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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
ok, so, i got bit by the 10/22 bug, i can deal with that (not sure about the Mrs. though). i got a used one for $99 with the laminated stock, works well i guess. I just ordered a Volquortezn (sp?) bolt buffer & Clerke 16" BBL from clips & stuff because of the price. now, i've been reading here about some problems and i'm a little paraniod about doing any work now. The problems i've seen here include : broken V-Blocks, stripped V-block screw holes, cracked recievers and other various tales of woe.

Now, should i NOT free float my 16" BBL for fear of cracking the reciever? If not, im not good at serious stock work, i.e: bedding the barrel. i know to sand out the barrel channel with a 1" dowel & sand paper, however, if i have to support the barrel i was thinking of this: Lay down a layer of fiberglass resin (catalyzed)about 1" back from the end of the stock and for about 4 inches back from that. then I would wrap the barrel in saran wrap. I would then place the action & barrel assembly into the stock using the saran wrap to protect the barrel and leave it till the resin was hard. Would this work ok to support the barrel?

Also, I'm worried about stripping the V- block screws, any advice on propper tightening? other than dont over-tighten it i mean :smashfrea
Thanks in advance! -Eric :snipersmi - :bunny:
 

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I've not had any direct experience with breaking V blocks or stripping threads--maybe someone who has can post what NOT to do. In general, the advice I would give is to always keep in mind that the received is aluminum and to exercise proper technique accordingly. Shouldn't tighten down those screws until they just absolutely won't budge any further or use them to force a tight barrel into the receiver, those sorts of things. Just use the V block as a means of keeping things together--if you're worried about working loose, use blue Lock-tite. And then I doubt that you'll break any V blocks either unless you're unfortunate enough to have one with a manufacturing defect, in which case it's only a few bucks to replace anyway so wouldn't be a big deal.

As far as free-floating the barrel, I doubt that would cause the receiver to crack any time soon, but barrel droop would certainly be possible, even probable ovr time with a heavy bull barrel. So, I think it important to provide some support, either by bedding the first few inches ahead of the receiver or providing a pressure pad near the end of the stock (standard placement of the factory stock, if you don't want to experiment with the precisely correct placement).

I would buy a bedding kit and follow the directions religiously with respect to using the release agent included in the kit. If you're ABSOLUTELY positive the epoxy won't glue the barrel to the stock if wrapped in Saran wrap go for it, but the price of failure is steep--about $99 plus the cost of your modifications in your case because if the Saran wrap doesn't do the job as a stand-in release agent that stock and barrel/receiver assembly ain't ever coming apart. For me, the $15 or so for the bedding kit is worth the saving in stress and worry. Too many posts about glue, er bedding failures. If you get a kit and follow directions I don't find bedding needs to be that hard or a major project, for a barrel at least. Bedding the action and all of that is harder, might not want to try that until you're a little more experienced.

There's lots of posts on your questions, if you do a search, with lots of good advice.

For what that's worth....
 

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what GD said or if you want a totally free floated barrel, check out the user list and find my nickname. search through my topics (or just search RFC for dual takedown lugs)and you'll see i did a write-up on dual takedown lug conversion. i dont like working w/bedding material(although it is effective) so i took a different route and fabbed up a second screw location. there are even aftermarket receivers that have 2 takedown points. "MOA" makes one and its made of steel.....no cracking there. BUT i doubt the aluminum receiver will ever crack if you shim your bull barrel shank correctly, or use a bump pad, and dont use a 10lb barrel! heh

happy searching...sounds like your addiction has just begun.
 

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To make things easy on you, just buy a Volquartsen bedding kit. It consists of an aluminum pillar, a modified drill bit to install the pillar with and a piece of foam tape. Just follow the directions. It's almost impossible to screw it up.

swampf0x
 

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The trick to tightening the V-block screws is easy. Just buy a starter kit from WeaponKraft and you get the lifetime buffer, a hexhead takedown screw, and a really neat wrench which will begin to flex at the proper tightness for the V-block screws and the takedown screw. If you keep the screws at the same torque time after time your accruacy will remain the same day to day.
As to cracking the receiver, I have seen aluminum frames get stress cracks around pin holes...on a .45 Auto. Never seen one on a Ruger!
Hope this helps somewhat.
 

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For the long screws that go through the V-block, you should use anti-seize on the bolt threads. The bolts are steel and the receiver is aluminum. Just tighten them up snug, and no more. They won't come loose. I've never had any loosen up.
Don
Edit to add: Buy a bedding kit from Brownell's called Acraglass Gel. It has all of the things needed to do the job. The instructions that come with the kit are very good, just follow them and you won't have any trouble. The release agen that comes with the kit is the right thing to use when bedding, not saran wrap. I just bedded a 10-22 today with the Acraglass gel. For a .920 steel barrel I would bed about 3 inches in front of the receiver. That's how I bed bull barrels on my 10-22s.
 

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maybe one more item, if you are gonna float the bbl, start with no larger than a 3/4"
gizmo; broomstick, socket, pvc pipe, etc. not 1", or your sides will be too wide and will have some side to side movement. keep it as close as possible.
i like to use a biz card to check for clearance.








 

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Dr. Mongoose said:
If you keep the screws at the same torque time after time your accruacy will remain the same day to day.
The only problem with this, as with ALL wooden stocks, is that they swell and change dimensions, albeit slightly, over time, and within different environmental conditions.

As Mongoose alluded, consistency is the key to accuracy, which is why you should not use "bumper pads" or other pressure points on the barrel - 'cause they aren't going to remain at a constant pressure from day to day, takedown to takedown - at least not in a wooden stock.

