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drilling the sear?

1085 Views 22 Replies 12 Participants Last post by  RX7-2nr
has anybody out there drilled the sear in the manner of the power custom sear instead of doing the JB weld trick? :confused: looked at the JB weld trick and have issues about the durability of that modification. i dont ask things that arent metal to be metal if you know what i mean. :1t
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Jb Weld

JB Weld is some wonderful stuff and it has many uses. But I have found that JB Weld is **** hard to adjust. I tried to turn a blob of JB Weld with an allen wrench in order to do some fine adjusting on my trigger for sear slop. It didn't work. The blob of JB Weld just sat there like a blob of JB Weld. So I tried again. No good. Finally I realized that JB Weld is glue. It doesn't adjust. It's intended for sticking to objects together. Using JB Weld to fix trigger slop is like fixing a broken car window with plastic sheeting and duct tape. It works, but don't try to roll it down.
 

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Squawsach is correct,

I couldn't adjust the JB Weld I had either.

If you are a "Do It the Self" kinda' person.....then.........................

Drill the sear... And the trigger shoe while your at it, to get to the set screw and you will be very happy.
I'm an idiot, and had to buy the Power Custom hammer and adjustable sear before I drilled and tapped my factory parts. Wish I would have saved my money for my next build.

While your at it, do the hammer set screw trick, replace the three pins and shim everything up to elliminate the slop. Ohh yea, stiffen' up the springs too. You won't be sorry.

Squawsach and Skeeter27red gave me the help and confidence I needed to turn average trigger guards into AWESOME trigger guards. Thanks fellas'.

Do some searches and you will have all the knowledge you need that this dummy used to get good results.

hfly
 

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what do you mean "turn". do you mean turn like an allen head setscrew? if so, sanding the JB weld produces the same effect, unless you sand too much, which is your own fault because you didnt go slow enough and check the fit often.
 

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Yep! Turn.......Screw...... Back-in..

Back-out, all da' same to me... sand tooooo much of the JB weld and you need to start over to get maxium results. Turn toooo much, and simply turn back or back out some. It takes a matter of seconds. Really, it's JMHO and I am nothing close to an expert in this field. As a matter of fact, I'm really a newbie. I just got started this past winter due to my better-half getting ill and having to be homebound. SOOOOOOOOOOO, if I can do it, I'm sure that most anyone can.

hfly
 

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Yeah that

After figuring out the adjustable sear with the access hole in the trigger, I would never do another J-B sear ever again, nope, not me, no way, no how! Sawdust and Squasatch have it "goin' on". :t
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
sear adjustment

that is correct jb weld is glue. weld is right there in the name as in weld two pieces of metal toghether and i dont want to weld my sear and disconecter toghether and be fore you guys get all huffy about using paste wax as a release agent. i still have a 700 rem with 2 coats of release agent that is solidly glued into the stock. it usually shoots 40gr v-max into 1/4" 5shot groups at 100yds if the nut at the bolt does his job. :D so i dont have the heart to rip it out of the stock just yet.
p.s. to you jb weld guys putting a trigger group together and tearing it appart 25 times just to check the "adjustment of the jb weld" with all the shims in there just aint no fun in fact im putting off drilling my sear for as long as i can stand ;) ill probably do it this weekend :D
 

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JB weld is relatively quick , easy and it works great, but adjustment is non existant. The set screw is the best way to go IMHO, BUT for most home DIY'ers it is darn near impossible to drill the sear. I tried it a couple of times and won't bother with it again unless I get some heavy duty machinery and tooling.
I tried to anneal the part first. I didn't have much luck using a propane torch.
I tried using the BIG milling machine at work but it wouldn't accept a small enough bit.
I tried using a hand drill and titanium drill bits with cutting fluid. I broke 1 drill bit. I drilled the hole off center but finally got it drilled.
Then came tapping troubles. Broken taps are no fun to remove, but I finally get it threaded and working after spending about 3 hours on it.
I did all of this at work in my spare time so in a round about way the company paid me approx $33 to make a POS adjustable sear.
Since then, I've just bought PC's adjustable sears and will be getting a few from Skeeter in the near future at a better price.

I'm not a newbie when it come to working with tools. I built my own home (with help from family) I do most of my automobile maintaince. And I fix stuff around the house. But hardened metal takes special tooling and special precautions. It's just not worth my time nor trouble..............even though the company I work for paid me to do it. (although 'they' arn't aware of that, hehe) For others like me................use jb weld or buy one already finished.

