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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Remington bolt action rifle. It is marked 513 on the barrel. I have determined it is probably a "S" sporter. It doesn't have the target stock or sights. The stock is checkered walnut, barrel is medium weight, and the rear sight is a ramp. Date code puts it Jan. 1947. My main question is that it is stamped "Scoremaster" not "Targetmaster". Is this correct for the Sporter model? The rifle belonged to a gun shop owner who is retiring and he believes the weapon to be all original. It is in, conservatively, 98% condition. No marks on the stock, no wear on the bluing, no buggered screws and not D&T'd. Absolutely one of the best looking older rimfires I've ever seen. Thanks everyone in advance for any help you might offer.
 

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My 513SA barrel was made in Jan 49 and marked "Matchmaster".

Sounds like a great find. Please post pics asap. A clean 513 sporter in the condition you describe is worth $800-$1000.
 

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510 is TargetMaster, 511 is ScoreMaster, 512 is SportMaster and 513S and T are MatchMaster.
The rear sight could be the standard 2 screw mounted sight like the 510,11,12, or an optional Marbles "Flat Top" sight. The front would be a Marbles "Partridge type" ramp sight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This rifle is definitely marked "513" and "Scoremaster". I knew Scoremaster should be a 511 but this one is not. That's why I posted the original question.
I'll post pics this evening and maybe that'll shed some light.
 

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This rifle is definitely marked "513" and "Scoremaster". I knew Scoremaster should be a 511 but this one is not. That's why I posted the original question.
I'll post pics this evening and maybe that'll shed some light.
Maybe the employee that applied the roll stamp was hung over on a Monday morning. Interesting!
 

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Well, I can tell you one thing for sure, it's not a 513-S. The bolt is from a 510/11/12, not a 513, the butplate is bakelite and not steel, and the forearm checkering is too high on the stock. It looks like someone restamped the 513.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I had already come to the conclusion that it wasn't a 513 but I guess my next question would be "Why". The older fellow I bought it from had owned it for twenty years or so and it was like this when he bought it. I wouldn't think these rifles would have been collectable enough to try to counterfeit one. As far as what I paid for it - I gave $450.00 and that wasn't based on it being a 513 but rather because it was a great looking rifle and I guess the best way to put it is "It spoke to me." I didn't buy it with the intent to resell. I thought (and still think) it will be a great addition to my .22's. Thanks for everyone's help.
 

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I would say it's a 511. Along with all the other things mentioned, the 513 Sporter had better wood, and was stamped 513-S, the "513-S" being the same size as the word "Model."

As to Why, in 1951 the Model 511 listed for $27.65 and the 513S for $57.05. 20 years ago would be about 1988. The 513-S already had a reputation for fine accuracy, and gould get a premium price then. Yours looks like it has been refinished and checkered. For a good looking shooting rifle, it fits the bill. Considering a 513-S is about 10 times the price listed in 1951, your 511 cost about 10 times its listed 1951 price.

If you check the prices on mass produced, plastic stocked .22s, the $250 price range for the upscale ones is about normal. I,m not talking about Coopers or the top-of-the line models, but the middle, good shooting ones.

If you are happy with it, then what the heck.
 
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