Be aware also that the moa value of the dots in most scopes will vary depending on magnification so they will be useful only at one magnification.

There is no downside to the mil-dot - if you never learn how to use the dots it still has a crosshair in the middle and looks much cooler than a duplex. It probably has a better resale value too.
 

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I, too, am a fan of MilDot reticles.

Even if you do not use it to range with, they are nice for quick minor holdovers with respect to elevation and windage. Very handy to make wind adjustments.

If you do decide to range with it, you will need to check calibration at the manufacturer specified magnification. Minor adjustments in power are often necessary to insure accuracy. The task is rather simple and I would be more than happy to assist if you so decide.

Additionally, a MilDot Master, (a MilDot calculator, if you will), is an excellent tool to help ranging calculations. Well worth the $30.

Good luck.
 

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Brookie said:
The purpose of the mil-dot is to provide points of reference for hold overs at different ranges, adjustments for wind and leads on moving targets without having to adjust zero.

Whether it is practical is more of an issue for you rather than the gun. To use it you will need to pick a zero and then learn the effects of wind and distance so you can use the right dot to put the bullet on target.

If you are into silhouette you might learn how to use them for the different ranges.

Be aware also that the moa value of the dots in most scopes will vary depending on magnification so they will be useful only at one magnification.

There is no downside to the mil-dot - if you never learn how to use the dots it still has a crosshair in the middle and looks much cooler than a duplex. It probably has a better resale value too.
Actually the main purpose of the mildot system is for range estimation. However, it can also be used for holding off and lead.
 

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Hi AccuRat:

Well, the best one is the one YOU like, all of them have some advantage, and I really like the mildot, but I always end up with the duplex, because that is the one I really like, go figure.

Jim
 

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It is pretty tough to beat a fine duplex or standard duplex for all around versatility.

Quick and natural target acquisition under a variety of lighting conditions and target backgrounds.

I would think they are the most commonly used reticle.

No flies on the duplex.
 
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