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Hey Kent...My new stock is coming!

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Kent, my stock for the CZ American is being made...should be here in a month or less! AA quilted maple with rosewood trim. I went with a brown, 1/2" field pad instead of the stainless buttpad because it would have cost me a bunch more to get the wood out to my 14 1/4" LOP. I hope the stocks are as good as you say. I can tell you that their service is friendly and helpful. He says he has orders for 4 more already. :t :t :t
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Great news--I'm sure you can't wait. The stocks are very good but there is some work in finishing the inletting and the final sanding and finishing. I've always bedded actions in Brownells steel bed anyway so that wasn't a problem. Wood will need to be removed here and there for a proper fit. But if you've done this before you know that. My advise it to take your time and don't get in a rush. I know you'll want to get the rifle set into the wood as soon as you get it, but work deliberately, take your time. If I can answer any questions, please email me. I want to know what you think about it when it arrives. I've never worked with maple. I like English walnut best for inletting and checkering but I've grown to like Claro a lot for the figure and beauty. Best of luck. If I can help--please let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks...nope, never done this before. I have heard the maple is a little harder to work with, but I wanted something that has a different look to it, yet is a solid wood, not synthetic or laminated. I thought about a thumbhole, but thought a standard monte carlo would be stronger in every day use.

By the way, what kind of oil? I have boiled linseed and lemon oil here at the house. Should I get some tongue oil instead? I will not be staining it, and want a natural color to show the maple's figure and the contrast between the maple and rosewood.

Also, can I finish them together, or should I take care when filling the grain not to get rosewood dust in the maple and vice versa?

Thanks,

Bill
 

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Bill-
I have found through trial and error over the past twenty-five years that Birchwood Casey's Tru-oil works best for me. After I get the stock sanded perfectly the way(usually 320 grit) I want it, to fill the wood and seal it I then do small sections at a time--maybe 2'' square--I dip my finger in the oil and put it on the small section of stock-then take a piece of 320 grit paper and sand it with the grain just short strokes--you're making a filler out of the wood--when you have made a enough filler paste to cover the area you are working--then take the heel of you hand and rub the paste across the grain--pushing the filler you've made into the pores of the wood. Do the entire stock this way--it'll look like crap--but you will have made your filler out of the wood and it will save several coats of finish in the end. I usually let this dry for at least a day--maybe two depending on humidity. Then the next step is boring and tough--I take 0000 steel wood and rub the entire stock back to the wood--it'll leave the filler in the pores. After that, I keep adding a coat and rubbing it back off until there are no pores unfilled. The final two coats I leave on and let it dry for three to four days--the I polish it out with McGuires Cleaner Wax --the stuff in the Burgandy bottle--I know it's a car wax but it works great-it's a very mild abrasive and polish. You can polish one of these oil finishes out like glass if you're careful--if you rub through the finish just touch up that little area and when it drys polish it again. This make a great finish--but it isn't easy.
 
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