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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
- First Post...(this is a great forum!)

This forum (as you know) is going to hurt me and all my money. My dad told me about this site and now I need a .22 and a lot of money for mods. ;)

Alright, well I'm 15 and I'm not a big gun enthusiast. My father and I go down to the range every other weekend now. I'm a pianist (as you can tell by my user name) but my father has gotten me into guns now. I've got a small amount money, but I feel I'm going to be going down the 'do it yourself' road (which will of course cost me a larger chunk of mulah). I'm trying to build an all-round rifle.

I guess it's blueprinting time though, I'm trying to only have one 10/22 and slowly build it up over time (which could be a few months before the first parts), but in the end have something I'll like for a long long time. Of all I've read so far, the only thing I'm pretty sure of as being must haves or the bests are...(say anything to contradict)

(Not including anything such as shipping or tax)
Brand New 10/22 Carbine - $159.99
Kid Two-Stage Match Trigger (Standard Curved) - $279.99 (Expensive!!)
Ten22 ShockStop Bolt Buffer - $5.95
Ruger 40th Anniversary Clear Factory Rotary Magazine - $16.95

Optic Options: (?)
I'm pretty sure I'm putting a scope on it. Would a Weaver or VCL scope mount work great? On to the scope, the Nikon Prostaff 3-9X40 is a pretty good scope for a 'bang for the buck' sort of thing (which has gotten me pretty interested). My dad got one and I have to admit it's pretty nice. But, is Leupold better? When I mean better, I mean worth the extra money to the point of being a lot better.

Barrel Options: (?)
Not sure about this yet, not going down the suppressor path. I know WhistlePig has got some pretty nice looking fluted barrels. Volkquartsen has some nice (but more expensive) barrels too though.

Stock Options: (?)
My fav. gun (being 15 of course) is the Ar-15, but the Evolution stock is pretty cheesy on a .22 in my opinion. They could have done better. The Dragunov is a pretty nice looking stock though, how is it on a .22? I've noticed a few people have said it doesn't fit snug of a 10/22. I'm looking for a synthetic stock (def.), but I'm not sure if it has to be tactical looking.

Reciever Options: (?)
Do I need one?

Anything Else: (?)
:confused:

Really I'm looking for suggestions for an all-around gun. I'm also sure being new to this I'm missing some critical mods or components that could be very useful. Sooner or later (hopefully) a couple of these nice mods could go on a slight sale.

Keep in mind that even though I said all that (about getting expensive mods), budget is the biggest factor in me building this gun... :( Saying that, what's some good mods and what not that cost nearly nothing?

Thanks in advance for any help. Much appreciated!!

:AR15firin
 

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:Welcome: to RFC. I will try to help out the best i can. first if you are building on a budget as most are try the TTSHOOTER trigger rebuild on your stock trigger. at only $80.00 a much better deal than the KIDD with your choice of pull wieghts. the extra $ you save can be used for other mods. most of the guys here use a laminate stock or if they run a sythetic its usually a hogue overmolded or some sort of folder.(please correct me if i'm wrong guys) you dont need a reciever. the nikon is a good scope and will serve you well, but is the leupold better? the answer is yes but the choice is yours on how much better quality VS $. look at both and buy the one that suits you. either is an excellent choice. try Millett scope rings on a weaver style mount for your scope. as far as barrels go let your budget be your guide shop around and look here for good deals and on ebay if you can. the last barrel i bought off ebay i got for $120.00 it is a clark fluted SS worth about $300.00 good deal. just be carefull what you bid on. you can also get very good barrels off the sponser page Green Mountain makes a very good barrel for the $$$. the clear magazines are not as good as the black ones. good luck and keep :snipersmi
 

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all around ultimate

Welcome to RFC. I would save the money on the Kid trigger and send your bolt to CMP and send your trigger to TT Shooter. That way you get your bolt reworked and a good trigger for less than the cost of the Kid. A fluted Green Mountain barrel and a Boyd's thumb hole sporter stock would be my sugestion for an all around ultimate. I would suggest an AO scope in the 4-16 power range. Good luck.
 

