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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I recently acquired a match style trigger online and let me tell you, this sucker is heavy. 13.1 oz to be exact. I took a magnet to the body, trigger and guard. All are ferromagnetic. It appears to be of cast construction, with evidence of milling on the flat mating surfaces. The hammer has a dimple where the factory hammer has a bump out. It has an adjustable over travel screw, which seems to be uncommon on the commonly posted match triggers.

I really can't decide whether I've stumbled on something awesome or mad. If anyone can assist in identifying this trigger group, it would be much appreciated.

PS. My otherwise factory 10/22, with Troy T22 quad rail chassis (heavy) and this trigger group clocks in at a whopping 7 lbs 8 oz. Yikers. More on that in a different thread.

PPS. The mag release is nonmagnetic alloy with a slight gold tinge. The seller claims it breaks at 2.2 lbs. No scale, but my finger agrees.




 

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OEM cast TG that looks to have been bead blasted with new style OEM MIM hammer..apparently been worked (stoned) .. because that hammer and sear in new/original cond. break at approx. 5.5-6 lbs. - Overtravel and a funky trigger return set-up on the trigger shoe. VQ cast mag release.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OEM cast TG that looks to have been bead blasted with new style OEM MIM hammer..apparently been worked (stoned) .. because that hammer and sear in new/original cond. break at approx. 5.5-6 lbs. - Overtravel and a funky trigger return set-up on the trigger shoe. VQ cast mag release.
Thanks, do you know of any good introductory material on the stoning process? I have a small handful of factory triggers that need work, and every wet stone from a very course 60 to a very fine 10k grit.
 

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Stoning a trigger without a jig is a potential recipe for disaster. I bought a lightly used Power Custom jig a few years back. That's the way it's done if you want it right, otherwise you take your chances. I did actually do a hammer using a machinist's vise per a Sticky on how to change the hammer cocking shelf angle, it worked pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats likely a trigger group that came from an AMT 10/22. Chase is correct regarding the hammer & mag release.

AMT has been out of business for some time.
Thanks. AMT was the magic word. "Steel" and "stainless" "trigger" bring up all sorts of results.

Searching now, it seems folks have very mixed opinions on these things. I find myself feeling a little mixed as well. At 7.5lbs, this "heavy concept" 10/22 can be blitzed like a machine gun and stay on target. The sights just don't move. I like it. I hate it. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Welp I took the AMT trigger assembly down. The trigger return spring was weak (no reset) so I stretched it out since i didn't have a replacement. There are two different aluminum washers, one that goes between one side of the trigger and sear, and another that goes between the trigger and the frame. Makes reassembly about 100x more difficult. Something I will get to joyfully relive when I replace the return spring for real.

Oh, and the hammer was definitely stoned. Not too much, just not hooked like the factory. The tutorial was very helpful in understanding and inspecting all of the pieces.
 

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You said they are two different aluminum washers, AMT never used any washers in the trigger housing group. This trigger group sounds like it was worked over nice, they may have used some parts from AMT as well as parts from others.
I'm not sure if washers/shims were used back when AMT was in business but custom parts were always being made and tried so never know. Every AMT trigger group I have never had a shim/washer.
If you make yourself a slave pin that is the exact inside width you then put your pieces together using the slave pin to side them in place, then once lined up drive your final pin in while knocking the slave pin out. I'm sure there are slave pin around or get some extra/old pins and cut them down to fit.
They always come in handy especially if you are using shims. I thought shims were of brass because that slide best, never heard of aluminum ones. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You said they are two different aluminum washers, AMT never used any washers in the trigger housing group. This trigger group sounds like it was worked over nice, they may have used some parts from AMT as well as parts from others.
I'm not sure if washers/shims were used back when AMT was in business but custom parts were always being made and tried so never know. Every AMT trigger group I have never had a shim/washer.
If you make yourself a slave pin that is the exact inside width you then put your pieces together using the slave pin to side them in place, then once lined up drive your final pin in while knocking the slave pin out. I'm sure there are slave pin around or get some extra/old pins and cut them down to fit.
They always come in handy especially if you are using shims. I thought shims were of brass because that slide best, never heard of aluminum ones. :eek:
Hah, I agree they are very roughly hewn aluminum at that. If I were to rework things, bronze phosphor would be my first choice. Though interesting that you say that AMT's have no washers/bushings because the stainless trigger (which I am assuming is AMT as well) really needs the aluminum bushing between the trigger and housing to eliminate play. There is maybe an 1/8" of gap that needs filled.

