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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next week "Gun Smoke" is celebrating fifty years with fifty hours of no commercial programing. You'll have to search for it and set your recorders or Tivo if you wish. I have been Tivoing the shows for some time on the "Western" channel and watching with interest the programs from 1963 with James Arness, a very young Burt Reyonalds as "Clint" the blacksmith, and of course Doc and Kitty. The shows features a different actor as the the main topic to really develop the character each week. A strong theme of Morality of one kind or another is suggested also.
About investment firearm prices... Think what a dollar buys today. My wife can spend $200 plus weekly for food. Licquor prices and cigarettes are ludicrus. A new car is how much?
The 'Gun Smoke" shows have a shot of wiskey at $0.10 and a bottle at $1.00, or a meal at the price of a bottle of whiskey.
A new rifle at maybe $25 or so... and a horse the cost of two or three rifles...Salaries were in line with the times I guess, so money was tight then also.
If you enjoy non challaging viewing that always has a good outcome, check out the aniversary shows in black and white next week and every week on the "Western/spaghetti" channel.
Pete K.


 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Rembrandt

Rembrandt said:
Are we really sure Miss Kitty only sold Wiskey?
Have you ever watched "Deadwood" on cable? Now that's tough stuff even by todays standards.
Miss "Kitty" has a little love interest going on with Matt, but he's to focused on bein' the marshall that he doesn't notice and Doc has to tell him to go visit Miss Kitty cause she's in a hissy fit because of his three day absence.!! Now the bar gals are there to keep a lonely guy company and to promote licquor sales, right?
Right....
By morals I mean, when Marshall Dillon could have, but didn't shoot a bank robber in the back cause the guy had saved Matts life when he was younger. Matt would git him latter even risking the towns rath. Good stuff here. Or his unspoken friendship and understanding of Quint the 1/2 Indian blacksmith (Burt Reyonlds) and the prejudice Quint faces. More good stuff!! Quint will go to Matts side and back him without being asked with a hammer, bow, knife or fists in return of Matts frienship. Really good stuff!!
Doc possesses the wisdom of age and practice, and keeps a fatherly eye on everyone with quiet observation or suggestion. The "clip it e clop" music is relaxing and you never get upset at the outcome as good always wins out over evil!! Supper stuff!!

Any movie with horses in it can't be bad, that's my feeling..
http://comp.uark.edu/~tsnyder/gunsmoke/gun-a-v.html
play the 1955 theme, third dot down...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v64/pdexter46/Gunsmokegroup2.jpg
Quote from James Arness biography...
As the story goes, CBS wanted Wayne for the part when the series was adapted from radio to television. He declined, but suggested his good friend for the part. CBS agreed to audition the 6-foot-7-
Audio of John Wayne introducing James Arness as Gunsmokes Marshal Matt Dillon.. http://www.fiftiesweb.com/usa/john-wayne-gunsmoke.mp3
Free radio show downloads of pre-tv westerns and more...
http://www.radiolovers.com/pages/westerns.html
Enjoy,
Pete K.



 

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You're right, good stuff. I always wanted Matt's lineback buckskin horse. That must have been a big animal, as James Arness would have dwarfed a standard sized quarter horse. I finally got a lineback dun with all the black points and thought about Matt Dillon ofttimes while riding him. My son even worked with him until he could shoot a revolver off him without getting dumped. :t
 

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fullchoke said:
Lineback buckskin; lineback dun. You've been readin' Louis L'Amour :D :D :t :t
Nope, been there. This was my old horse "Willy". In his prime he could put wind around your ears. Notice the black points, lineback, mane, tail and legs.
He came off the Russel Klotz ranch and had some King breeding.

:)
 

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Not a big fan of the character "Chester Good" (Dennis Weaver), but "Festus Hagen" (Ken Curtis) was about as funny as they get. Hearing him and Doc (Milburn Stone) go back and forth was the highlight of the show.

...Festus had a mule, can't think what he called it?.....
 

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I racked on that one...I'm like Rembrandt I never really cared much for Chester and I think Quint shoulda stayed around longer. They really started slipping with that tall blond headed kid...I can't think of his name but he was on there a lot longer than he should've been.
Who can name Chester's cousins that came to visit on more than one occasion?
Dwight

His name was Thad...(the tall blonde headed kid not the cousins :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Educator, Burt got real busy....

Educator said:
I racked on that one...I'm like Rembrandt I never really cared much for Chester and I think Quint shoulda stayed around longer. They really started slipping with that tall blond headed kid...I can't think of his name but he was on there a lot longer than he should've been.
Who can name Chester's cousins that came to visit on more than one occasion?
Dwight

His name was Thad...(the tall blonde headed kid not the cousins :) )
After his Gunsmoke fame during the '50s.
Reynolds performed on live television in the 1950's and has made more than 200 TV appearances, including such series as "Riverboat", "Gunsmoke", "Hawk", "Dan August" and "B.L. Stryker", which Burt produced in his native Florida. He additionally hosted his very own highly-rated specials titled "Burt Reynolds' Conversations with...".