Auto bolt releases and extended mag releases are a different story. DIY It IS quick and easy, even for a greenhorn.

JMHO and experience,
swampf0x
 

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Try MAPP gas for annealing and rehardening. The Mapp gas, same type cylinder as the Propane only it is yellow and says MAPP GAS on it, is hotter and therefore will bring the part to temperature faster. In fact we use two torches focused on the part. We have used propane and gotten the job done also, just takes a little longer. When you heat the sear bring it to a cherry red, a glowing cherry red, and let it cool slowly. We bury it in a bucket of sand to slow the cooling process and in about 10 min. it will drill easier than cold rolled. To reharden, heat it a little past the cherry red to almost a straw color and then immediately quench in water. Leave the set screw in place during the rehardening and it gets hardened too. Clean up the critical surfaces, put a little Loc-Tite on the set screw and you're done. This whole process takes less than 20 min. and that includes cooling the part during annealing. No special drill bits or taps required and to date no breakage. Finish off the project by drilling a hole in the trigger to access the set screw for adjustment with the gun fully assembled. Squawsach did one of these the other day in about the time it takes to prepare the sear, find your JB Weld and mix it up. Before the JB Weld is even starting to cure he had the sear complete, in the gun and adjusted and ready to shoot. I'm not knocking the JB Weld trick, just saying that a set screw adjustment in the sear is quicker and easier to accomplish and a more positive adjustment. The annealing and rehardening doesn't have to be an ordeal if you just follow the above steps, it's really quite simple. Any way, it works for us.

Good luck

sawdust
 

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SwampF0X said:
...for most home DIY'ers it is darn near impossible to drill the sear. I tried it a couple of times and won't bother with it again unless I get some heavy duty machinery and tooling.
I tried to anneal the part first. I didn't have much luck using a propane torch.
I tried using the BIG milling machine at work but it wouldn't accept a small enough bit.
I tried using a hand drill and titanium drill bits with cutting fluid. I broke 1 drill bit. I drilled the hole off center but finally got it drilled.
exactly why i didnt drill the sear. clamping the sear and putting it in a drill press may work, but i have no drill press. i have a hand drill and a dremel. neither of which i was going to try to drill a prefectly straight 1/8" or so hole into a tiny piece of metal.

drilling it does give a more professional result, but i dont have the equipment to do it. the JB weld worked perfectly and cost me about nothing at all.
 

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I would definately install a set screw in my sear, but I don't have torch or drill press, or even a vise. So i just gotta do the jbweld. u gotta go slow with the Jb. When you guys have the sear adjusted the way u want it(no creep) does it feel like there is extra tension between the disconect and sear?
 

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How to Drill Hard Metal...

Guys, been reading a lot here on the forums for a few days now. Thought I might make my first post here, maybe even help you drill the sear.

Money and more importantly the lack of; always gets in the way of things around my house LOL. One way to drill hard surfaced metal such as the sear, there is a way to drill this with a limit of tools and or money.

You need a small center punch to do this and the drill bit of the right size for the hole you need. I would also drill the hole 1/64th inch larger than the size called for the tap size your going to use too.

Now more on this center punch, it needs to be one with a three sided point on it. Not like most you see with a smooth coined shape ground onto them. The triangle shaped center punch really helps.

Take our punch and score the area to be drilled, use the drill and your only going to be able to drill the area you roughed up with the center punch, drill longer on this and your trying to polish a hole in the sear LOL... Polishing a hole is not the way

Soon as you hit the area with the drill and its cut out the score of the punch and smoothed the bottom of the beginning hole, stop drilling and re-score with the punch again. You will go at this over and over till you get through the hardened surface metal.

Its all in scoring the area to be drilled over and over, remove the roughed up surface and re-score again till you get into the softer metal. Hope this might help get through the sear and on with your project. Great forum here on the rimfires we all love too. Thanks for letting me burn off some of the paper here...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
success!

anealed the part with mapp gas torch to cherry red and let cool. no sand as i dont have a sand box. after the part cooled drilled it with hss drill and some rem oil for lube and vise grips for holding the part. drilled no problem. then tapped it with 6-32 tap with same rem oil for lube. polished the burrs off the hole installed the set screw and checked for fit then drilled the trigger for adjustment hole. then reheated the whole part to a straw color then quenched it in cold water. after the part was cool again i polished the scale off and reinstalled the trigger with perfect results. i used vise grips,rem oil, cordless drill, mapp gas torch, cheap drill bits and taps and didnt have any problems. no drill press no milling machine no vise just patience and a small amount of skill and a large lack of funds. :t
 
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