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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for at place to get a power custom Titanium trigger, the lowest I have found it is On Target for 48.00 plus 2.50 s&h. Does any one know where I can get it cheaper?
 

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The working theory of a titanium trigger is to sell them to people who like to put a lot of money into a gun just because they can. Therefore thay are priced high. That is their only purpose in life and putting them up for sale cheap defeats the very reason they exist to begin with.

;)

Ron
 

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I've never seen any internal parts on sale on any web site (other than factory parts).
50 bucks is the price I've always seen for titanium triggers.

Just curious, why are you looking for a titanium trigger if price is a concern to you?
A titanium trigger would not be any better than a steel or aluminum one of the same design. If anything it will be more brittle as titanium is more brittle than the other two metals. Weight saving would be almost nothing on a part that small.
The only way I could justify getting a titanium trigger is for show purposes only (as in "let me show you my cool gun with the most expensive parts I can find for it").
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like the design and the lower pull of the power custom titanium trigger and they are the only one that makes. They also do not make it in any other metal. So I have to put out the extra money to get better performance.
So I'm looking to see if I can get a Price brake on it
 

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If you did want to go cheap and you like to do stuff yourself (like most of use around here:) ) then you can get some jb weld and a dremel or files and just shape your own trigger to your likings.
Thats what I would do because I'm poor:(
hehe
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Antlurz
Interesting



Fumbler
Do not think that I could do it your way. I would be better off starting from a small block of metal and filing it to the sape/design wanted and would still be a lot of work.
And I never herd of Titanium being more brittle then steel
If it was brittle that would defeat the purpose of making the extra strong Alloy
 

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Titanium is much more brittle than steel. Steel is one of the most flexable metals if not the most. The term Alloy simply means that a number of metals and or carbon, silicon, and other stuff are mixed together to achieve certain propertys. Just cause it's an Alloy does not mean it's superior all the time. Titanium is very hard and as a general rule the harder a metal is the more brittle it is. Titanium is also not lighter than aluminum it weighs 280 lbs per cubic foot where aluminum weighs 168 lbs per cubic foot. Thats a common misconception with titanuim. I've actually never seen Titanium used in an application where it was needed. I know it's used in nuclear power plants and was once considered a strategic metal. I believe it was developed for atomic misiles. Thats about all I know about titanium. BTW anyone know why a magnesium rifle barrel would not be a good idea? It's not because it's soft either:D
 

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markman
BTW anyone know why a magnesium rifle barrel would not be a good idea? It's not because it's soft either
Would it be because magnesium slowly reacts in the presence of moisture, tarnishing and forming a coating of basic magnesium carbonate, MgCO3ċMg(OH)2?

Or is it that magnesium ignites when heated and burns with an intense white light, and releases large amounts of heat, forming the oxide, magnesia, MgO..... and cannot be extinguished with water, since water reacts with hot magnesium and releases hydrogen?
 

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Yea it ignites at a considerably low temp. Aircraft wheels used to be made of them and sometimes when they landed on carriers tires would blow out and the rims skiding on the deck would ignite it. They had to cut off the wheel and throw it over board or it would burn through the deck. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Markman


If it is so brittle then that blackbird must have fallen apart each time it took off. I do not think so. That's made of mainly titanium. So go back to the books and get the facts.
 

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Titanium has had lots of uses, but in most cases other metals do just as well and are a lot less expensive. Russia, or the former USSR, uses Ti in the production of their submarines, and likely many other war toys. Expensive war toys at that.

Magnesium is fun stuff! Once lit, sand is the only cure.
 

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Bill,
Titanium is generally more brittle than aluminum and steel.
I have seen more titanium lacrosse shafts (6al 4v, similar alloy used in the SR-1) snap than all other materials (aluminum alloys, steel alloys, composites, scandium alloys) combined.
The SR-71 uses titanium only because the other option that can handle the heat was stainless steel (too heavy).
95% of the Ti source used to build the SR-71 was rejected because it was too brittle.
The extreme heat generated by air friction actually helped the Ti withstand the vibrations by annealing it (making it softer for those who don't know the term).
The SR-71 doesn't just take off and pop into mach 3 nor does it handle like an F-16 (because it would fall apart if it did).
Ductility of 6AL 4V titanium is about 14%, the ductility of low carbon steels is around 25%.
You may be confusing "brittleness" with "weakness."
No one here ever said Ti was weak.
You may want to go back to the books and get the facts yourself.
This info comes from a metallurgist friend.
 
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