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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Wanted to add a disclaimer.

Note: First, any work performed on your rifle is at your own risk, I'm posting this as a guide to what has worked on mine. Your results may vary depending on the condition of other parts (hammer, springs etc.). Any work performed on your rifle will of course void the warranty as well. You should also be aware that any modifications to the sear and/or hammer can result in an unsafe condition.

I decided to put all the pictures and instructions of my trigger work in one place.

Using a crude, weights & hook style pull gauge, the trigger pull on my 60 was over 7-lbs even after a few thousand rounds fired, it also had pre-travel, a little sear creep and some over-travel. Not the worst trigger ever but after shooting my other rifles and handguns with triggers 4-lbs or less it was time for a change.

I tried adjusting/bending the springs, (sear, trigger & disconnector) and the results were okay but the rifle was unreliable, especially after 100-150 rounds. So I replaced all the springs and looked towards the sear and hammer.

Before you get started, I suggest buying a new sear if you decide to try this method, you can use it as a guide to gauge your work and it will be good insurance if you damage the original sear. Same thing goes for the hammer if you make any changes to it other than just polishing.

In photo #1 you'll see a toolmaker's vise with a Marlin 60/795 sear clamped in and the ultra-fine triangle shaped stone on the sear surface using the left edge of the vise as a guide. I put a piece of clear packing tape on the vise where the stone is riding to keep the stone from grinding on the vice. This stone can be used to polish the hammer hook on the hammer.

When clamping the sear, you want to keep the factory sear angle flat, level and parallel with the top surface of the vise. The end result we be a new sear angle that mates to the hammer cleanly.

The height of the sear in the vise will change the angle of your work, as you raise the sear in the vise (yellow arrow) your trigger will get lighter because you're reducing the angle of hammer engagement. Be careful, if you raise the sear too high the hammer hooks will not hold. The rifle may become full-auto if the hammer fails to lock.

#1


Photo #2 shows me taking a height measurement of .305" with the depth gauge on a set of Brown & Sharpe 6" dial calipers. The calipers you see in the background are some 4" china knock-offs, they work if I keep them adjusted, but the Brown & Sharpe are much nicer.

#2


Photo #3 shows the direction (red arrow) I used to cut the sear, the only reason I chose this direction was because of the narrow stone. It was all I had in fine or ultra fine. If you have a stone wider than the sear surface you can cut in the direction of the yellow arrows.

#3


Photo #4-A is a crude drawing of what the sear looked like before (left) and after (center). You do not have to cut a new angle on the entire sear surface area, the hammer hook is not deep enough to use the whole surface. Cutting just half was more than enough on my rifle. Photo's 4-B through 4-D are updated pics of a freshly worked sear.

The far right image shows where the face of the sear was reduced with the same stone. This is only recommended if you have excessive sear creep, Marlin uses less than a third of the sear surface (photos #5 yellow arrow, & #6) to start with and if you remove too much the sear is worthless. All I removed was about .005" from this area.

#4-A


#4-B


#4-C


#4-D


In pictures #5 and 6 you can see the sear and hammer are fully engaged, it looks like only about 25% of the sear surface is catching the hammer hook.

#5


#6


Image #7 is another crude drawing, this is the hammer profile.

There wasn't much to do with the hammer, polishing the sear engagement surface was about it. You can reduce sear creep by stoning the nose if it's needed, but work slowly, about .002-.003" then test fire. If you remove too much the hammer will not lock.

Do not remove any metal from the area below the hammer hook, if you do this will increase the amount of sear creep.

#7


The picture below shows the results of the trigger pull gauge after the work was finished. It took four sessions with the stone and test firing at the range to achieve the sub 3-lb trigger pull.

Using the tools above your first attempt should give you a trigger pull just over 4-lbs, that's what mine was. I just raised the sear a bit, worked it again, then test fired until I got the 2-lb 10-oz trigger pull seen below. Just work slowly and test fire the rifle each time you change the sear.

Unfortunately I didn't have the trigger pull gauge before the sear work, so I don't have a before trigger pull image. I'll order a new sear and hammer soon to install and get a factory, unmodified reading posted later.



