Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,977 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Following are some photos of the test gun to show it's current condition and how the parts have worn, and modifications.

What a mess, 2000 cases scattered across the floor from yesterdays shooting. All this at my office range and I didn't hit the building once. By the way this is a legal shooting range in case anyone is concerned. I never shoot when anyone is around either. I always wear ear protection and eye protection. You should also.

photo of the barrel sleeve and lack of wear, barely any blueing worn off. This photo also has the moly/teflon removed as the gun was cleaned.

Photo of left rail showing only some of the finish worn off. There is no metal removed from day one as measurements are exactly the same as new. The outside of the rail isn't important, it's that underside particularly at the rear end. This is because the bearing surface is reduced as the slide travels rearward.

Photo of the right rail showing no wear.

Photo of the hammer/sear area. Notice the rounded hammer and the amount of metal distortion to the "little hump".

photo showing the chamber. Ramp never polished, notice the rounded disconnect ears and the wear to the slide lock even though all slide releases were made by pulling the slide back before release which allows the slide stop to drop before the slide is released.

photo showing the underside of the slide. Notice where the disconnect ears pound the slide, also notice where the slide release mechanism drags on the slide. This occurs on the final round as the lock is pushed up against the slide by the now empty magazine and it's follower button positioning the stop to be waiting to pop up into into the catch slot. You might also be able to tell where I took about .020" off the bottom of the rear of the breech block to give the hammer more clearance and reduce drag.

Think I will post part 2 separately before I loose all this with my inept computer skills. 1911M
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,977 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lyricsdad, if yours is looking this good after 20,000 by all means give us some photos as well as cleaning procedure, frequency, ammo shot, lubricant used, etc. Thanks 1911M I never did get the stabilizer end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I'll have to get some pics of mine too.

I would have to guess that I have between 5,000 and 10,000 rounds through mine... its been almost exactly a year and I had several days going through a whole box of 550 of the Federal Bulk stuff.

Mine has a hell of alot more bluing wear on it though. I'm not sure if its that I have always used oil on it or the ammo I'm using or what. I'll see if I can get some pics up later tonight.

Gotta watch CSI with the woman first.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,977 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would be good if some other shooters kind of kept track of how many rounds they've fired and actually take some measurements of critical wear points. I've posted the test gun measurements, new and used. 1911M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
1917-1911M said:
lyricsdad, if yours is looking this good after 20,000 by all means give us some photos as well as cleaning procedure, frequency, ammo shot, lubricant used, etc. Thanks 1911M I never did get the stabilizer end.
I posted a while back what I have done w/ mine. The procedures. etc.

I did get a new stabilizer from S&W. so I am happy.

Here are my procedures.

1. I have the 5 inch barrel. I remove the stablizer. clean the end w/ either "gun scrubber" or hopps number 9.

2. remove the slide, spring. I use a soaked cleaning patch and wipe them down. lay them to the side. I then use another patch w/ solvent on it, and whipe the barrel, the ramp, and other parts like the slide rails, etc down getting them all nice and shiny.

3. I run my .22 boresnake once down the barrel. Sometimes twice.

4. I use my .12 gauge puffy thing and clean inside the grip where the magazine goes. sometimes I will put a soaked patch on it and push it through. matters if I shoot like 1000 or so rounds through it.

5. I use a newly soaked patch, and wipe the inside of the slide, getting all that powder broken down, the receiver is throughly cleaned. I wipe rear where the hammer smacks the slide. the inside of the slide rails. if it is really grungy (the slide), I use a toothbrush soaked in the hopps.

6. I usually wash my hands here as I wait for the solvent to dry up a little bit. I hate that smell. I then take a dry patch or dry patches and wipe up the access hopps solvent.

7. after the pistol is dry and no oily substance is left from the hopps no. 9. usually have to work a little harder w/ gun scrubber. but I make sure it is dry.

8. I then use remmington rem-oil w/ teflon. I have been using this since I was ten to oil all my firearms. w/ my p22 I put it on a patch and wipe the slide rails down, the ejector, the inside of the slide which includes the inside slide rail. Sometimes I put a drop on that button inside the slide and push on it a few times to get a little penetration. I then wipe up all the access. I make sure the oil is dried up. My Daddy told me what made this oil (rem-oil) so special is that even when it dried up, it would leave the teflon behind making your firearm still protected when it is gone. (I took that hint after mayber the first 500 rounds of mine when I started to have wear on my frame. That little button pusher thing. I posted photos here before somewhere...)

So my key to success w/ my p22 is. I make sure I clean it every time I shoot it. I make sure I "dry lube" it. I put my oil on by wiping a thin layer on so thin that its semi dry. which i am sure it is dry when i fire it next time.

I am on vacation, so I will have to go to work and get my digital camera. I could use my phone but that thing makes crappy photos that are so small its unbearable to view them.

My slide wear is similar to yours 1911, one side seems to wear more than the other. and I have more blue wear on my barrel.