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Welcome,

A few thoughts on your build:

1) Barrel: If you are thinking of a light weight barrel (as noted by your comments on WP and VQ), I would look at Tactical Solutions. They make a very nice light weight barrel. I think it is the best kept secret in the 10/22 barrel industry.

2) Stock: If you are sold on synthetic stocks: McMillan Stocks . These are the best in the synthetic stock arena. Personally, I'm not a big synthetic fan. My favorite stock is Claude Gatewood . These stocks are works of art. They fit you like a glove.

Regarding you're idea of putting the Dragnov stock onto an action with a Kidd trigger: that is similar to putting 4 retread spare tires on your Ferrari. Honestly, I think the Kidd is "too much" trigger for a first time build. For $20 you could buy one of the bargain bin VQ target triggers. This is a 5 minute install and will give you a very nice 2.5# pull.

3) Optics. I think your choice of the Nikon Prostaff is a good one. For the casual shooter, this scope is more than enough. I own two of them.

4) Add a VQ exact edge extractor to you list of internal parts.

Just my 2 cents...
 

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Piano Man said:
- First Post...(this is a great forum!)

Stock Options: (?)
My fav. gun (being 15 of course) is the Ar-15, but the Evolution stock is pretty cheesy on a .22 in my opinion. They could have done better.
:AR15firin
Oh really :cool: :



I haven't gotten any cheesy comments on that Evolution build.
 

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Piano Man said:
I'm trying to only have one 10/22 and slowly build it up over time (which could be a few months before the first parts), but in the end have something I'll like for a long long time.
Until you fess up and post an actual budget amount, what can we suggest :confused: Okay, here's the easy suggestion:

-Kidd trigger. Forget the 'budget' trigger jobs, you want an ultimate, then this is the only one to consider. At least until 'someone' offers a 6 oz. two stage trigger for under $200 LOL.
-Have CPC work the bolt, thread the receiver, and fit a barrel.
-Whichever stock feels most comfortable to you. I like Anschutz, that shouldn't mean squat to you though, pick the one YOU like.
-Optics. Guess this sort of depends on whether you go the bling route and try an AR look alike or do a more traditional build.

You'll end up sinking $1,000 plus into a gun that probably won't shoot better than a $300 bolt action and may not shoot better than a 10/22 that uses less expensive parts, but it sure would an ultimate.
 

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say forego the KIDD trigger for now just get some parts for the stock one. also, i'd get a B.C. 25rnd steel lips mag (instead of the clear). optics sounds fine. get the WeaponKraft bolt buffer(see RFC main page). maybe a new extractor, there are lots of fine barrel stock combos available but I'd stay away from that cheap one you refered to. if i can come up with $300 i may be getting a new stock and barrel combo from Boyds.

Personal preference aside:
the best route to go if you arent just independently wealthy-

buy the gun (and the scope if you have the $) you can shoot it off the shelf for a bit
when you get soem more $ get the scope if you didnt already and a bolt buffer
next maybe a hi-cap magazine (soooo much fun) and a new hammer
now maybe some bolt work
then save up for a new stock and barrel

if you do it like this the gun is operational the whole time whereas if you buy the gun and a stock but cant afford the .920 barrel then you cant shoot the gun till you pony up some more cash.
good luck whatever you do decide. happy shooting.
 

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I'm leaning towards agreeing with Homersapien. This all depends on what you want to do with your rifle first off (goals); secondly, the amount you're willing to spend to achieve it (budget); and the amount of time you're willing to invest to get it to operate at it's peak, and/or stay there (maintenance).

Judging by your list of parts, it would seem that you really don't have a goal in mind. Since you picked the KID trigger, you're in the mood for "nothing but the best", yet you chose a Druganov stock, which indicates "form over function".