Currently my Model 60 has a DIP target trigger, the new angle on the sear, the hammer and sear matting surfaces are polished with 1200 grit sand paper and I shaved about .005" off the face of the sear. (see pic #4 far right, red image) The springs are less than 6 months old, most are factory replacements with the exception of the J&P hammer and recoil spring kit.

The result is a trigger that's smooth, breaks clean just under 2-lbs 10-oz and has zero pre-travel thanks to the set screw in the DIP trigger. The over-travel was never much of an issue with me, but if you would like to reduce yours the DIP trigger guards are drilled and tapped for a trigger stop screw or you can drill and tap you factory trigger guard.

Tool list used for the sear work detailed above, plus the tools needed to break down the action:

Norton ultra-fine triangle shaped stone (any fine or ultra-fine stone will work)
Set of dial caliper, 4" or 6" is fine
Lyman trigger pull gauge, 0-12-lbs part #7832248
One 2" tool makers vise, can be purchased from e-Bay or Shars. (china knock-off, but works)





 

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I am really glad that this subject is still "hot" as I am getting ready to perform this task myself very soon. I recieved some new springs yesterday from Brownell's (two days!)and a DIP drop-in trigger on Tuesday(ordered on Saturday. WOW!) and the J&P spring kit is on the way as I write this. I grabbed a vise off of e-bay a couple weeks ago and all I need now is the stone which I think I can borrow. I really appreciate what Eric0424 has done for all of us; not just for the sake of the present project but for encouraging some of us to get deeper into gunsmithing in general by his example. He is obviously a Hot-rodder at heart. Anyway, I do have a question regarding that little set-screw on the DIP trigger. Does this screw need to be "locked" with a drop of Lock-Tite? Their screw is very short and with so few threads engaged in that soft aluminum, I wonder if it will get sloppy or loosen after some use. I think I would prefer a longer screw so that all the threads are engaged. any thoughts on that, anyone? I dunno, maybe it's time to invest in an allen screw assortment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, I think knowledge like this should be shared with anyone willing to do the work on their own rifles and handguns.

I am really glad that this subject is still "hot" as I am getting ready to perform this task myself very soon. I recieved some new springs yesterday from Brownell's (two days!)and a DIP drop-in trigger on Tuesday(ordered on Saturday. WOW!) and the J&P spring kit is on the way as I write this. I grabbed a vise off of e-bay a couple weeks ago and all I need now is the stone which I think I can borrow. I really appreciate what Eric0424 has done for all of us; not just for the sake of the present project but for encouraging some of us to get deeper into gunsmithing in general by his example. He is obviously a Hot-rodder at heart. Anyway, I do have a question regarding that little set-screw on the DIP trigger. Does this screw need to be "locked" with a drop of Lock-Tite? Their screw is very short and with so few threads engaged in that soft aluminum, I wonder if it will get sloppy or loosen after some use. I think I would prefer a longer screw so that all the threads are engaged. any thoughts on that, anyone? I dunno, maybe it's time to invest in an allen screw assortment.
I would recommend a drop of lock-tite on the set screw, and if you prefer one a little longer they are 6-32 thread and can be purchased at Home Depot, Tractor Supply etc. or on-line at Fastenal and Enco.
 

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Yeah, I think I will get a longer one and maybe put a little something on the threads too. It just makes sense to me to use all of the thread since there is so little to begin with. I believe in over-building things mechanical since I've spent much of my life fixing stuff that's broken. I tried to communicate my thoughts on this screw thing to DIP via their e-mail system and my messages got rejected. I don't know why that happened but you just saved me a phone call. Thanks again.
 

