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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is, is a .22lr enough to shoot a goat with (assuming you can get to relatively short range)? I know it has been sone by plenty of people, but I want your advice on whether you think it would be ok or not. I have a suppressed barrel Remington .22lr rifle with a 4 x 32 scope (normally used for rebbits and possums).
Thanks for any opinions or advice in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the opinion Antlurz. Yeah, thats what I figured. Need to get into a position where you can get a good solid head shot at reasonably close range.
 

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Xman,

For an animal that looks to weigh 80 to 100 pounds on the hoof, I would recommend a .223 Rem [5.56mm] as a minimum, and personally, I would use a .243 Win or a .257 Roberts.

Yes, I know you can "kill" a 1,200 Whitefaced Herford with a .22LR.....! !
[I have done it several times]

However, that is NOT to say one should hunt 1,200 pound animals with a .22LR. ......! ! :(

There is a VAST difference between "killing" an animal, under controlled conditions at point blank range, and "hunting" an animal in the wild..... :eek:

Xman, the above comments are for those who are new to shooting and hunting...... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By preference I would use a .223, but if I am culling possums in the area with my .22lr, I was wanting to gauge whether (in ideal circumstances) it would do the job. I realise that a .22lr is not a weapon you would use with the express purpose of goat shooting, but both Possums and Goats are pests here that need getting rid of. Local authorities are keen for me to get as many goats as I can, and I'm not going to carry 2 rifles when out possum shooting.
Just gauging overall opinion on whether it is
1. doable
2. a good or a bad idea in the circumstances

Thanks for the advice.
 

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I would judge that you are talking about a vital area about the diameter of a beer can. If you aren't totally confident that you can put the shot in a circle that size, you would be looking for trouble.

BigMike is right. What can be done, and what should be done are completely different arguements. The decision of which arguement to side with is largely dependent on your personal abilities, and you are the one that needs to make that distinction...;) A big difference between "possible" and "practical"...

Ron
 

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Xman,

Are you restricted in the weapons you may purchase...? ?
[eg: no military calibers, no semi-autos, etc.. ]

As Dwight has noted, an SKS with some cheap Wolf soft point ammo would do the job very nicely. However, it would make a lot more NOISE than your suppressed .22......! ! :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not restricted in caliber, just in type of weapon (no military style rifles) which is not relavent to the problem.
Noise is an issue as the area is not normally hunted, and people who use the area are not really expecting firearms use in the area. The only real firearms use is for pest control and is to be as unobtrusive as possible.
Still, I take your point. I am confident in my shooting abilities, and if the opportunity presents itself in a perfect setup (where I am absolutely confident of a killing close range headshot) then I might take it. Otherwise I guess I'll just have to make more frequent seperate trips.
 

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Xman,
we're in (roughly) the same neck of the woods - I do my hunting in the Wairarapa.

I started out with a 10/22 for possums (spotlighting), but during the day wound up knocking over goats @ 30-60yards.
Yes, the 10/22 did the job - usually first shot (if I had time to set it up), but otherwise the "semi-auto" follow-up shot worked.

Even though I was knocking them over, I still felt that I needed "more power" (as if you _really_ NEED a reason), so I bought a 10/22magnum. The magnum is definitely better suited to goats and does an excellent job "poofing" possums & hares @ night too. The long-range abilities of the magnum really shows when picking off magpies as well.

So there you go - if you're restricted to just "one" rifle, maybe you should consider a .22WMR - hey, it worked for me.

Notice I said _worked_ for me ?
I've since upgraded to a .223 Tikka for goating - mainly because the goats in the area are decidely gun-shy now (how did that happen) and the 30yard shots are fewer and farther apart.
 