Goals: Do you want a tactical rifle, a benchrest shooter, a sillhouette/offhand rifle, or a varmint gun? Pick one style, not two, as these typically don't interchange with stock, barrel, internal parts, and optic choices. In the example of the KID trigger, that's too much for a tactical rifle, but just right for a BR gun. Your goals will determine the direction you need to go, and the parts to accomodate it.

Budget: This will determine which parts you can truly afford to use, and may even have a bearing on your goals as well. Only $500? Then I would steer away from the KID triggered, Lilja barreled rifle, and lean towards something a little more affordable.

As well, with a first rifle, it's a little immature and uneducated to simply buy the most expensive, even if it is the "best money can buy". If I may make any recommendations in this whole rant, it's to keep your budget around $400-500 for a first rifle, keeping your thoughts with the best bang for the buck-type of additions and modifications.

For example: Getting a VQ hammer versus a full trigger group will not only save you about $280 to use on other parts, but it'll still get you a much lighter trigger pull - one that a novice shooter will never notice is any better or worse than the full trigger group. Odds are, you can use a $90 Green Mountain barrel that'll shoot better than you can, than to spend nearly $400 on a VQ.

Maintenance: While having a high-profile, good shooting and good looking rifle is all of our goals, one can't be negligent in remembering that it's no longer a stock rifle. The stock rifle eats any ammo, all the time, and can go LOOOOONNG periods without cleaning. Due to the tighter tolerances and "better" nature of the parts, they're less forgiving of any uncleanliness or alignment; requiring a higher degree of attention on your part to ensure that all the parts are working well together - it isn't just a "bolt on" toy like Gran Turismo. Additionally, the barrels are designed for only one purpose: accuracy, and as such, demand more attention to ammunition choices (unfortunately, it's usually more expensive) and cleanliness.

I wish you the best of luck PianoMan. No one person on this board can literally tell you what to do, nor can they even sway your mind in any one direction. It is entirely up to you which rifle you want to build, and how much money and time you're willing to put into it. If I can lend any advise from an experienced mistake-maker, it's that the smart man learns from his mistakes, the wise man learns from the mistakes of others, and the fool repeats them. Maybe you won't have the world's best rifle from the get-go, but trust me on this: it won't be your only 10/22. You'll have plenty of opportunities to learn and grow on this rifle, and build many more to different and better specs - and if you choose wisely, you will have saved yourself many cubic dollars and headaches in the process.

Good luck!
 

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And because I'm a retard and didn't actually offer any advise to a rifle build... Here's my thoughts, in order, of how to best blow some money on a 10/22:

1a - Cheapest Route: Buy a stock carbine and shoot it until the barrel melts into a disgusting arc, rebarrel, repeat. There is simply no rifle more reliable and fun than a Ruger 10/22, which is why we're all here to begin with. This gun will last you literally FOREVER. Just keep investing ammo into your purchase.

1b - Step it up: You can then stick some certain things into your gun that only make the stock rifle that much more fun and easy to use. I'd get a quick mag release (my favorite is the VQ release) and a bolt buffer. If the trigger is too stiff for you, wait for Volquartsen to have hammers in their bargain bin for $20.

2 - Optics: I'd look into scopes in the 32mm to 40mm range, roughly a 4 or 3-9 power, for a stock-barrelled rifle, lest you expose the weaknesses of the original barrel. The original Ruger scope mount is just fine for sub $50 scopes, but if you put anything of any quality on top, you'll want PowerCustom or Volquartsen's receiver-mounted weaver scope mount, or VQ's new Picatinny rail. Scopes of decent quality in this price range: Simmons, Tasco, Bushnell. You can look into Leapers and BSA, but I rarely hear anything good about them.

3 - Barrels and Stocks By now, you've shot enough to expose the weaknesses of the original barrel, and found your comfort leve with the stock is dwindling - time to step it up. Look for a stock design YOU will be comfortable with, and a maker that has the best price, colors, shape, and any other factor you're considering. The sponsor section has enough of those to make your head spin.