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new sear needed

So... I managed to take off a bit too much on my sear... I didn't have quite the perfect equipment or tools for the mod, but tried to make it work:rolleyes:. I did take my time, and quite honestly, the trigger pull is now beautiful, but it's no longer user friendly or safe to say the least:mad: Where's the best place to get a new sear? Not much comes up on the search.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So... I managed to take off a bit too much on my sear... I didn't have quite the perfect equipment or tools for the mod, but tried to make it work:rolleyes:. I did take my time, and quite honestly, the trigger pull is now beautiful, but it's no longer user friendly or safe to say the least:mad: Where's the best place to get a new sear? Not much comes up on the search.
It happens, I've got a sear right here that was under 1# trigger pull but it won't lock the hammer back safely anymore. I just kept trimming this one until it stopped working safely, it seems 2-2-1/2 lbs is a safe place to stop on the Marlin 60/795 set-up

Numrich still has the sear in stock, Midway and Brownells seem to be on back-order for the sear. I would order two if you plan on working another one.

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/catalog/Detail.aspx?pid=444210C&catid=11759
 

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It happens, I've got a sear right here that was under 1# trigger pull but it won't lock the hammer back safely anymore. I just kept trimming this one until it stopped working safely, it seems 2-2-1/2 lbs is a safe place to stop on the Marlin 60/795 set-up

Numrich still has the sear in stock, Midway and Brownells seem to be on back-order for the sear. I would order two if you plan on working another one.

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/catalog/Detail.aspx?pid=444210C&catid=11759
Thanks for the link.
FYI for anyone thinking it would be better to order parts from marlin directly, it seems most parts (in the action) are restricted according to them, and you have to have an FFL to order them... I spent 30+ miniutes on the phone, on hold just to find this out:mad::mad::mad:!
 

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Eric,

Your tutorial was invaluable. I followed your steps outlining polishing the sear in picture #4 (middle (4b if you will)). I have a tool makers vice like yours and bought an Arkansas polishing stone like the one in your pictures for about $8. After 2 polishing sessions with a reassembly and shooting session in between the trigger is now perfect. Final result is about a 3lb pull with no creep and it holds safe. Your posting combined with ArrowDodger's PPT presentation allowed me to make this rifle better than I hoped.

:bthumb:

Thank you,
Scott

PS. I have two more tips for those of you wishing to follow these great instructions
1. Polish the top of the sear (where it engages with the hammer hook) before you begin to cut the angle.
2. Mark the top of the sear with a sharpie black marker so that as you polish the angle you can visually monitor the material that is being removed (it goes from black to shiny.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, superx1 .....and good tips too. I've started using a cheap 10X loupe/jewelers eye-piece to see what's happening with the sears & hammers, but I used my cold bluing chemicals in place of the sharpie. Both will get the job done.
 

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Kudos for Eric

Thanks Eric!! I just finished working on my new to me 7000. The action differs a bit from the 60 but it was a piece of cake.

Of course I forgot to paper clip the hammer spring, so as long as it was out I dremeled one and a half coils off of it before assembly.

Polished all the parts and put a dab of copper anti-seize on all applicable areas.

Did the sear work as you described, and slightly bent the sear spring to relieve some pressure as it rests on the magazine disconnector pin.

Did the floppy spring trigger as well as a JB weld. The JB Weld was surprising as I had to sand off almost as much as I had added. It really doesn't take much JB Weld to eliminate the creep. This required at least five steps of disassembly, assembly and test.

I just took a water in the jug, fishing line trigger pull test. I finally settled on an amount of water in the jug that would repeat a dry fire without jerking six times. To my amazement when I weighed the jug it weighed 1 pound and seven ounces!!!!!! (Checked for bump fire and it's perfect)

Can't wait for the Evolution stock and Mueller 8X25X44 that are on their way to me.
 

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$40.95 plus shipping and handling for 4 springs!? :eek:No thanks. I followed the directions in this post, kept ALL of my FULL power springs intact and have a crisp trigger pull of less than 4lbs. Functions perfectly and cost me around free-ninety-free...now if you could deliver a trigger pull of say, hmm 23 ozs, I would be interested.
20 ounces ! sheeeeesh :p
 

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Hey all, new guy here.

I read through this entire post and learned alot. I didn't see any videos about a Marlin 795 Trigger Job so I made a video series that shows what I did. I couldn't have done it without all your help.

My trigger is now at 2.5 lbs (or some might say 40 oz) and it feels smooth and crisp.

Let me know what you think. Thanks.

 
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