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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
John...Your's and others' comments about the 504 and your experience with a variety of rimfires has been interesting and a great resource...and often consistent with my own experiences.

Lately, none of my rifles has performed particularly well, regardless of conditions, scope or ammo...and I'm beginning to believe that the trouble lies as much with how I'm holding the gun as it is with the gun itself. As I've aged, there are more neck and shoulder pains and naturally, you adjust the way you crawl into a gun to accomodate how you feel...the fact of vision notwithstanding.

You wrote recently about your 504 shooting better with a firm front-end hold and I've found that mine, too, is sensitive in that manner. I've also considered the issue of parallax, but wondered if others have found that the fact of how you hold the gun is as important to the way it shoots...as what you shoot in it?

If this is the case, I may someday enlarge and frame the photographs of my best groups from the past as a fond remembrance!

Best to you all...
6Bucks
 

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Picher Posts

From time to time, I revisit Picher's posts ... John is a wealth of knowlege in aspects of precision shooting ...

As a result of his post on "hold", I did some experimenting with "hold" when shooting this morning and found a rifle likes a particular "hold" along with a particular ammunition !

Many of Johns posts cause one to think, remember, and realize the importance of some very basic shooting skills which may have been forgotten ! :t
 

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I don't "hold" the forearm in the front rest but have found that when I forget to reposition the forearm against the stop the same every time it sure makes a difference. I get to thinking there isn't enough recoil in a .22 to move it back but there sure is and it doesn't take much. Shooting centerfires it's easier to remember, especially the bigger ones... I never forget with the .300 H&H 721.... get a good reminder every time :D .
 

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6 Bucks and others:

Being 61 and having a few aches and pains, I can appreciate your physical problems in shooting. A friend from MA shoots benchrest with a rig that is very high and it allows him to sit almost vertical behind the rifle.

I'd suggest that you try to use some concrete patio blocks or other means of getting your rest and rear bag higher. That way you won't have to lean over to shoot. If you're not comfortable, you won't be able to shoot long strings or multiple targets at a match.

If you shoot with only one eye open, it increases eye strain. If you can't shoot with both eyes open (I use the left one to look at my wind flags), place something over your left shooting lens so you're not distracted. It's also important to have your scope adjusted perfectly for your vision, otherwise your eyes will get tired quickly and the image will blur. A 8x+ centerfire scope is difficult to use at 50 yards or less unless it has a parallax adjustment. Sometimes the objective lens on hunting scopes can be turned to focus/reduce parallax at closer range. A special spanner is needed to make the adjustment, but I've done it on a couple of scopes.

If necessary, have your eyes checked and get new glasses. For example, if you're over 40, your optometrist and/or optician can prescribe special lenses to help you see the front sight on a pistol more clearly. Yesterday, I had some difficulty in seeing the front sight on a carbine, but can clearly see the post on my 28"-barrelled Winchester.

We're not as young as we once were, but with some adjustments, might be able to enjoy shooting for a long time to come.

Picher

P.S. Thanks for the kind words.
 

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I also raised my rest to help with getting more comfortable. My front adjusted high enough, but for the rear bag, I rapped an old towel around a piece of 1x6 and stapled it on to get higher. The extra inch sure made a difference (Before anyone corrects me, I know a 1x6 is only 3/4" but it is a piece of fencing lumber, rough on one side and with the towel, it's at least an inch).

For Picher,
"I'm Not As Good As I Once Was, But I'm As Good Once As I Ever Was!" like Toby Keith says :D !!
 

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grandparem said:
I also raised my rest to help with getting more comfortable. My front adjusted high enough, but for the rear bag, I rapped an old towel around a piece of 1x6 and stapled it on to get higher. The extra inch sure made a difference (Before anyone corrects me, I know a 1x6 is only 3/4" but it is a piece of fencing lumber, rough on one side and with the towel, it's at least an inch).

For Picher,
"I'm Not As Good As I Once Was, But I'm As Good Once As I Ever Was!" like Toby Keith says :D !!
Toby: At my age, I'm not even quite as good ONCE! But still good enough!
;)

Granparem: I like to have a fairly firm rear bag, so I use a doughnut bag to set my stiff Bald Eagle rear bag. For my bench rifle, the front bag is only about 5/8" thick and is on a Hohen windage-adjustable top on a Hart base. For my sporter and hunting rifle shooting, I use a softer leather front bag in a modified Hoppe's rest that fits into my shooting bag. I find that sand bag firmness helps with consistency.

I also never move the rear bag when shooting benchrest targets because it changes the POI. If the front rest is adjusted for height on each row, POI remains much more consistent from the top to the bottom rows of bulls. I also have a speed screw in the rear leg of the Hart rest, but only use it for fine vertical adjustment when adjusting within a row, not for going between rows. It changes the angle of the rest and moves the top farther away as it lifts the rear leg.

Picher
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the great posts...interesting stuff from all of you. I think someone else mentioned eyesight and that's really a factor, especially as Picher says, in focusing the scope. You know it's not good when you see two targets downrange through your scope.

I tend to think that hold has a lot to do with my lack of accuracy. I'm prone to have three excellent shots, then have one that stikes an inch low, with what I perceive as the same POA. When that happens you tend to change your hold while trying harder to achieve a correct sight picture...like a monkey making out with a football...and then things get worse. Realizing that my sight is not what it was, I'm fine with not being a guerilla marksman...but I would like to know that I have the gun properly zeroed, and you can't when you have such inconsistency.

Thankfully, some days are better than others...even when you're getting older. I'm thankful I can still wear boxers...and hope to for years to come, regardless of how I shoot!

Keep it fun,
6Bucks
 
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