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Fire liner or not in gun safe?

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With 10 CZ rifles (8 scoped) and 10 other long guns (5 scoped) and 20 handguns, I’m buying new safe.

Question is do I want the fire blanket lining? It would cost $775 more but it’s the loss of space that concerns me.
Interior Dimension Without Fire- 41.6"W 23.1"D 59.6"H
Interior Dimension With Fire- 37"W 19.6"D 52"H

I know house fires happen but my next house will be all electric, no gas or propane and safe would be far from kitchen and garage. Another word I’m no too worried about fire and really want the extra space.
What do you all think ?
Thanks Paul
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Moderator - move if you must.
With 10 CZ rifles (8 scoped) and 10 other long guns (5 scoped) and 20 handguns, I’m buying new safe.

Question is do I want the fire blanket lining? It would cost $775 more but it’s the loss of space that concerns me.
Interior Dimension Without Fire- 41.6"W 23.1"D 59.6"H
Interior Dimension With Fire- 37"W 19.6"D 52"H

I know house fires happen but my next house will be all electric, no gas or propane and safe would be far from kitchen and garage. Another word I’m no too worried about fire and really want the extra space.
What do you all think ?
Thanks Paul
Doesn't matter if you have gas or electric, fires can happen with either.

As for the safe, my only advice is buy the largest you can afford, and don't go by how many guns is says it can hold.... because it will not match what you can comfortably fit in it.

DW
 

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Fire ratings aren't assigned by a single governing agency like Underwriters Labs, as far as I know. At least that was still the case when I bought mine several years ago. That being said, in a fully involved house fire the contents of any regular consumer gun safe WILL BE RUINED. I'd expect to pay $10K or more for a safe with a REAL fire rating. My objective is to defeat or at least make it troublesome for regular thug *** thieves when they try to break the safe open. I buy the thickest metal that I can afford.
 

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UP sir back in the day I went to one of the largest gun shows in my state and they had a Fort Knox safe that was in a house fire. black as all get out on the outside and the inside was fine. That was before fire safes were common. Their claim to fame was their safes are thicker than other brands. If you think about it a safe with thick metal takes a lot longer to heat up. so when i bought my first safe it had 1/4inch body and 3/8" door. My last safe is a Diebold safe which is super thick compared to most other safes out there and I am not worried one bite about a house fire.

Now for you I would suggest not to buy a new safe from a big sporting goods store look on Craig's list, local paper for a big used one, a store closing is where I got my second safe. Most people buy a safe that they think is big enough and then find out after about one year that it was too small. I bought my Diebold from a locksmith for $1000.00 which was a steal. Safes never wear out. You can buy a huge safe for quarters on the dollar if you shop smart.

Most safes these days are made up with 10 guage metal (beer can thickness) and has a fire liner in it that is made up from drywall or has cement in them as far as I know for fire protection. You can tell how thick the metal is by how much the safe weighs. My first safe was 1100 pounds, second is a TL-15 which is 2.144 lbs, my Diebold is about 5000 lbs. Look for a heavy one not some lightweight 500 hundred pounder. Mine even has a "Good Housekeeping Seal of approval on it. Just a suggestion. Good luck on your quest (y)





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Fire ratings aren't assigned by a single governing agency like Underwriters Labs, as far as I know. At least that was still the case when I bought mine several years ago. That being said, in a fully involved house fire the contents of any regular consumer gun safe WILL BE RUINED. I'd expect to pay $10K or more for a safe with a REAL fire rating. My objective is to defeat or at least make it troublesome for regular thug *** thieves when they try to break the safe open. I buy the thickest metal that I can afford.
I agree. My safes are all "fire proof", but my concern is stopping dope heads looking for a quick grab. I have no thoughts that they'll be safe from a house fire. I've seen too many guns ruined in the standard fire proof safes.
 

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Yeah I agree with the statements go with the biggest you can get. The flip side of the coin get the best fire rated safe you can also afford. This is kind of like the what's the best oil and oil filter for your car. It's not that we hear about car engines locking up, self destructing from this or that brand of oil and filter. It's from lack of maintenance like not changing the oil and filter at all.

Like mentioned the three most common threats to your guns. Smash and grab, house fire and locked in a safe in your flooded basement. A few things to add. If you have a house with crawl space reenforce the floor under the safe.
Get something like ADT security system and monitoring on your house. You can get that with fire alarm protection also. Smoke detectors and heat detectors. If you put a safe in a basement think about anything from a busted water line or hurricane rain for several hours or day or so and no power. A few inches of water will be lots of damage. If in a basement there are those water alarms but most use power.

Install a camera system on your house very easy to do on a single story house. Fence in the back yard get a dog or 3 or 4 dogs a doggie door and spoil them. They'll keep a eye on things while you are not home with ADT and cameras don't forget the beware of dog signs.

But I don't think I'd bother buy a safe without any fire protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for you thoughts.
I’m retiring to Ozark Mountains in NW Arkansas leaving Baltimore Md. My budget is $5000 due to the retirement, moving and buying new house.
When with Sturdy Safe co. , Fersno Ca. because they build strong safes without wasting money on cosmetics. Gun Safe | 48W 27D 72H | Model 4827-6 | Sturdy Gun Safe
Large sturdy gun safe model 4227-6
 

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Build a 'fire-room' alcove to house the safe in, maybe with a hidden door? If I was building new.....
An old chest freezer can make a good gun locker too if the seals are good; too energy inefficient to be worth using as a freezer any more but great storage for important paperwork and 'other stuff'.
 