Barrels are another matter. The lightweight barrel makers (WhistlePig and Tactical Solutions, Magnum Research, Volquartsen THM) make incredibly accurate products, so it's hard to say that you're compromising weight for accuracy - however, it is generally agreed that heavier barrels have a different purpose than lightweight barrels and are more accurate. Green Mountain barrels are said to have the most accuracy per dollar, and are generally the most affordable too. The best barrels are made by Lilja and Shilen, and everybody else falls somewhere in between; except Butler Creek and Clerke (not Clark), which is nearly unanimously agreed to be no better sometimes than a stock barrel. Your budget plays the biggest role here with the barrel - you can easily stay between $100 and $200 and get something that shoots ragged holes, but you could just as easily spend more than $300 and $400 on a barrel too. Let your goals and your budget be your guide.

4a - Bolt: With an increase in accuracy from the barrel, it would leave the bolt as the weak link in accuracy. Have the bolt reworked by Randy @ CPC - the best money ever invested. You can do the same mods he does too, but if you're not very sure of that, it's best to send it off. KID also does the same thing to Ruger bolts. Prices are about $50 to have yours done, or $75 to just buy one already done.

4b - Aftermarket bolts: I can't think of any aftermarket bolts except Volquartsen and AMT, and I only have knowledge and experience with VQ's bolt. It's a totally different bolt than the Ruger bolt. It has all the same benefits as having your stock bolt modified, as well, it is a different part altogether if that matters to you.

5a - Trigger: At this point, the stock trigger will probably be showing it's weaknesses to you as well. You have options, depending on your budget. I'd recommend not buying a gaggle of unobtanium or blingbling, but rather sending your trigger off to a reputable gunsmith for their mods. Randy @ CPC, Todd @ TT Shooter, Skeeter27Red all come to mind. Many shooters on this board have had their work done, and actually say that it's plenty good for them, and they have no need for more. Prices are under $100.

5b - Aftermarket Triggers: Here's where some good money can get spent. There are quite a few trigger groups for sale, but the argument usually comes down to VQ and KID, with KID leading the way by leaps and bounds. If having your stock trigger isn't enough for your purposes, or having the absolute best is the only way to satisfy your ego, these are the two to look into. Prices for a VQ are under $200, while a KID nearly reaches $300.

6 - Scopes, pt. 2: By now, your gun would be shooting way past the limitations of the cheaper $50 scope - look into whatever your heart desires. Don't spend less than $100 on a bargain scope - get a REAL target scope: high magnification, big objective lens, sunshades... the whole bit. Spend about $200 to $600, because it's the only way you're going to literally SEE the accuracy or lack thereof.

7 - Anything beyond: If these rifle setups still aren't enough for you, and/or you've exhausted your wallet to the point of actually following this list step-by-step, then a 10/22 just isn't enough for you. And, by God, anything stock just won't do!! Get a new aluminum receiver by Force or a Volquartsen Superlight - the quality of the materials and the precision at which they're made makes the Ruger look like it was made by a caveman! If that still isn't enough, get a Stainless receiver by MOA or Volquartsen... after all, money isn't an object at this point. And what good is a $400 barrel on a cheapie Ruger action anyway, right? :D

There are also little tricks that guys are using to drag even MORE accuracy out of their rifles, once they've found the limits of their current setup. Things such as: bughole tuners, bedding, rifling rates, barrel length, port timing, and bolt weight/speed. Not only is it a bolt-on dream, but the 10/22 also benefits from a lot of attention to detail. And if you've gone this far, you'd better be ready for it!

All kidding aside, I hope this list helps. I don't mean to rib you, but I hope it made it more clear - regarding your parts list - where certain parts/accessories fall in with respect to the level you and your gun are. Good luck with your build. Stay smart and keep :AR15firin
 

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If anybody were to write a book entitled The How-To Book of Modifying the Ruger 10/22 these two posts by MinusB would be the perfect Introduction. He has done an outstanding job of putting the subject into perspective.

This should be required reading for every novice before being allowed to post the myriad of How Do I ...or Where Do I Start... questions on the various RFC forums.
 

