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Purchased a Victor this morning

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Think I got an OK deal. No box and only one mag and no barrel weights (already sounding bad :) ).
In any event gun is a East Hampton model with serial SH24565. Fellow forum member had advised me on what serials made up the Houston range and so walked in with that information.
As stated is just a pistol and a magazine.
Took me a while to figure out mag release.
Finish is pretty darn nice. Did look it over for any signs of fractures on the slide. I did not see any.
Price was $750. There was no negotiation as the pistol was on consignment..
Looking forward to trying it out and perhaps finding a weight for it.
No doubt you guys will tell me the folly of my ways on this one which is why we have forums like this.
But after getting my Supermatic and shooting it and being told that the Victor might be even a better target pistol, I took the opportunity to get one.

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While I may not have chosen a SH (other than the X model) the gun chosen looks nice. That's probably because it was an earlier SH. Remember a few things with any Hi Std target gun:
Use only Standard Velocity ammo (box rated at about 1080 FPS for 40 gr bullet)**
Replace the recoil spring initially and every 10 to 15 thousand rounds there after
Use either the OEM 5.5 pound spring or the variable rate 6 pound Wolff spring
Keep that takedown screw tight
Original mags and Interarms Texas mags are best and Triple K mags are problems
Use Interarms Texas (Alan Aronstein ) for service and parts

For any model after the 107, the location of the factory would be East Hartford or Hamden. Over the years the Connecticut company moved multiple times. But ML and SH models would only have been marked as made in one of those two locations. SH would only be East Hartford.

LDBennett
** CCI Standard velocity is a relatively inexpensive choice and is the choice of many Bullseye shooters. It is accurate, relatively less expensive, reliable and has been in the past relatively easy to find.
During the later part of the SH serial numbers there were models included in that group that were only manufactured in Hamden. It is difficult to make a simple declaritive statement that doesn't have an exception when talking about High Standard guns. Here were east Hartford 107s in the SH serial number range. I have a 107 series Victor with an SH serial number and have found a number of others through my research.
 

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I was jokingly suggesting to myself after post purchase research discovered the possible err of my ways in acquiring the SH model that some of you super knowledgeable HS guys should create a simple chart for each model indicating best to worst to acquire.
Any such list would be purely subjective and not necessarily one that everyone would agree on. My experiences will not necessarily agree with others. My experiences with magazines is very different from most peoples. I have not had feeding problems with High Stadnard magazines and there is a lot of talk about adjusting magazines on this and other forums. My experience is pretty broad as I have fired probably 150 High Standard pistols from my collection even larger collection. My excperience is not limited to the .22 pistols as I have a few 9mm pistols amd some semi auto centerfire rifles.
 

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So John, you are saying that at some point High Standard maintained two facilities (East Hartford and Hamden) and that some SH guns were marked with either adress? And are you saying some ML (East Hartford 107's) carried SH serial numbers (with or without the SH marking)? In the last days of Connecticut High Standard is it possible that they were using up previously marked or problem parts from Hamden days and in their haste to close up shop mistakes were made in the markings of serial numbers?

All this serial number markings issues is meaningless to shooters. I think the poster is a shooter not a collector and as long as the gun shoots well and is presentable for fit and finish, I suspect he will find the gun to his liking! The accuracy over the years, regardless of the manufacturing at various locations, has always been stellar. Fit and finish may have varied but in most cases over the years these guns have been an excellent choice for a target gun. Just my opinion and other's opinions may vary.

LDBennett
For the large pushbutton guns they only maintained facilities in two cities in 1977 during the transition.
Slant grip guns were basically discontinued in Hamden but some leftover parts were used to complete small numbers in 1978 after HSI took over ownership. The Military grip guns first assembled in East Hartford used up old Hamden marked barrels and this practice was again repeated in early 1978 when the company ownership changed.

It is most likely that they were not mismarking parts but rather using previously marked parts.

You would be surprised by the number of target shooters who have requested the ship date and configuration of their guns. Some do care.

The accuracy while it has always been setllar there was always some variation, but as the manufacuring methods changed so did the accuracy. I have a memo from Gary Wilhelm about that very issue. When they were selecting a barrel for the fluted barrel 104 series Supermatic Trophy to be sent to the NRA for evaluation , they target tested moer than a few barrels. I have the targets. The NRA review was very favorable especially since they got a very good barrel. If there had been no variability they would not have had to use target tested barrels for the much later MODEL 10-X.

I am certainly not going to treat shooters and collectors differently or try to guess what they really want to know. I provide what information I can and they can do with it what the want.
 
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