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UP sir back in the day I went to one of the largest gun shows in my state and they had a Fort Knox safe that was in a house fire. black as all get out on the outside and the inside was fine. That was before fire safes were common. Their claim to fame was their safes are thicker than other brands. If you think about it a safe with thick metal takes a lot longer to heat up. so when i bought my first safe it had 1/4inch body and 3/8" door. My last safe is a Diebold safe which is super thick compared to most other safes out there and I am not worried one bite about a house fire.

Now for you I would suggest not to buy a new safe from a big sporting goods store look on Craig's list, local paper for a big used one, a store closing is where I got my second safe. Most people buy a safe that they think is big enough and then find out after about one year that it was too small. I bought my Diebold from a locksmith for $1000.00 which was a steal. Safes never wear out. You can buy a huge safe for quarters on the dollar if you shop smart.

Most safes these days are made up with 10 guage metal (beer can thickness) and has a fire liner in it that is made up from drywall or has cement in them as far as I know for fire protection. You can tell how thick the metal is by how much the safe weighs. My first safe was 1100 pounds, second is a TL-15 which is 2.144 lbs, my Diebold is about 5000 lbs. Look for a heavy one not some lightweight 500 hundred pounder. Mine even has a "Good Housekeeping Seal of approval on it. Just a suggestion. Good luck on your quest (y)





Signalman 🚦
A pawn shop in the area has a safe somewhat similar to this one. I don’t know the fire rating but I do know when they moved it in the store they used a fork lift. Safes are like guns and cars, quality and features are reflected in the price.
 

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Most safes these days are made up with 10 guage metal (beer can thickness) ...
Signalman, pretty sure you're just being sarcastic but for those who are less familiar we should clarify that 10 gauge is actually 1/8" thick steel. 10 gauge is too thick to be cut with hand snips and requires an electric saw or a torch to cut it. If a thief has a reciprocating saw, then it matters little if they're cutting into a 10 gauge, a 1/4" or a 1/2" wall. The saw will make easy work of it.
 

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Doesn't matter if you have gas or electric, fires can happen with either.

As for the safe, my only advice is buy the largest you can afford, and don't go by how many guns is says it can hold.... because it will not match what you can comfortably fit in it.

DW
Sometimes I think safe makers use broom sticks to count how many it can hold.
They sure aren't talking about scoped guns.
 

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In my experience large safes are a PITA and a deterrent from taking guns out to enjoy them. Safe dings are inevitable in them when everything is stacked tight. ( Rule of thumb: If you want to store 20 rifles, get a 40 gun safe) FWIW, I built a "man cave room" room in the basement with concrete walls , wire mesh ceiling liner and a HD steel door. I also installed a sprinkler head in that room. While I only have some HD steel storage cabinets inside, I feel adequately protected. Other than that, my thoughts are that I'm fully insured and likely to have bigger issues to worry about if there ever was a serious house fire. My guess is your $5K could do the same if you have space and similar mindset.
 

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Trailboss sir no I was serious about safe thickness and i will disagree with the length of time it would take using a saw to cut through 1/4 or 1/2inch metal. I cut metal all the time and a 1/8 inch outer shell safe is child's play for a battery powered grinder/cutting tool. Besides if you cut a 1 foot by 2 foot long hole in the side of a safe and the cutting are protected by the sheet rock then knock that out and drill a hole through the inner panel and then use a Sawzall to finish the job. great protection for the thief to steal your valuables. On the other hand, if you tried to cut through one of my safes it would take a hell of a long time being the outside shell of the safe is 1 inch thick. Besides it takes a long time for 1 inch plate to heat up enough to do damage inside and being so heavy they would not be able to just dolly it out the door.


Besides my Diebold was only a $1000 dollars and it's built like a tank why do you think Banks use them to protect money and such against damage. I am just trying to save Uncle Pauly time and money and give him the best safe available.

Signalman 🚦
 

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Trailboss sir no I was serious about safe thickness and i will disagree with the length of time it would take using a saw to cut through 1/4 or 1/2inch metal. I cut metal all the time and a 1/8 inch outer shell safe is child's play for a battery powered grinder/cutting tool. Besides if you cut a 1 foot by 2 foot long hole in the side of a safe and the cutting are protected by the sheet rock then knock that out and drill a hole through the inner panel and then use a Sawzall to finish the job. great protection for the thief to steal your valuables. On the other hand, if you tried to cut through one of my safes it would take a hell of a long time being the outside shell of the safe is 1 inch thick. Besides it takes a long time for 1 inch plate to heat up enough to do damage inside and being so heavy they would not be able to just dolly it out the door.


Besides my Diebold was only a $1000 dollars and it's built like a tank why do you think Banks use them to protect money and such against damage. I am just trying to save Uncle Pauly time and money and give him the best safe available.

Signalman 🚦
I see the 513 area code on the label. That safe was made in my hometown. Hamilton used to be a pretty industrial town with Diebold, Fisher Body, International Paper. Now we have Walmart, Dollar General Stores and over a dozen choices for pizza...
 

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During the Camp Fire about 3 years ago in Paradise, California every fire-resistant gun safe that I know of burned and all of the contents were destroyed/melted. When the fire is burning at 3,500 degrees, nothing that I know of can prevent total destruction.
 
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