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Cradle position is irrelevant, all that needs to be level (left to right) is the rifle, and then the rings, and finally the scope itself.

It is the relationship from rifle to rings to scope that matters to get the scope cross hairs square with the rifle.

I prefer not to do things by eye, using an instrument of some sort is preferable for me.
sparx
In a bench rest environment, you can make a case for your point here. But, again, in a BR match, the shooter is going to adjust as necessary before shooting record shots. My point is, if you want the reticle to be reasonably square when shooting, then the hold of the rifle is central to that, which, sort of by definition, has to be done by eye, since few of us hold perfectly perpendicular to the ground. It's an interesting discussion, although maybe more academic than practical. Where the error in orientation really matters, is in long distance shooting, since an error in elevation will also place the shot off left or right, so if your are clicking up or down, you need to know it's really moving on a true vertical plane. At modest distances, few of us can hold with enough precision to suffer from a small error in the reticle orientation.
 

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This was my first thought.
Never assume the ret is centered.
Given the procedure you have used to get a baseline- which should provide a decent starting point- along w/the amount of 'error' you're seeing, I also would recommend checking the mechanical center of the reticle before spending (possibly unnecessarily) on more rings. Costs nada and if nothing else will eliminate that as a possibility.
 

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Thanks for correcting me on the shim, after I thought about it during dinner I knew I was wrong and should use the rear sight adjustment rule as a guide.

I may check with Pyramid air and see about those rings.
This is too much error to be adjusting with only the scope.
sparx
I just looked, and Pyramyd has only the 30mm version. Ariguns of Arizona has them. They are double-strap rings, might be wider than you want. For the CZ application, I'd take another look at the Burris Signature rimfire rings, they should work. Or, you can get the J&P adapter and use the Burris Zee Signature, weaver mount version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I read it is not so good for a scope to turn adjustments to the limits, but I suppose if I am careful it will be ok.

How many clicks should I expect?

Thanks all.

It is tiring when new stuff needs this much attention...:banghead3

sparx
 

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I read it is not so good for a scope to turn adjustments to the limits, but I suppose if I am careful it will be ok.

How many clicks should I expect?

Thanks all.

It is tiring when new stuff needs this much attention...:banghead3

sparx
Just stop as soon as you feel any resistance and you will be fine. How many clicks depends on how much adjustment the erector has and how much adjustment each click provides. I've seen them from 1/8 MOA all the way up to 1/2 MOA. That said, I believe you are overthinking things. Chill out and enjoy your rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Just stop as soon as you feel any resistance and you will be fine. How many clicks depends on how much adjustment the erector has and how much adjustment each click provides. I've seen them from 1/8 MOA all the way up to 1/2 MOA. That said, I believe you are overthinking things. Chill out and enjoy your rifle.
I don't think 9" low at 50 yards is overthinking honestly.

I get tired of having to labor on new products.

Hell, I mounted a Nikon rimfire 2 on a chinese mauser trainer a few weeks back, which apparently is a copy of sorts of the cz452 and I was only required to make up a 1/2" at 50 yards. Problem was the bolt barely cleared the scope.

Anyway, time will tell maybe I'll sell this CZ set up and move on...

sparx
 

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Centering

Here's an old trick. Lay a mirror on the table in a brightly lit room. Stand the scope on it's objective on the mirror and look into it.Turn your adjustments until you only see one set of cross hairs.
 

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One thing not mentioned is the distance (clearance) of the barrel to the bottom of the scope. The higher the scope is sitting above the barrel will mean more adjustment will be needed. To take a new scope and install it without checking for crosshair centering is commonly done, even by me. The only time I check for centering is when I can't get enough adjustment to get a zero. May not be right but this is me. If I run out of adjustment the next step will be to work with the mounting system after centering the scope. Just a fact, but most scope installations will require making adjustments with some being major.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
I turned the "UP" knob 222 clicks before it hit resistance. Turned the same knob the other direction 187 clicks before it hit resistance.

Also, noticed resistance along the way which seeemed odd.

But since I turned the knob 222 clicks UP to hit max, shouldn't it be well over 222 clicks down to bottom in thus the opposite direction?

I also examined the windage knob and discovered the "up" knob was not in as pristine condition as the "R" knob, signs of finish wear on the "up" knob are evident. Who knows could be an issue with this scope.


sparx
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Ok, regardless of what has been said I mounted the Nikon Rimfire II on the CZ- it clears the bolt. Using the same Leupold rings in the very same location on the receiver.

Granted the bolt clearance is a little less than with the Weaver RV9 but it clears. The clearance with the RV9 was only about 3/32" greater.

I know the Nikon works fine, it was on the Norinco TU33 and needed little adjustment.

Tomorrow I will test this to see where POI is.

sparx







 

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I read it is not so good for a scope to turn adjustments to the limits, but I suppose if I am careful it will be ok.

How many clicks should I expect?

Thanks all.

It is tiring when new stuff needs this much attention...:banghead3

sparx
Well.....freedom of the press, you can read anything. This is not exactly urban legend, but not exactly true either. A quality scope can be used throughout its adjustment range without issue. Some people will report an increased amount of image distortion near the adjustment limit, maybe true in some cases. But the practical issue in trying to stay reasonably close to mechanical center is simply the remaining adjustment available, which can be a very practical consideration with respect to elevation. Extreme range or extreme trajectory (air rifle) will exacerbate this issue. If you are on zero at 25 yards with an air rifle generating 700 fps velocity, but you are within 20% of the maximum "up" elevation setting, then you are going to run out of adjustment at 50 or 75 yards. Same principle with any rifle at a certain range.

I would say you have had very good luck with "new stuff", as your current situation is very common and easily resolved.
 

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Centering the scope

Run your adjustment knobs one way or the other, until it hits the mechanical stop.

Then run the knob the opposite direction until it hits the stop in that dirction. Count the number of clicks (or graduations) it took to run from one stop to the other.

Back the knob back up, from the stop you're on, half of the total clicks that you counted. When you arrive at that point your scope should be at the center of the scopes mechanical, afjustment range.
From the center you should have an equal adjustment range in both +/- directions.

Do this for both elevation and windage knobs, THEN mount your scope.
Good Luck!
 
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