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OK, I have burned about 4 bricks through my Neos, and am thinking about taking a shot at the trigger job that 38super wrote up.

Those of you that have done it, or are smiths, what do you think? I grew up in the home of a smith, but have limited experience myself. I am very mechanical, and have lots of tools. The biggest thing is I don’t want to mess it up. I could take it to a real gunsmith, but don’t want to give it up for that time, and have no clue what it would cost to do.

What do you think, is it safe
:confused:
 

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DIY Trigger Job

I think so tacotrd,

Ask sikanimator, n3480h, decoycarver or awp101, they've all done the dirty deed. Read the instructions, dry run the disassembly and polishing. You're polishing faces, keep'em flat without rounding. Sorta like laying a knife blade flat to a sharpening stone.

I did all the polishing with a very smooth ceramic white stone, small plate of glass and crocus cloth (or 1200 grit paper). If you're not sure about rounding the sear edge, don't. I do this because I like the feel it gives the trigger pull, but it's not a gotta have.

If you still feel uncomfortable, support your local gunsmith. Print the trigger job postings and let him see them. Some old timers may cringe, but it worked for me and other NEOS owners are happy.

HTH
 

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Re: DIY Trigger Job

38super said:
Ask sikanimator, n3480h, decoycarver or awp101, they've all done the dirty deed.
Don't drag me into your sordid little gunsmithing world!;)

Actually I haven't even had the stones to OPEN that thread yet...I'm getting there though....:D

I'm afraid that if I find I can actually do it myself, no pistol around here will be safe.......:D
 

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OH hell ya!

AWP your're a hoot.

Tacotrd, the job does not require extreme skill, but common sense does go a long way. As 38super said, keep things flat when polishing. I did put the .010" (or smaller) radius on the edge of the sear because I shake enough as it is when trying to aim and pull triggers smoothly. That very slight radius will smooth the "break" and lessen any resulting jump when it goes. If you like triggers that "break" like glass, don't do the radius. I do like this on my rifles, but not on the handguns.

I used a flat stone (hone), and some 600 grit cloth - and a dial caliper to measure progress. I also narrowed the blade of a heavy screwdriver to get a recalcitrant screw out of the inside rear of the action so I coud get at the spring. It took me about an hour, but I could do another in 10 minutes. Tip: Disassemble your Neos with it laying on its right side so you can capture the little winged spring that resides under the bolt release lever on the left side. That sucker is carpet colored and loves to fly.

Take your time, and if you're not sure if you've gone far enough, reassemble and try it out. If you go too far, you may have a very hungry Neos that will go full auto and spit 10 rounds in about 1.5 seconds. Common sense - "moderation in all things".

One last point in this tome. Whenever you work on a trigger or have anyone else work on a trigger, test it for safety. I put an empty round in the chamber, the try the safety to insure it still works properly. Slap the gun while pulling against the safety, thump it and shake it. Whack it across the rear of the action and on the muzzle. If the safety holds, then you can put it on "fire" (again, with an EMPTY round in the chamber) to check the trigger work.

Have fun and post your results!

Ok, I'm done now, lol.
 

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Tacotrd:

Only suggestion I have is to follow 38Super's instructions TO THE LETTER! He's very good at making it simple and kind enough to share his learning with the rest of us.

Good luck and if you get stuck, post the question and you'll get the help you need.

My pistol works just fine - and with only a little swearing during the process!!!!!

Good Luck!
 

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I just did the trigger job today. The only PITA was having to grind down a thick-bladed screwdriver so that I could get that **** screw out. Red Loctite!?!

Once I got that **** screw out, it was all a piece of cake. I'll be going to the range this weekend (at the latest) to give it a try. I've got a couple of springs (including the famous bic lighter flint spring which is installed now).

I did the safety check and everything checks out.

A friend at work who does his own smithing suggested only putting 2 or 3 rounds in the mag for the first 10 or 20 rounds - so that if it does go auto, it's won't be 10 rounds all at once. And then I'll try the weaker spring - this thing is just so **** easy to work on. It is fantastic.

Thank you, gentlemen. I appreciate the help.
 

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Yeah, going to the range tomorrow and on the way back I think I'll stop and get the stuff I need.

Jeweler's rouge. Where to find?

Also "ceramic" stone? When I go to a place that sells machine tools will they know what I need or do I need to tell them something specific?

EDIT: Is this a stone like I'd use to sharpen a knife? Like an Arkansas or whetstone?:confused:
 

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Knife shop, cutlery, hardware store - let your fingers to the walking. Brownells has a good selection, also Travers, MSC or ENCO (machine tooling catalogues) are good sources.

Have your tools on hand before tearing into the trigger job.
 
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