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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi:

I just bought a new Wally World special 10/22 (22" s/s barrel and deluxe stock, birch not walnut).

Normally, I would shoot a new gun for a while before tweaking anything on it, but there are so many reasonablly-priced goodies for this bugger that I simply started some simple mods. right out of the box!

I put in a VQ hammer, bolt buffer, extended mag. release, and I dremel-tooled the bolt release for "auto release". I also put a Williams peep sight in the rear, and the Eagle "Zephr" sight up front. In all, less than an hour's work for my first time ... I could probably do the same thing to a buddy's gun in less than 30 minutes now. (really - for any of you who are apprehensive about the above-mentioned mods., THEY ARE Oh-So EASY ... the trigger installation procedure steps found somewhere on this forum, with the photos and the "toothpick as a temporary pin" technique are very helpful)

Anyway, I still haven't shot her yet but hope to take her to the range tomorrow. OK, here comes my question!

The trigger assembly seems to slip into the receiver much too easily. There is NO friction ... in fact, there is substantial room for quite a "wobble-factor". Even with the gun fully assembled in its stock, I can wiggle the trigger guard back-n-forth a bit. To me, this seems like way too much play. Is this normal for the 10/22?

I would prefer there to be tighter tolerences. In fact, I'm almost tempted to "squeeze" the receiver in a vise a bit to close it up. I doubt this would be wise, though, so I won't let myself do it!
I have seen advertised "oversized pins". I suppose these would tighten things up. I mean, I did not have to "drift" out any of the pins with a hammer and punch - they simply pused out with minimal effort. Is this normal, too?

Any suggestions? Does one use shims, or washers, to tighten this type of slack? Is this slop "par for the course" and should I just ignore/accept it?

TIA,
Mono
 

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If you have access to drills and taps, drill the upper reciever about 1/4 inch up, center, tap it for whatever thread you desire or have, put in a set screw. It will put pressure on the trigger group housing, and hold it tight against the pins.

Atleast that's what I did, and it worked great.


Nate
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I should have ...

I should have done a "search" on this "loose fit" topic before posting. I now see that there's PLENTY of posts about it.
Thanks, Nate.

Soooooooo ... any specific suggestions for the size of the anchoring screw? I have never tapped aluminum before, and I have no idea how soft/hard the receiver is. I guess I'm concerned about thread pitch ... which is better, fine or coarse?
(I'm guessing that fine is best)

Thanks, all.
 

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my reciever was like drilling through butter. I used a center drill first, then hmmm...i forget the drill and tap size, but its a decently coarse thread. I don't tighten it too snug, in fear of stripping the reciever.

Nate
 

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Oversized Pins

I couldn't bring myself to drill an unsightly hole in the most expensive part of my gun so I ordered a set of Leckie's oversized pins from Brownells for about $10. Trigger group to receiver fit is solid as a rock with the oversized pins. ohioruger
 

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Nate is dead to nuts correct. The trigger housing set screw is hidden by the stock, when done right (It's really hard to goof up a drill n tap deal), looks kinda cool, and makes ALOT of sense in all aspects. I have tried oversize pins, and they have not taken up ALL of the slop in my 10/22's. No two are alike, and often the screw is the best way for a positive trigger group/reciever "lock-up". Oversize pins can take up the vertical and front to rear slop, however, the side to side slop can still happen. The set scew cures all of the points of movement.

Not to flame anyones opinon of oversize pins, I view them as useful as putting Slick 50 in an auto engine. :p
 

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I first tried a set of oversized pins and they really helped. Trigger pull consistency was improved.

I've recently used a set of Kidd receiver pins that are screwed in. You simply chamfer the receiver pin holes properly, put the new pins in and secure them with the supplied screws.

Very sanitary fix.

Holmes
 

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Thanks R.J.! I think I will give it a try. :D

I have made several of the Tips and Tricks modifications and installed a Volquartsen hammer. My trigger pull went from "off the scale" on my old spring type guage to 1 1/4 pounds! Although I tested for safety and could find no problem, I felt that this was just too light. I replaced the Volquartsen trigger return spring with the original spring and it went back up to 2 pounds, which is fine with me.
I do have a lot of take up in the trigger which I would like to reduce. I did the J-B Weld trick but that didn't help much.
Any suggestions or do you guys just get used to the take up?

GHP
 

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Hmm....sounds like ya did the JB Weld trick improperly. You need more meat built up to work off of to get the slack out.

Mine tokk a gob to build up, and a bit of fine filing and fitting and refiting till it was juuuuuust right. Trigger has zero slack or pretravel. I worked the hammer, put in a faced sear, did the 'ol pen spring trick, and followed up with a "mallet whack test".

Breaks real nice at 1.2 Ibs.

To really get everything to hook up the wya you want it to, you MUST understand every itty bitty part very intimately, almost more so than yer......well, she's probably reading over yer shoulder so I ain't gonna say it!

:) :t
 
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