He is equally at home on the legitimate stage, having performed in New York as well as in numerous productions throughout the country. His professional stage debut was with Charlton Heston in the 1956 New York revival of "Mr. Roberts", directed by John Forsythe.He made his Broadway debut in "Look, We've Come Through" for director Jose Quintero. Reynolds has directed eight productions, and starred in two, at the Jupiter Theatre which he founded in Jupiter, Florida. He also toured the United States with his one man show entitled "An Evening with Burt Reynolds" and continues to perform the piece occasionally when time permits.
Thereafter he was involved in special T.V. appearances and big screen.
Pete K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Educator, Thad became a deputy!!

Educator said:
I racked on that one...I'm like Rembrandt I never really cared much for Chester and I think Quint shoulda stayed around longer. They really started slipping with that tall blond headed kid...I can't think of his name but he was on there a lot longer than he should've been.
Who can name Chester's cousins that came to visit on more than one occasion?
Dwight

His name was Thad...(the tall blonde headed kid not the cousins :) )
Roger Ewing as Thad Greenwood, deputy (1965-67)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v64/pdexter46/RogerEwingthad1.jpg
Birth Date: January 12, 1942 / Age: 63
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California
Pete K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Gunsmoke and prices of the day,

The stagecoach lines relay station run by an ederly woman that outlived her four husbands sent her son out to a horse rancher with $30.00 to pay him for two horses!!
While searching for a comparison of the value of a dollar in 1850 and today, I found these quotes.

and I think it's fair to say a nickel in 1850 was the equivalent of at least $5.00 today
The price for a good beer at a resturant perhaps?

Another article I found said that in 1880, 80-cents per day was considered a decent wage! Remembering that the work week was six days, that's still only $250 a year. I suspect that's the equivalent of about $25,000 a year today

I maintain in the section above that a dollar in 1850 must be worth at least $100 today. Admittedly, comparisons of wages and prices of 1850 to today's are difficult, at best. The U.S in 1850 was still primarily agrarian, and a significant part of many people's trade was barter; nonetheless, I think my estimate of a 100:1 ratio is far closer to reality.

Here is an inflation calculator which comes up with similar results.
http://www.westegg.com/inflation/

One chart showed the buying power of the dollar in 1978 and compaired it to $0.126 today!! So $200 of todays grocerys would be $25.20 in 1978. I remember mom comming home with four large brown bags of food and commenting/gripping.." $30.00 for four bags of food, that's ridiculus!!!

Yes mom, you were probibly right,

My first job age 16 at Stop & Shop at $1.50 hr. X 49 1/2 hrs was $81.38 or $515.69 today with no raises!!

Pete K.


 

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I always enjoyed watching Gun Smoke while growing up. I liked 'ole Chester Good, especially the episode called "Chesterland" when he buys that piece of worthless ground, strikes water, and his girlfriend runs off with his money. Remember when "Tubby Clyde" stopped by and Chester was trying to level that brokendown shack, and when he tried the whole thing crashed in. Tobby Clyde said "Well there you go....See, I told you it wouldn't work"! VERY FUNNY!!! I have this particular episode on tape and we watch it occassionally. :D

DAVID
 

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Rembrandt said:
Not a big fan of the character "Chester Good" (Dennis Weaver), but "Festus Hagen" (Ken Curtis) was about as funny as they get. Hearing him and Doc (Milburn Stone) go back and forth was the highlight of the show.

...Festus had a mule, can't think what he called it?.....
RUTH :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Gogglerforge.....

Gobblerforge said:
:shakehead
That's right!! Festus had a mule named "Ruth"!! Your a blacksmith and are interested in building a log cabin. These two things alone require you to know that the mule owned by Festus was named Ruth. If you do build a log cabin, it is required that you have a mule and name it "Babe" as in "Babe Ruth".

Gogglerforge, watch "gunsmoke" cause were goin' to ask you questions on it!!

Good luck with the cabin,
Question; What was the blacksmiths name played by Burt Reynolds during the 1963 season? Correct answer wins a set of new horseshoes!!
Guys, This is for Gogglerforge only. No cheatin and tellin him now...
Pete K.
 

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Mule Q

Pete. You know, as a kid growing up I did watch alot of Gunsmoke but can't answer the question. I was a hard core Wild Wild West fan. And I did build a log cabin. We moved in as of last Thanksgiving. I have a 25 yard target from the front porch. If you want a little more useless knowlege, most horse shoeing is done by a trade called a Farrier. They are more vetrinarian than blacksmith. Shoeing horses fall under their responsabilities up to the shoulder. Blacksmiths have a lot more tools and make all other utilitarian items. I know several farriers who are quality smiths but some are not. Most people get this confused because they grew up (as I did) watching old westerns where the man rode up to the livery stable with the big "BLACKSMITH" sign over it. And what was the "SMITH" working on? A horseshoe. Hollywood strove for effect, not accuracy.
One more. If you ever watch the movie "The Edge" with Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin, they find an old hunting cabin in the middle of nowhere. It's run down and is covered with dirt and dust and cobbwebs and has holes in the walls and an inch of dirt "IN" the coffee pot. Baldwins Charecter find an 1886 carbine in "Mint" condition in the dirty corner. **** the luck.
Thanks for watching. Brad
 
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