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I am purchasing a single shot Winchester .22 from a gentleman for a VERY good price but I've only seen the rifle one time and I cannot find anything online that will help me identify this rifle.

Here are the details. It is a single shot but it ejects the fired case. (kind of a semi auto but it's a single shot). If anyone can point me in the right direction to research this or if you have any ideas, that would be great.

Thanks!
 

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That thar is a Model 55

Hi Timberghost,

You have a Winchester Model 55 there. The Blue Book says that over 45,000 were made between 1958 and 1961. The rifle should be marked with the model number somewhere on the barrel. You should do a search on this forum for this rifle. There have been a number of posts over time concerning it, some quite recent.

Hossfeathers
 

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Another way to check on if it is a 55 is if it fires from an open bolt. In other words when you pull the trigger the bolt snaps forward and the shell fires. This is a very unusual design for a .22 and my guess i$ the 55 will become more collectible a$ time goe$ on.
 

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Happy Gardener..
I had only vaguely skimmed over a mention of the Winchester Model 55 Single Shot .22RF semi-auto a year or so ago. I think it mentioned it was "Slam Fire Operated). My main question is if the bolt is open before firing, how is the round kept chambered? So far I haven't found anything on it with a Web search. There are however auction pictures.
An interesting note is that Winchester also had another Model 55, A Center Fire Lever action!

Seems that the semi-auto is more of a "Curiosity Piece" than a practical firearm. I see that they are bringing more money than one would suspect. It would fit right at home along side a Model 99 Thumb Trigger!


Regards, JAck
 

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I have only read about the 55. I believe you chamber the round manualy then when you pull the trigger the bolt slams shut and fires the cartridge. The advantage is ease of operation with no bolt to open and close. The way old Winchesters are appreciating in price it seems a oddball design like this has a bright future as long as your cost is reasonable. I wish I had a old thumbtrigger myself. My best investment the last three years is my 401-W.
 
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