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For decades I have heard and read about a build up of lead ahead of the chamber, the "lead ring". Until last weekend I never really experienced it to the point that I was even aware. I probably clean often enough that I don't see its affect. Before I start the bad news, please understand that my belief is that this particular occurance was strictly related to ammunition and not the very fine Green Mountain SS fluted barrel on my custom 10/22.

I was away at a cabin with family, and a brother-in-law who has led a sheltered life was getting his first extended shooting experience. My mistake was ever letting him get hold of any of my four 10/22's that were present. He went through four bricks in two days.

At one point, he experienced a total inability to hit cans at fifty yards, or any other reactive target we were using. I swapped guns with him and he eagerly went back to heating up another barrel. I thought possibly the scope mount had shifted or the scope itself had lost zero. I went to punching paper.

After a good twenty minutes of chasing the point of impact all over the paper, I noticed some irregularity to the holes. I retieved the target and saw just a bunch of ragged holes, none round.

I disassembled the gun, removed the barrel, and peering down the bore noticed significant fouling at the chamber end, along with a completely circular restriction of about 20% of bore diameter. This is enough that a standard rod and patch will not make it through, nor would a brush, let alone and entire .22 lead slug.

I won't even describe the process I went through to clear the bore, but suffice it to say that once done, my immediate goal was to benchrest it so I would be able to tell whether the barrel was even salvagable. It did live through it and still shoots exceptionally well.

Anyway, while still at the cabin, without a lot of tools, but having seen the mess, I started trying to figure out where we went wrong. It certainly was not the 300-400 rounds put through it that was the problem, at least not normally. And the ammunition we were using was not junk, but was WOLF Match Target, or at least I thought it was. As I pondered what to bend this barrel around, I looked over at my brother-in-law and noticed he was loading magazines with a Remington "Bucket'o Bullets". I asked why he switched. He had run out of the Wolf and didn'y want to get up long enough to retrieve some more. He had had this stuff "for years" and "needed to shoot it up". I brabbed a handfull and immediately new what happened.

This stuff had sat long enough that not only was there no sign of any lubrication, but the lead was oxidized and beginning to become powdery and porous. Now I don't know how many of you have dealt with old ammunition, but these conditions cause the bullet to be larger than nominal diameter and stick quite a lot on their way out of the barrel. I just wanted to recount this story because I know I will never use any ammunition that looks like that again, and I am still wondering how much more fowling it would have taken before the barrel quit passing shrapnel out the front and instead created another non-standard opening in the gun. And as a guess, I am fairly sure this occurred with less than 100 rounds of this ammunition.
 

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I've been thinking of buying one of those Outers "Foul Out" barrel cleaners - I have a lot of old .22's, some of which I didn't clean for months (ok - years :eek: ) probably. I would like to be sure that I get them to a clean state, and then I would like to Moly Fusion them.

Did you by chance Moly Fusion treat that barrel? Would be interesting if you did, and it still built up "hard to remove" fouling.
 

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i would think that if ssdans bbl is that bad, plug the bbl and pour some solvent in and let it sit overnite. sounds like a bore snake wont help. most likely a bristle brush,
copper, i would suspect, with a bit of scrubbing. wont hurt to try if it's that bad. JMO








 

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soak your barrel

SSDan,

My only advice would be to plug your barrel and fill it with some fore of solvent and soak the ring out. Try some MP Pro-7 cleancer and let it stand/soak for a good 1/2 day and scrub the hell out of that barrel. I don't know how throughly you clean your barrel but it's possible the pores of the barrel is too heavly fouled and requires a long solvent soaking. besides I've NEVER had such a condition as to the one you described. Can you tell us just how many rounds that child really shot that day?

wmrimfire,22
 

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This is where you use your Chamber Cleaning Brush that all good RFCers carry in their range box. BRASS bore brush bent into an "L" with one leg long enough to reach a little past front of chamber. Stick brush in chamber through either ejection port or magazine port and into chamber. Twist back and forth for awhile....run patch though barrel....check progress. Repeat as needed. Of course if you had already taken the barrel off it makes it really easy.......just twist BRASS brush round and round. Lead solvent helps either way. Will be shooting again in just a few minutes :)
 

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my lead cleaner

I found out how to make my own lead remover from the Missouri rkba newsletter. Mix equal parts peroxide and white vinegar. Then plug you barrel and pour in . Let stand for a couple of hours and it will desolve the lead. The only problem I have found is that it will remove some chrome, but have had no problems with stainless or blue steel.

rlbubba
An Armed Society is a Polite Society
 
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