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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, I have a bit of a question. I'm looking to get another .22 rifle, just to have another .22 rifle. I currently have a Ruger 10/22 Carbine, in stock format. While the Ruger is a fun plinker, I've been contemplating something "nicer."

So I'm split. At work we have a little Model 60 in stainless with the carbon-fiber look stock, which is really neat in my eyes.

But I almost, not quite, came very close to buying a 39 after Christmas. (Bought a Kel-Tec pocket pistol instead... :rolleyes: ) I like the classic looks of the lever gun, and love the blued steel and walnut. Also, it goes with my 1894 .44 Magnum very nicely, not to mention the Single Six.

I'd like more accuracy than my 10/22, but I don't know as I'll notice much on practical accuracy differences. I am planning on irons, 'cause I like simple and light. And the fact that the Marlins are tube-feed instead of detachable mags means less stuff to keep track of when going out to camp. Otherwise, no specific need or purpose, I just want a neat .22 plinker.

So I figured I'd put it before the board. Which should I get? I'm still saving the money up, so no decision has been made!
 

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If you want a scoped rifle that you wouldn't worry about as much, I say the 60. If you want the classic thing the 60 just can't offer, then the 39 would be a great choice. I think 39's look better with out a scope, keeps the classic look going on (IMO).

For what it is worth, I have a 60 and love it. Excellent cheap gun. The 39 might hold it's value more though (if that matters to you).
 

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a 60, if accuracy is going to be your biggest criteria filler, is the deal. without a scope they will smoke a 10.22 with a small power scope, even at 100 yds, with a hi power scope, you could shoot sub moa at 100 yds, proly with 5 or 10 diff types of ammo. Not every 60 will do this, but even if yours doesn't , I bet it will come **** close.
Ohterwise, I'd pop for the 39, a total classic, and never, ever , goes down in value...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Heck get both, the 39A will be my next I own both a 60 and a 10/22 WW Special.
I was thinking that eventually I'd end up with both. And probably a nice bolt action, maybe even an Annie sporter. And a couple more .22s pistols. And... :D

Okay, so you guys have reminded me that I really like the 39A. Now the question is, what do I look out for? How are the triggers? I'm going to assume they're borderline awful, if the other recent-vintage Marlin levers I've fired are an indicator (3 different 1895Gs, one 336, two 1894s). Any other quirks? Firing pin life? (I had a pin shear off in my 1894 a few weeks ago. I think it was too many "Have I fired 9 or 10?" turning into *click.*)

And who makes a good peep for the 39? Just use a Williams? Try some Marble's buckhorns? Any other thoughts?

Thanks all.
 

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two comments

I've owned both.
Both are more accurate than either of my factory 10/22s with standard Ruger barrels.
Both Marlins are equally accurate as each other. When I put scopes on them and shoot them from sandbags, I probably get 2 or 3 inch groups at 100 yards. With open sights, I get 3" groups at 50 yards. Maybe that's just me, with my limited skills. But I have not found either the Model 60 or the Model 39 to be tackdrivers. I have a Remington 700 that IS a tack driver. If I put the right ammo in it ($1 per round) I can count on a 3/4" group at 100 yards.

Both the Model 60 and the Model 39 have a rather stiff trigger -- the kind you'd expect on a boy's rifle intended for plinking at tin cans and squirrel hunting.
If you want to put a scope on either gun and do some serious shooting, I'd suggest getting a trigger job.

I like the Model 39 better. It's very high quality. Good looking finish. But I can't really say that it "outperforms" the model 60 in any way.
 

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[I'd like more accuracy than my 10/22, but I don't know as I'll notice much on practical accuracy differences. I am planning on irons, 'cause I like simple and light.]

Well, I don't know how the late model 39A's are, but I get quarter (coin)-sized groups, with the issue barrel iron sights on my non-Micro-groove 1946 Model 39A @ 50 yards - no sweat, every time.

The rifle'd probably do better, if I got my eyes traded in, 'cause (with my 65 YO vision) the rear sight sorta blends in with the barrel bluing - making the sight notch a guess & by gosh affair.

Besides, you already have an auto-plinker.
 

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have you thought about a bolt gun?
a 925 with the right equipment will out-shoot both
with same goodies, consistantly.
i have packaged around 12 925's in the last 2 months
for upcoming hunting season and there owners.
zero set-up included. even the right ammo.

no matter what you buy, you need to buy it while its still a true marlin.

and thats my onion peel!!!!!!!!!!:D

sea-ya
gendoc
 

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Model 39 definetly...

To me a model 60 (I have two of them) is a good shooting 22 that can be used for anything you want a rimfire to do (punching holes in paper, plinking, hunting).

A Model 39 is an heirloom gun (I have four, one for each of my children). You buy this one to enjoy and to pass down to your children.

Mine are just as accurate as the tricked out 10/22's that two of my sons have.

My 39 is now equipped with a Nikon scope (which does ruin the lines of the gun IMHO) due to my old eyes, but proves that it will shoot just as well as their tricked out Rugers and looks better doing it!

If you can afford a 39 get one. Try looking for an older used model. The used 39's are usually in better shape than used semi-autos. The older pre-warning and pre-safety guns just look better.

dusty
 

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To me a model 60 (I have two of them) is a good shooting 22 that can be used for anything you want a rimfire to do (punching holes in paper, plinking, hunting).

A Model 39 is an heirloom gun (I have four, one for each of my children). You buy this one to enjoy and to pass down to your children.

Mine are just as accurate as the tricked out 10/22's that two of my sons have.

My 39 is now equipped with a Nikon scope (which does ruin the lines of the gun IMHO) due to my old eyes, but proves that it will shoot just as well as their tricked out Rugers and looks better doing it!

If you can afford a 39 get one. Try looking for an older used model. The used 39's are usually in better shape than used semi-autos. The older pre-warning and pre-safety guns just look better.

dusty
That is a good point. I bought my last 39A used and it is an early 1960s gun. It has a period correct scope and is a "classic" 22 lever action. Buying used is a good option, you just need to be patient. Try to find one built before 1988.
 

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"Man thats a nobrainer the 39 hands down"
Ditto that, if you've got the money. There's no comparison. I've had my Marlin 39D since 1971, and it's still perfect. I bought it new in '71 for $68.50, and now they're in the ~$500 range.

39's aren't "disposable" rifles, they're heirlooms.
 

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Buy both the 39A and the 60.

Then take the 10/22 and put on a Green Mountain 18" or 20" heavy barrel. Put it in a Hogue stock and put on a descent scope. You will have serious accuracy.

The 60 can be a nice plinker. Put a reasonable scope on it.

The 39A is the heirloom classic. Keep it iron sighted. My '63 39A has a Redfield aperture sight. I put Williams Foolproof rear sight on my 39M. I don't like scopes on my 39A or 39M.
 
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