Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner

Old Folk Tale true for Hardwinter???

474 8
Ok,

So I have helped skin around a dozen whitetail deer this year, and every single one has had more fat than usuall. One doe that my uncle shot, had an 1.5 in. of fat on her rump. Come on :eek:

I took the hide off of a 2 year old fork horn and it was overly fat.

Lots of old timers say, that means we are in for a hard winter. I saw in another post by Plinker (I think) about all the acorns on the ground still and how it means we are in for a hard winter. I can still find quite a few acorns in some areas.

What do ya'll think?

Dean_311
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I think the blame for these corpulent deer should fall squarely on the shoulders of McDonalds.

For years deer have eaten McDonalds' food and for years McDonalds has slowly increased its portion size. This, coupled with poor availability of nutritional information to the deer population in general, has brought about the obesity we now see running rampant throughout all of deerdom.

I propose a class action lawsuit on behalf of all medium to large quadrapeds in North America. We can only hope that it isn't too late.




Of course we could also be in for a cold winter, but we shouldn't let that stand in our way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Someone in the persimmon thread reminded me of yet another indicator of winter severity.

Supposedly, if you cut a persimmon seed in half you'll see either a spoon or a fork inside (some darkened pattern inside the seed). One or the other means a tough winter, but I don't know which.

There is also the height of hornet's nests. If they build them high in the trees it is supposed to be severe, low means it will be mild.

I have no idea how persimmons or hornets know about winter though. Maybe I should ask them about the lottery numbers.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top