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Factory "T" Barrel

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Having "Built" two 10/22's from standard carbines and with a little bedding experience, I agreed to see what I could do to improve my buddy's 10/22T which has never been a good shooter.

The very first thing I discovered was that his "T" barrel seems to have an interior bulge or enlarged spot (about midway) where my patch slips by without much friction. This cannot be a good thing and, I'm sure, cannot be corrected. I believe that it must be a manufacturing defect.

Has anyone else seen this in any "T" or aftermarket barrel? Both of my GMs are perfect and outshoot his 10/22T by a good margin. I'm wondering, also, whether Ruger will replace the barrel since it was purchased new in 12/01.

I'm thinking that bedding or any other "tweaking" of this gun will not be meaningful until this barrel is replaced.


Ohcsim
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ledbetter,

So, hammer-forging is a completely different manufacturing method and not just a finish? If so, is it considered to be a generally superior method or a shortcut? Ruger seems to be alone in this as far as I know.

Another thing...I don't have any way to measure this but I think the chamber on his "T" barrel is not as tight. A sample round slips in/out a bit easier than on my GM and seems to have more play. Both barrels were squeeky-clean when I did this so I don't think I'm imagining it.

In any case, I'm going to advise my friend to contact Ruger and request a replacement. It can't hurt to ask and (if the answer is no) it might give him a reason to call Ken at WFM.


Ohcsim
 

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http://www.fulton-armory.com/Barrels.htm

also-

Hammer forged barrels are forged around a mandrill, with grooves cut into the mandrill at the required twist or turn and size of the grooves.

Even today hammer-forged barrels are made from a steel billet with a hole through and a mandrill in the size of the bore and grooves for the required caliber. The billet is rotated and while hammers forge the billet until it fits tightly over the mandrill and is then slowly twisted out by the grooves.

http://sss.sabirifles.co.za/ballistics.htm
 

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One more:

http://hammer.prohosting.com/~primec/description.htm

The technique of hammer forging rifle barrels was developed by Germany before WW2 because the MG42 machine gun, with 1200 rounds per minute rate of fire, positively ate barrels. The first hammer rifling machine was built in Erfurt in 1939. At the end of the war it was shipped down to Austria ahead of the advancing Russian army, where American technicians were able to get a good look at it.

In this process the barrel blank is usually somewhat shorter than the finished barrel. It is drilled and honed to a diameter large enough to allow a Tungsten Carbide mandrel, which has the rifling in high relief on it, to pass down the blank. The blank is then progressively hammered around the mandrel by opposing hammers using a process called rotary forging. The hammered blank is squeezed off the mandrel like tooth paste and finishes up 30% or so longer than it started.
 

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This is my first post! I just got a 10/22T and it is an EXCELLENT gun! It makes really tight groups and it likes CCI Mini Mags. I'm sorry your friend's gun isn't up to par. I think Ruger would be more than happy to replace the barrel. They are a great company to deal with for stuff like that - they stand behind their products 100%. All you've got to do is get in touch with 'em and send it in.

If the barrel has a bulge in it I think it would definitely affect accuracy. I hope you can get the problem corrected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Roger,

Glad to hear you're happy with the "T", and, welcome to RFC. Its the finest forum for anything related to .22 rimfire (and some extracariculars :p ) that exists. The members are tops and the information/help is priceless. Please join the club.


Ohcsim
 

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Thanks for the warm welcome Ohcsim! This is one heck of a great information source. I'm sure to learn a lot from you all.

It's also turned out to be a great source for laughs! I checked out the "Stupid things we've all done in the shop... " thread and had a good hard chuckle. A lot of that stuff sounds EXACTLY like somethin' I'd do...

:D
 
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