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This is my interpretation of how the trigger, sear and disconnector work.



In diagram 1, the trigger group and hammer are shown in the cocked and ready to fire position. The sear is in red and the disconnector is in green. The disconnector is not touching the hammer.

As the trigger is pulled in diagram 2, you can see the whole trigger group rotates about the sear-trigger axis which is the trigger pin. This rotates the sear away from the hammer and the hammer is released. Note the contact between the top of the sear and the belly of the disconnector. This is where the creep comes in.

In diagram 3, the bolt has moved to the extreme rear, forcing the hammer back and down. As the hammer rotates, it depresses the disconnector, releasing the sear. The sear is now free to rotate up against the bottom of the hammer but is not yet engaged in the hook of the hammer. At this time, the trigger is still pulled to the rear.

In diagram 4, the bolt has now moved completely forward and the trigger is still pulled to the rear. The hammer has now rotated up away from the disconnector and is re-engaged by the sear. If the sear doesn't engage correctly at this point, the hammer will be released and follow the bolt as it moves forward and will no longer be cocked. If the sear does stay engaged as the bolt moves forward but then becomes disengaged by the jar of the bolt hitting the breech face, this will cause a slam fire which could go automatic.

In diagram 5, the trigger is released and the trigger group rotates down which allows the disconnector to re-engage. The trigger group is now cocked and ready to fire again.

I hope this helps someone else, it certainly help me to understand how it all works.
 
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