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How hot does a .22lr bullet get when it's fired out of a barrel?
And what is the temperature difference between the bullet as it's just exited the muzzle versus 100 yards out of the muzzle?

Does this depend on the temperature of the barrel at the time the bullet was fired?
 

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No offense, Plaskon, but when you figure out a way to measure the temperature of a bullet in flight, you will probably qualify for a full-ride scholarship at the nation's foremost college of engineering. :p Again, no offense intended. :beerchug:
 

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Plaskon, when I was a kid I noticed that I could a follow the flight of a BB shot out of my BB gun most of the time, could see BB best against a light background,(like the sky) this was a great aid in shooting, could walk a BB in by sight. Most of my sparrow kills were head shots. When I starting shooting a single shot .22 noticed I could do the same with .22 shorts some of the time, by could not see .22 longs or .22 long rifle, they were too fast, interestingly the .22 short lead bullets glowed red for about 25 yards then turned black, told my Granddad about it once, He though I was pulling his leg, but since have spoken to other people who reported the same thing, oh, to have those eyes now, had 15-15 vision as a kid. But the .22 bullet lead glowed red, must have got very hot. Hope this helps. Olypenn22
 

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Could have it been powder burning off the bullet?, color was bright red then turned black. How hot does power burn? lanched under great pressure would not the base of a projectile equal this temperature for its first few seconds of flight? never really thought about it, just saw what I saw. My Grandpa thought I was pulling his leg too. :) Olypenn22
 

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I fly rockets as another hobby- and super-high speed high power freaks can get supersonic speeds- with corresponding heat damage to the nose. Any rocket that actually gets supersonic for more than a second or two burns the paint off the nose from aerodynamic heating. I seem to recall that the Concorde gets pretty hot, as did the SR-71. Stands to reason that bullets would experience similar heating, especially seeing as how centerfire rounds are *very* supersonic. Red hot- probably not quite.

N
 

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Heat would come from three places. Burning powder would add some heat but it is a flash/qick thing like waving your finger thru a candle flame. Most heat would come from friction. First and I think most would be the friction of the bullet against the rifled bore. Second there would be the aerodymanic friction. There are instruments that would measure the heat of the bullet in flight but none of us would have them and few of us could afford them.
 

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OK, so we CAN measure the temperature of a bullet in fllight. Shows you how ignorant I am :bonk: Now, Mr. Plaskon, maybe you will be so kind as to tell us what you intend to do with this bit of exotica? Is there any practical use for this knowledge, is there any there there, why did you ask in the first place? :confused: We are all dying of curiosity (I guess). Or, as I suspect, did we ALL get our legs pulled by your question in the first place? :smashfrea
 

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OH yeah, it can be measured. Have seen temp guns. You point it at a specific item a few feat away it will give you the temp. Used for finding operating temps of moving machinery like bearing temps etc.

Would be interesting to see how much hotter the exiting bullet is on a heated up barrel versus a cold barrel. You know like 22-250 used for varminting.
 

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kinda long...

Good link TheKid. :)

I would guess the first practical knowledge about the IR emitted from a bullet was used back in the 60's when IR detectors on silicon where first developed... at least for civilian use (I am not an expert on the history of this). I have one of the really old and probably close to first chronographs ever made by a company called Schmidt-Weston (many years gone) called the Standard Chronograph that uses TTL logic- and is truly portable with a two pound lead acid battery inside. The two detectors that are cabled to it run off of small 9 volt batteries.

My dad got this from an old fellow even older than himself. It came without cables so it took me some head scratching to figure how to hook it up. It works good on large bullets. Each detector has an IR sensing diode that is covered by a box with a slit in it. The unit starts counting when the first box's slit illuminates the diode, and stops when the second box's slit illuminates the diode. It's a fine piece of engineering for the time, and very accurate. You can separate the detectors by 2', 5', or 10'.

I was surprised it still worked since the previous owner had punched a hole through the first box with a large caliber bullet. It was still a couple of inches from the electronics. He patched it up pretty good though. I figured he was not much of a shot. :)

Then I got my 17 HMR. Had to chrono it. It was hard to pick up that little bullet on the chrono. I was getting about 2555. I was getting closer and closer to the boxes, should have been using a rest, then thwack, I nailed the first box in the same spot the original owner had. Of course the 17 disintegrated unlike normal bullets, and took the head off of the rear signal transistor. :) Just three little bare legs standing there. I have not fixed it yet, but it needs a small signal transistor that is not impossible to come by. I ordered one once but they never delivered. I need to get this fixed this summer. Just another poor shot here. :)

Anyway just thought that story might be interesting. That technology was 45 years old. With computer technology as we know it they probably use "bullet temp" to design everything from 17 HMR's to modern weapons of mass destruction.

To me this is a very interesting question. I will repeat it:

"How hot does a .22lr bullet get when it's fired out of a barrel?
And what is the temperature difference between the bullet as it's just exited the muzzle versus 100 yards out of the muzzle?

Does this depend on the temperature of the barrel at the time the bullet was fired?"

******

Well, I don't know... lol

Tonight my wife and I where working on the boat, and she was taking off a nut on a battery that was stubborn. She finally got it off, picked it up and dropped it. That's hot... I had to explain it was friction, and not a short circuit. Uhmm, they call me 'Sparky'... :)

Anyone know something about those old chronographs I would like to hear it.

barbwire
 
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