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Kiwi's information please

I'm over on your side of the pond every year (usually Nov or Dec.) for business, and I was wondering how difficult it would be to bring along a rifle and do a little pest hunting while I was there? I've read where New Zealand does allow this and the license fee is pretty reasonable, but how difficult would it be to find someplace on the North Island to hunt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bringing the rifle over may be a bit of a paperwork nightmare (not sure).
As for finding somewhere in the north island to hunt possums, rabbits, and goats- that shouldn't be a problem. Possums, rabbits, goats, and even deer and Thar are introduced pests here and you shouldn't find it difficult to get the opportunity to hunt for them.
 

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I personally hate the idea of using a 22lr on a goat. I raise goats, and have seen them fail to go down with a point blank shot to the head with a .45. There is a space between the ear and the eye on the side of a goat's head where you can aim towards the eye on the other side of the head that is usually a killing shot. The skull is very hard, and will deflect some shots. I know that many will say that they have killed goats with a 22lr, but as I said, for the sake of the animal, I hate the idea. I just don't think you can be that confident of a killing shot.

Besides, if you send a screaming goat off with a head wound and it runs through a campsite or whatever, the people that aren't used to weapons fire might get a little upset, don't you think?
 

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A very well placed shot from a 22lr will result in a clean kill on many animals.

From experience, if you can see both eyes on a goat and try a headshot you will have to shoot again.

A shot from ten feet directly between the eyes with a 44 mag hp created a very confused 12 year old and goat. It actually stood up after the shot and considered it's limited options from there.

The goat was ill, terminal and contagious. The vet suggested putting it down to prevent spreading the virus.

It took two shots, the last one going behind the ear. Any mercy kill after that was one shot.

A 22lr placed just behind the ear should be an instant kill.
 

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Hi Mate,

I think you already have a reasonable idea on what work's and what dosn't , target distance/ killing power and noise are all factors.
The only real reason to use a weapon of such limited power and range as the .22LR round is very close and silenced , as you already use.
In thick bush that has not been shot out , a silenced semi-auto .22LR will work well, but anything over 50 m is like pushing it. And if in the area you hunt distance is more variable than very short range 30-50 m , you well need a cartridge with more range and power.
In normal use I think the following cartridges all have good point's for hunting goats with, 22 Mag, 22 Hornet and the 223 Rem , 22 Mag being very cheap and good if you do not reload.
If you reload the Hornet and 223 Rem are very good choice's , and as you are a Kiwi , you can have any of these weapon's mounted with a silencer/suppressor , this well reduce the PR problem in curtain area's you hunt in.

I myself like the 223 Rem as a good goat round, but as you know already the humble goat is a very tuff animal , and shot placement is critical, I have seen goat's shot side on at close range with 12ga slug and show no reaction at all and run off into the scrub.
Sometimes the animal is dead , but it take's a while for the simple goat to realise it, I have hunted them a bit with a suppressed 308 rifle using full hunting load's , and the suppressor disguisied the sound of the shot enough so I had time to drop 3 or more animal's due to the reduced sound signature.
 

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another option

i have read the entire thread and didn't see any one mention a .17 HMR. Is this because you weren't thinking of it or because you feel it would be too little gun? I would look at it as a viable option, it's quite and if the main game is possum i would think the HMR to be perfect medicine.
 

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Wombat..

What I'm going to say is only guesswork, as I've never shot a 17, however much has been said about the violent explosiveness of the projectile. Many profess that the goat has a tough skull. I'm not terribly inclined to think of it that way in any strong terms, however, lets say they are right. If you put both of those situations together, it seems to me you would have a large percentage of shots ending up less than satisfactory especially if the bullet strike wasn't at a directly perpendicular angle. A nasty surface wound that didn't get the job done.

Admittedly, I'm only guessing here. If the skull can be demonstrated to be that tough, you don't want an explosive bullet, I'd think..

Others may have an entirely different view of the subject.

Ron
 

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I agree with you totaly, i was thinking more in the way of a shot to the vitals not the head.

This may be a situation where a controled expansion bullet would be usefull, maybe we need to get on the horn to the Barnes people to make a .17 calibre x-bullet.
 
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