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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Plese don't start an argument, but I have a question regarding quality of machining. Two of my relatives and some friends had Ruger pistols which are very nice guns. I purchased two with poor results and wonder just how good quality control is at the factory.

Several years ago, we purchases a SP-101 .22 revolver. Fired casings stuck in the chambers and the extractor had to be hammered to eject. It was sent to the factory and returned with the same problem. I have polished the chambers and helped but not cured the problem.

I purchased a Mklll pistol which looked like it had been machined by a semi-trained monkey. Firing it required work to remove stovepipes with many brands of ammo tried. I see posts where someone is recommended to fire up to two or more bricks to help ejection which is ridiculous with the machining equipment available to industry today.

Purchasing an item and then having to pay shipment to have defects repaired makes a firearm excessively expensive. Did I just get two bad examples or have others faced the same situations? Both of these were new in the box.
 

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Honestly Ive never had any problems with getting problems fixed with Ruger. If its a new gun and has manufacturing defects I would call them and complain! Have them pay the shipping! Ive had them send me a shipping container with the postage paid before, they usally wont do that with an older gun, but for a new one they should.
 

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Ruger custmer service is number one. I have broken my 22\45 AND it was my fault. I sent them the gun, they replaced the part, cleaned it and sent it back and all i had to pay was shipping. THEY will do you right. and i have also had problems with cheap brass in a revolver. The brass was soft and would expand and get stuck in the gun, I would have to let the brass cool down in order to get it out, changed brass and it never happened again!
 

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I bought 2 MKIII 22/45s at the same time.
They have significantly different quality issues.
One has a really smooth trigger (wouldn't even try to replace it), and the other has creep issues and a sticky spot.
The one with the nice trigger ejected all mags I have without hesitation.
The other took field stripping and filing to even get close.

Quality issue? Absolutely!
Filing the mag chamber took care of that, and dry firing the pistol has settled down the trigger issues.

Would I send it back? Not yet. The fixes were too easy.
 

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In over two dozen Rugers that have passed through my hands, I only had trouble with one. However, problem children do sometimes hit the streets and I agree it's an expensive pain to have to send one back. Usually Ruger will send you a prepaid package though. Ruger has always been the working man's gun leaving a little to be desired in the fit and finish department. They're still a good value in today's market.
 

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I've owned lots of Rugers! Two in fact. :D
The first was an original Standard model to which I added Millet sights. It had a rotten trigger but otherwise it was as reliable as any semi auto I've ever owned or shot. My second and current one is a MKII KMK512. It has a very good trigger and eats anything from subsonics to Stingers without a hitch.
 

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I have a new MK Target and the only problem I had was ammo related. Once I changed that I have had no more problems. I am really liking this pistol.

I think they are on par with most and way above some others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. Guess there must have been a black cloud over my purchases.

I got rid of the Mklll, but the SP-101 is still with us. It doesn't seem to make any difference what cartridges I use, they all stick. Shells from the same boxes eject easily from Colt and SW 17 revolvers, so the cartridge cases are fine. I will polish the chambers some more and hopefully fully clear up the issue. It is a great tackle box gun and easilly cleaned.

After the problems with the revolver, I did not want to hassle with the factory. Shipping was not offered by the factory, so I was reluctant to send back on my money again after the experience with the revolver.

The actual design of both models is fine, as Bill Ruger was a great designer.
 

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I guess I've been lucky. I have a new MKIII Hunter, MKIII 22/45 and Single Six and a used MKII GC. The only problem I've had was the sight screw on the Hunter needed to be cleaned and treated with loctite to keep it from loosening up.
 

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I don't even know how many Rugers I've had over the years, but it's a bunch of them. I've got seven now, and haven't had the first problem with any of them. That's not to say they've never jammed or anything, but it's seldom enough that I can't blame the gun. My MK III, 22/45 got to jamming one day, but a couple of drops of oil cured it. It was dry as a bone before that.

I had to send one back to the factory about twenty years ago. A Security-Six SS 357 revolver. The barrel cylinder gap was too tight (at least that's what the letter they sent back said.) and it would bind up after about 50 rounds. I took it back to my dealer, he shipped it back to Ruger (I have no idea who paid for the shipping, I didn't.). The gun came back in a few weeks, fixed. No more problems.

To be honest, that is the only problem I've ever had with a gun that I could blame on the gun.
 

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frankc, as stated above, it sounds like you got a couple of lemons. Ruger does have good customer service, except they are know to return everything to factory specs, which means any quality aftermarket parts will be replaced with factory parts. You can't blame them for doing this for liability reasons, but you just need to be aware of it.
Ruger's quality overall is very good, but most of their guns are made to fill a niche where they provide a quality gun at a reasonable price. If you want something of greater quality it will cost you more than many people are willing to pay.
 

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I've been through a number of 22/25's, MKII's and one MKI. The only problem I can recall right now was a bad 22/45 mag that Ruger replaced without a hassle. There have been a few front sight screws that worked loose, but that sort of thing happens to all brands................chim
 

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Last fall I came across a MKII GC at a gun show at a really good price. The pistol looked like it had seen very little use. Went straight from the gun show to the range. It didn't shoot with the accuracy I expected and had some ammo feed problems. Figured I'd just bought someone's problem. Took it home, gave it a thorough cleaning, disassembled and cleaned the mags, gave it a very light coat of oil. Next time out, it fired flawlessly and very accurately. I've always wondered if I have someone's problem that just needed a smidge of TLC.
 
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