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I would recommend getting the WallyWorld special rifle for around $215 It comes with a niceer full length stock, and a Stainless Steel 22" barrel. You should also be prepaired to buy a good scope at this time. I highly recommend the Simmons ATV 4.5-14x40. It's a GREAT little scope for under $100

Shoot a couple of bricks of high velocity ammo through it, to get it broke in well.
Make sure for the first 100 shots you shoot 10 and clean, shoot 10 and clean ect ect until you've shot 100 rounds. Then field strip the rifle and give it a thourgh cleaning and a light coat of remmington dry lube.

By this time hopefully you've saved up some money. Send your barreled action to Randy at CPC (he's in our sponcers list) Ask for the complete tune up. For about $170 Randy will rework the bolt, do a great trigger job, true up the action and set the barrel back and recrown (this suppose to make the barrel shoot on par with the other "match" barrels. You get all of this and he'll even through in a bolt buffer IF you ask for it.

Now you can decide on a stock, and since you sprung for the delux model you can make a few bucks off of selling your original stock. Or you may decide to just keep the original stock. They are rather nice (DSP models)

Then if you till want a barrel, (you probably wont 'need one) get whatever you want. 16" are best and lightest. I always recommend SS and flutes also. (personal preference)

You're all set.
good luck and welcome to RFC

swampf0x



Now you have an affordable ultimate
 

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SwampFOX, I respect that you're one of the best educated on this website about Ruger 10/22's, so as I say this, remember that I'm more-or-less, saying it as a question.

Why would you get a Wally World special, or a Ruger Target Model, if you plan on changing everything out anyway? The value doesn't seem to be there, unless you plan on leaving the rifle stock. The only part that seems to stay "stock" on any of our guns is the receiver and the magazine - so why start with "peripherals" that cost more?

For $20-30 extra, you get a laminated stock, and a barrel that you recommend putting another $100 into. Why not just buy a GM for that $100? Okay, so $20-30 to get a better stock... except that you recommend to sell it off for a $100 (minimum) stock. Where's the value?

The only value I see in those rifles is for a) someone who needs something more accurate than a carbine BOX STOCK and will leave it BOX STOCK, or b) a collector.

I don't get it. That's why I say to start with as cheap a carbine as you can find, or go whole-hog with an aftermarket receiver.
 

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That is a good question that has been bounced around here a lot. I think the consensus is that if you know you are going to only use the receiver and maybe the trigger group, you can recoup more of your initial expense by selling off the 22" stainless barrel and deluxe checkered stock from the WM special. Ebay is your friend in this case. The barrels have been known to bring $60-80 regularly, and the stock can usually be sold for $40-55. This brings the expense down in comparison to what the standard carbine parts bring. (about $35 total)

It all boild down to how you want to approach it. I say that most people end up with more than one of these 10/22's anyway, so buy whatever suits you. Personally, I have done the WM special part it out game, and ended up with a silver receiver and trigger group and a bunch of black and blued parts that need homes.. Probably will be going out to get a standard carbine just for the factory black paint.. Crazy? Yep. Welcome to RFC.
 

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Piano man,

If I where going to build a budget Ultimate I would use the following components;

Gm 20” bull barrel
Houge over molded stock
Weaponcraft bolt buffer
Burris signature zee rings
Best quality scope budget will bare
Power custom scope base
Send trigger to TT shooter

This will give you a very completive all around rifle. Any thing more is just points for style and maybe an 1/8th of an inch smaller group @ 50 yards. One thing to think about is that at your age this will not be your last rifle, just the first of many. So don’t worry about having the absolute best of every mod, that will come with time. The next thing I’ am going to suggest will maybe get some fired up(not my intension I love 10/22s) but at your age a bolt gun like a cz varmiter would help develop your skills a lot more than any semi auto ever will. I no this is a 10/22 forum and teenagers love semi autos but a bolt gun will teach you more about marksmanship and be more accurate for less money.

Enjoy shooting Piano man;
Ruger Rob
 
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