I like it. I would like to get a sig mosquito or a nice rugar mkIII to relieve my p22 of its plinking duties for a while and give her a rest. I want to keep it for many more years to come. I would get another one but, it scares me that everyone has all these problems, and I dont want to purchase another p22 only find out that my original pistol was one of those rare birds that is flawless, and my second one is a lemon. But I have then purchased a p99 and I have no problems either with that pistol. So, I guess after typing this I would purchase another p22 if the price was right. But a sig mosquito would be preferred over another p22 ;)

Or one of those beautiful MKIII hunters....

Pics coming soon.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,977 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Crete, all that sounds good, I can't believe a really dirty gun can in any situation be better than a clean one. Sound like you are essentially ending up with a "dry" teflon coated gun and that seems to be a good solution.

Mine gets the teflon treatment everywhere except heavy wear points. Perhaps regular teflon cleaning would serve the same purpose, I can't test everything on one gun so it's good to hear from others.

I've read this entire Walther section and all posts and it's amazing what we have learned since the early days. I would still like for you and others to document the dimensions of critical slide components. Groove/rails.

That wear I show on the outside of the rail is not really important unless the rail is totally wearing away. What is important is the bottom edge of the rails and the bottom edge of the slide groove. These are the bearing surfaces that slide on each other under pressure as the hammer lifts the slide. Wear here can cause big problems.

Compressed air is a real time saver for blowing out powder and excess lubricant if you have a source. You can buy it by the can. Probably not as powerful as the 120 PSI I use. I expect blueing wear on the barrel sleeve has absolutely nothing to do with longevity and I only show it to illustrate how well the moly/teflon lubes.

Get a caliper if you get a chance, $30 to $40 and they are really handy for all sorts of measurements you might want to know about, guns, car parts, the items are endless. Unless you are actually measuring these things you can only tell if there is a problem if something doesn't work right. A few thousands of an inch isn't much but it is good to try to nip something in the bud before it becomes a problem. 1911M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
P22 Tear and Wear

Actually, since I have been using Teflon Dry-Lube since day one, my P22 has no wear and tear worth writing home about.

Just the slide catch, which holds the slide open after the last round, shows the same wear as that on your latest pickies. No big deal, in other words.

You need a microscope to find any lube on my P22. It is as dry-looking as the Sahara desert viewed from Space.

The only other visible wear I can report, and make you all laugh, is that after replacing the hammer assembly, the newly-fitted Walther-factory supplied replacement unit features a non-wearable satin black finish [unlike that of the original hammer, which had become silvery shiny at irregular spots where it hit the firing pin or the firing pin blocking rod during dry firing with the safety on], and a couple of bricks later it still looks as good as new. The original wore out as soon I started shooting.

BTW, following my performed complete disassembly, my P22 shoots better than ever. I simply cleaned the internals as best as I could and squirted a bit of Teflon spray in there, before reassembling. I wiped all excess Teflon with a Q-Tip and presto!

This sort of dis-, re-assembly P22-exercise is highly recommended to all for a truly reliable performance, me thinks. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Question... how are you guys releasing the slide? Are you pushing the slide lock or are you pulling it back and letting it snap forward? The reason I ask is that I don't have wear on my slide or slide lock, mainly because I sling shot the slide instead of pushing the button.

I actually modified the slide lock (or slide release) and pinched it flat against the frame (much like a Glock).

I think that is why yours could be wore down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts


I made a collage using picasa from google. I realized my home computer does not have any imaging software on it.. so I had to find something because i know a 5 megapixel file would have been a bummer for dialup users to download.

Here they are, only wear I experienced is the little nub that pushes the button inside of the slide. I experienced that wear during the first 500 maybe 10000 rounds i was overoiling my pistol, I also experienced safety walk from that. I had stopped overoiling it and have not experienced the safety walk yet.

I am happy w/ mine so far.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,977 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pictures are too small to really see details. looks like the gun is in good shape. The wear we are talking about doesn't have to be much on that slide.
I'm not really worried about the slide stop wear, S&W will send another free I expect. I would like a gun that is engineered to fire 100,000 rounds w/out much maintenance though and w/out the owner having to modify. Perhaps Walther will listen to some of our solutions and correct the few things that would solve these recurring problems.

To much lube didn't cause the ding on the safety disconnect bump, that is normal. Remember a new slide is $50 from S&W if they decide to charge you for it. Not bad after 40,000 rounds or so if we can make them last that long. Currently I believe they are good for that and I believe Walther might already be hardening some parts based on Crete's comments above and the new harder than diamond extractors I just received.

There are going to be trade offs with a light weight modern design pistol. I like this thing or I wouldn't have purchased a second after the miserable service of the first one. I am also buying another from a member in N.C. just as soon as we get all the paperwork done. **** terrorists, making everything difficult for honest citizens. Everything wears out but 4000 rounds is not enough and this is not an inexpensive gun as some keep suggesting. It is as expensive as it's competitors.

I will withhold judgement on the Sig Mosquito until I see some shooting experience by our fine members. I'm definitely thinking dry lube though.
1911M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I have the full 5 mp photos if you would like to see them i could email a few to you. Like I said, I have no imaging software on this computer. Since I had the last 2 weeks off. I never brought my laptop home.

Yeah i agree, its not inexpensive.. I feel 250-300 bucks is still alot. I mean I could buy alot of clothes for my kids w/ that. So go figure. I like my p22. I wish it was built w/ the same materials as the p99 though.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top