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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
What bluing/method did you use? That bluing looks incredible as well.
I use Mark Lee's Express Rust Blue #1. It's the same process (and probably the same product) used by Doug Turnbull Restorations. I have a homemade temperature controlled cellular core PVC stand pipe that I've modified and used for many years now. I use mine to both preheat a barreled action and blacken them after the solution is wiped on with a dampened cotton ball. When you hang a barrel in boiling water for more than a few seconds there is enough latent heat stored in it to cause it to immediately flash dry when you take it out. It stays that way for several minutes and there's no need to use a gas torch. I use tongs or tweezers to hold screws and small parts in front of a heat gun until they are 150-200 degrees Fahrenheit and then apply solution. I boil them in a cheap Mainstays pot from Walmart.

There are pictures of my equipment and the products that I like to use along with links to some instructional videos showing various ways to do it in a thread about an old shotgun I refurbished for a friend:
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Very nice work!!!
I was given a gill gun many years ago, is in about the same condition as the one you restored! My goal was not to restore but to clean it up to shoot! Having other more modern 22's, I was fascinated by the slower cycle time of the gill gun! Spent the afternoon shooting!!
I'm sort of the opposite of a gun collector. I've always bought old beat up guns with the intention of shooting them. Ever since they introduced interchangeable replacement parts back in the era of muskets, there's nothing you can do to completely ruin one.

I take a "belt and suspenders" approach to maintaining guns. I view the bluing and finish as the first line of defense against the elements and only use gun oil and wax as a backup. If they get dinged and dented I don't loose any sleep over it. I just fix them up again and keep on shooting!
 

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Cleaned up and ready to reinstall, reblue, or reanodize.


After a soak in Evaporust, I mask off the roll stamps to draw file and shoe shine polish the barrel with 220 grit Emory cloth.


For rust bluing, 220 grit is usually okay. I never use anything finer than 320.


In progress shot during refitting the barrel and action. I usually strip and boil the wood to pop out any dents, kill the mildew, and help eliminate any soaked-in lubricants. I use a Jack Fisher inletting scraper to correct any swelling or warping of the barrel channel afterward before putting on the final stock finish top coats.


I borrowed a Stevens butt plate for these photos. I'm still waiting on a new one to arrive from N.C. Ordnance that I can grind to fit on this one.

I decided to put a matte finish on it










So far my free gill gun has only cost me $24 for a reproduction butt plate. One of my grandsons tried it out and reports that it shoots and cycles just fine and that he wants to keep it.
What a difference, like night and day!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
... some people shouldn't own nice things. I love that red colour on the stock.
LOL! Apparently my grandson agrees and has stepped up to look after it properly on my behalf. ;) If you like that red look, getting it is almost as easy as falling off a log. It's just 1 hour Rustoleum Cabernet. I liked the results too, and I'm not always easy to please.
 
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