I am not dissatisfied. It breaks clean and the reset/travel is excellent now that it's fixed.

Do you have any ideas on where to source material for a slave pin? Is it a standard size? I don't own a caliper.

On that subject, if I follow what you are saying, the slave pin needs to be short enough to pre-assemble and drop into the housing. This last time, I ended up working the trigger/seer assembly from both sides using the extractor pin (same diameter). The extractor pin shot thru first, but too long. I then chased it with the correct pin and sweet success.
 

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Couple of comments:

The aluminum shims could have been made from a beverage can. I used to puch them from beer & soda cans with a cheap punch that I got at Harbor Freight.

The slave pin doesn't necessarily need to be made from metal, although I used a drill bit to make mine. You can use a wooded(bamboo) skewer, kitchen match, etc.

If you're going to be messing around with 10/22 triggers much, I'd very much recommend the "Gunsmither 10/22 Safe-T Tool. Gunsmither is a sponser here & makes really thoughtful products. It's $18.95 shipped and comes with a slave pin, and very usefull when tinkering with triggers.

ETA - The diameter of the trigger/sear pin is approx. .125" (1/8")
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Couple of comments:

The aluminum shims could have been made from a beverage can. I used to puch them from beer & soda cans with a cheap punch that I got at Harbor Freight.

The slave pin doesn't necessarily need to be made from metal, although I used a drill bit to make mine. You can use a wooded skewer, kitchen match, etc.

If you're going to be messing around with 10/22 triggers much, I'd very much recommend the "Gunsmither 10/22 Safe-T Tool. Gunsmither is a sponser here & makes really thoughtful products. It's $18.95 shipped and comes with a slave pin, and very usefull when tinkering with triggers.
Hah, wow. That is so spot on with the tin can. Tho there is a thicker shim that looks like it was hacksawn off an alum rod and drilled by hand. I don't think it's really even concentric! Oh well, it works.

Handy looking tool. I think I need that in my life.
 

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Hah, wow. That is so spot on with the tin can. Tho there is a thicker shim that looks like it was hacksawn off an alum rod and drilled by hand. I don't think it's really even concentric! Oh well, it works.

Handy looking tool. I think I need that in my life.
Emman, I've found over the years of playing with these triggers, that shims aren't really that important. They're ok to take the side to side slop out of a hammer, but they don't do a whole lot for the trigger & disco. Actually, because of the spring pressure from the hammer spring on the hammer, there is very little, if anything that can be gained. When the triggered is cocked & ready to fire, the hammer spring & the trigger re-set spring keeps everything tight enough so that you don't really realize any side to side wobble.

Plus...the Harbor Freight punch is junk. It works, but the tolerances aren't close & the shim edges come out curled away from the od & id of the shim. Don't waste you're money at Harbor Freight & let us RFC members help you spend your $$$$. We love spending other people's money!;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Emman, I've found over the years of playing with these triggers, that shims aren't really that important. They're ok to take the side to side slop out of a hammer, but they don't do a whole lot for the trigger & disco. Actually, because of the spring pressure from the hammer spring on the hammer, there is very little, if anything that can be gained. When the triggered is cocked & ready to fire, the hammer spring & the trigger re-set spring keeps everything tight enough so that you don't really realize any side to side wobble.

Plus...the Harbor Freight punch is junk. It works, but the tolerances aren't close & the shim edges come out curled away from the od & id of the shim. Don't waste you're money at Harbor Freight & let us RFC members help you spend your $$$$. We love spending other people's money!;)
I meant the gunsmither 10/22 thingy, but I think we're on the same page here. Harbor freight is for two things, pipe wrenches and weird oversized drill bits that would otherwise cost 79 bucks at an online specialty shop. I have family members that buy cordless tools there, but that is a story for another day...
 

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Maybe I wasn't clear, AMT never installed shims in any of their stuff but that doesn't mean they were so perfect and others didn't shim certain things in them. :bthumb:
Not knocking any brands and I'm sure others were shimmed as well. Not all parts were CNC perfect for cost and slop in tolerances.
That is what makes learning your stuff so fun as not all are exact and learning what helps and why is the long road but fun if you don't take yourself too serious. Heck it was only a few years ago that I started learning all this and still many more years to catch up with all you others.
Enjoy!
 
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