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Purchased a Victor this morning

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Think I got an OK deal. No box and only one mag and no barrel weights (already sounding bad :) ).
In any event gun is a East Hampton model with serial SH24565. Fellow forum member had advised me on what serials made up the Houston range and so walked in with that information.
As stated is just a pistol and a magazine.
Took me a while to figure out mag release.
Finish is pretty darn nice. Did look it over for any signs of fractures on the slide. I did not see any.
Price was $750. There was no negotiation as the pistol was on consignment..
Looking forward to trying it out and perhaps finding a weight for it.
No doubt you guys will tell me the folly of my ways on this one which is why we have forums like this.
But after getting my Supermatic and shooting it and being told that the Victor might be even a better target pistol, I took the opportunity to get one.

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While I may not have chosen a SH (other than the X model) the gun chosen looks nice. That's probably because it was an earlier SH. Remember a few things with any Hi Std target gun:
Use only Standard Velocity ammo (box rated at about 1080 FPS for 40 gr bullet)**
Replace the recoil spring initially and every 10 to 15 thousand rounds there after
Use either the OEM 5.5 pound spring or the variable rate 6 pound Wolff spring
Keep that takedown screw tight
Original mags and Interarms Texas mags are best and Triple K mags are problems
Use Interarms Texas (Alan Aronstein ) for service and parts

For any model after the 107, the location of the factory would be East Hartford or Hamden. Over the years the Connecticut company moved multiple times. But ML and SH models would only have been marked as made in one of those two locations. SH would only be East Hartford.

LDBennett
** CCI Standard velocity is a relatively inexpensive choice and is the choice of many Bullseye shooters. It is accurate, relatively less expensive, reliable and has been in the past relatively easy to find.
 

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Alan can provide his mags or adjust yours. These guns have only a vestige of a feed ramp (unlike most modern guns). And the mag must present the bullet nose to the chamber perfectly to get reliable feeding. The hitting of the bullet nose to the top edge of the chamber is a definite sign that the mag lips need attention.

As for the Houston guns, the early ones had problems that eventually were solved by Alan during production. My early Texas Trophy looked great but had serious feeding problems due to a frame casting problem. Alan changed it out in the day and the latest frames were excellent. Mine now has the stainless frame with a blued slide and shoots fantastically. Alan also corrected some of the crude early fitting by his then new employees. The gun is now excellent.

I also have an ML East Hartford Victor. It looks great and shoots great (as does the Houston Trophy). Very early Hamden guns differ from my ML only in the polishing of the frame and slide. Collectors differentiate between Hamden and East Hartford guns but the reality is, all Hi Std target guns out shoot the shooters. ML's are the bargain shooter guns of the Hi Std family. Collectors march to a different tune!

LDBennett
 

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So John, you are saying that at some point High Standard maintained two facilities (East Hartford and Hamden) and that some SH guns were marked with either adress? And are you saying some ML (East Hartford 107's) carried SH serial numbers (with or without the SH marking)? In the last days of Connecticut High Standard is it possible that they were using up previously marked or problem parts from Hamden days and in their haste to close up shop mistakes were made in the markings of serial numbers?

All this serial number markings issues is meaningless to shooters. I think the poster is a shooter not a collector and as long as the gun shoots well and is presentable for fit and finish, I suspect he will find the gun to his liking! The accuracy over the years, regardless of the manufacturing at various locations, has always been stellar. Fit and finish may have varied but in most cases over the years these guns have been an excellent choice for a target gun. Just my opinion and other's opinions may vary.

LDBennett
 

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For magazines, original real Hi Std magazines have not been problematical, in general. Latest Interarms Texas magazines have the same reputation once tuned to the gun. The problem mags have been the Triple K mags with their un-hardened feed lips that MAY loose their tune quickly with use.
LDBennett
 

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John:
Thank you for the insight. I suspected, based on your previous posts here over the years, that it was using up left over parts. My first impression of your post was that both facilities were open for years and not just in the move time. That is why I questioned you. I got it now.

Any production thing made by man has variation including in gun accuracy. Barrels vary. I would love to have a 10-X just to compare its accuracy in my hands to my other Hi Std guns. But at the prices for them I would not bother to even search for one. Besides my gun skills at 80 years old is not what it use to be (really bad eyesight) and the comparison would be flawed.

I am sorry that I distinguish between collectors and shooter, even though you do not. Shooters are performance oriented (just look at the somewhat crude appearance of the 10-X guns). Meanwhile collectors are after the highly polished models and rarer models. No offense meant to you but collectors elevate pricing for these guns through demand. If these guns were not in demand then the prices would follow other less desirable target guns. But it is what it is and I have just three (Supermatic Field King, a Texas Trophy, and a ML Victor). The later two are regular shooters. The first one was bought off a friend as my first Hi Std and it is not going anywhere while I am still alive. It shows honest carry wear as the owner was a farmer and carried it often in a holster...the price was right at the time.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

LDBennett
 

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For those of you unaware, the progression of facilities (as well as owners) over the last four decades was Connecticut then new High Standard of Houston TX. Alan was part of the TX effort as the design and production guy for a couple decades. The let him go then they went bankrupt. Some of the directors snatched up some of the asset and took them to Montana or Wyoming (?). That group tried to do business there but I never heard what happened to them. Alan bought Interarms and started up Interarms Texas where today he does Hi Std parts and service. He now rents out the former High Standard Houston Texas facility from the original landlord. Seems in the haste of the former directors to leave Texas (perhaps against the rulings of the Texas bankruptcy court??) they left behind a bunch of “trash” that Alan keeps find goodies in.

His former gunsmiths for the Texas firm started their own business where they now produce a new version of the Hi Std 10-X. Alan is associated with them (somehow?). He acts as a sales agent taking orders for them. I think he also provides them new parts as well (??).

Alan probably is the most knowledgable Hi Std person for repairs and produces some new parts including new magazines. Those magazines are superior to the common Triple K magazines because of hardened feed lips and his factory lip tuning. Alan is always helpful and well invested in the High Standard world for collectors and shooters.

LDBennett
 
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