15 years of playing with dozens of 10/22s with bull barrels and I only had one V-block crack. It was more than 10 years old and had been R&R'ed dozens of times. I keep a couple extra of most of these small screws and parts on-hand in the 'kit'.

If you're concerned about stress on the aluminum receiver, then bed it, and feel free to bed about an inch or so of the barrel - you'll be more than good to go.

dbuckbee said:
Edit to add: Buy a bedding kit from Brownell's called Acraglass Gel. It has all of the things needed to do the job. The instructions that come with the kit are very good, just follow them and you won't have any trouble. The release agen that comes with the kit is the right thing to use when bedding, not saran wrap.
Acraglass is a great all-around bedding and fix-it compound. It's cheap and worth having around for more than just gunstocks and stuff. Go for it. :t :t :t
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I love this place!

Thanks to all you guys for your advice, I'm starting to feel better about this whole "project" gun thing. keep'em coming!

By the way, i looked for "locktite" today cause alot of people here talk about using it to hold the screws in their holes. the only locktite i could find was an actual epoxy adhesive glue with all the other "super glues" and epoxy glues. didnt get it, i got some regular "Thread lock" that comes in a very small, very expensive blue bottle it says its made to hold screws in tight. i wonder if anyone i.e: newbie has ever bought the real locktite and permenantly glued their projects together?

Also, i took the factory barrel out of my 10/22 today for the first time and found it to be fairly loose in the receiver (the V-block was not on). I am wondering if anyone knows if the Clerke barrels are a nice tight fit? i would like to free float the 16" bbl i got without worrying about barrel droop. if its loose, i'll follow the advice for bedding that you guys gave me. thanks- Eric

BrianB, even laminated stocks are subject to swelling and shrinking?
 

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I'm not sure that using loctite on steel screws in an aluminum receiver is a good thing. The "school solution" for steel in aluminum is anti-seize. I used lots of it building a Corvair engine 30 years ago.
Don
 

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Thread lock is the stuff. The blue (in Loctite's brand) is medium strength and can be undone without extraordinary measures.

Anti-seize in the cited engine application (aluminum-to-steel) is to prevent dissimiliar metal corrosion, which results in the two parts 'welding' together. The downside is that with it, they won't be inclined to hold together, which is what the loctite is supposed to help with. The loctite should also prevent direct contact of the metals and shoud inhibit any dissimiliar metal corrosion (rust) so you have the best of both.
 

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I don't think Lock-tite (or similar thread locker) is necessary, and don't use it myself on the V Block screws--would only use it if you're worried about having them come loose and therefore might be prone to overtightening. As others have said, don't need to get them really tight. Use a torque wrench if you want absolute "repeatability", or the long flexible head wrench to get a "feel" indicator of sufficient tightness. And unless you do benchrest or similar events where extreme accuracy is important, it's not that important to get the exact tightness.

If you do choose to use Lock-tite or similar it's important to get the right product. There are different types, some virtually impossible to remove (red Lock-tite is an example).

And all wood stocks are subject to change with weather conditions, even laminates although they would change less than "solid" wood. Moisture/water vapor is the main thing, with temperature also having an impact. With a laminate the affect shouldn't be a big deal for a recreational shooter, more of a concern perhaps if you do the extreme accuracy thing. You can worry about that later if you go in that direction. If you're really concerned about the changes get a good synthetic stock, but I'd much rather have a good laminate than a cheap synthetic.

Of all of the modifications you've mentioned the bedding is the most-difficult but if you use the techniques/kits others have mentioned, instead of the Saran wrap approach (be SURE to use the release agent that comes with the kit) you should be fine. I'd rather free-float and bed than do the pressure point approach because the proper pressure point will change with different conditions and ammo, but if you're uncomfortable with bedding I think it's easier, and should provide acceptable results for the majority of shooters.

You can do it! Go for it, and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times...

What a stressful 24 hours its been. last night i took to sanding out the channel for the new bull barrel, took 3 hours, result? messed up and too big (i used a smaller sized socket as my sanding base), the barrel/action moved back & forth in the stock. I am not a patient man , and neither am i apparently a compitent man. i just am not able to wait and work on a gun over extended periods of time. i cant stand to have a gun thats not working, sited in or ready to go, so, i broke down and bought a butler creek target stock today before i went to the range.

So, heres whats been done to my "Ultimate" so far, fairly generic, but i really am happy with it:
Ruger reciever off used 10/22
Clerke 16" BBL from Clips & Stuff (WOW!! what great service and delivery!!)
Volquarsen bolt buffer also from clips & Stuff
bushnell 6X40mm scope W/ tasco rings
Butler creek target stock
Harris bipod, 6"-9" model
Beartooth stock sock w/ pocket
super sling
2 BC 25 rnd mags

I went to the range today and worked everything out... OH MY GOD!!! i have never owned a serious shooter like this! i couldnt believe what this gun was capable of!! granted, the trigger is kinda strong, but i was doing rapid fire and making tight little groups inside little bullseyes! I gotta tell you, im not as serious of a shooter and gunsmithing kinda guy as most of you awesome dudes are here, but i was amazed with the Clerke barrel. for being so inexpensive it shot rings around my marlin 880sq. I am currently shooting CCI Mini-mag HP out of it and i am complete Ruger fan now. I will be going further later when the funds come back up with a trigger kit. thanks to all you guys here for your help & interest! -Eric
 

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I always cringe when I dissassemble a gun that someone has used loc-tite on...

*** do you really need it for? Properly tightened nuts will NOT loosen with moderate use. Besides, if you clean your firearm regularly, you won't want that stuff in there.

Especially don't use it on rings or bases.
 
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