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I have a few 22 lr rifles with different barrels 16.6 18 and 24 .
Do I gain with longer or shorter when off the bench .
I shoot with scopes .
Thinning out the heard
 

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No need for super long barrels in rimfire for long range matches like PRS/NRL. I use an 18" and shoot it to over 500 yards. 400 yards in matches is regular and it works fine.
 

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Keep whichever barrel shoots best regardless of length. After 16" it all comes down to how the barrel was machined. The only affect barrel length has on accuracy is you'll be closer to the target by a few inches with a longer barrel vs a shorter one. So no, it doesn't make a difference.
 

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Everything I’ve read says it does, mostly because a shorter barrel produces a higher velocity. A faster bullet is more affected by wind.
I shot 16 6x5 targets this summer with three different guns at 300 yards, not enough examples to mean anything, but FWIW (not much) the 24” barrel performed the best.
My new 16” CZ just had a good showing in a 50 yard match in moderate wind. It surprised me. I can’t wait to try it out at 300 yards.

I just had a thought though. The best performing Ammo at 300 yards through my other rifles is the faster SK Longrange and SK BiathlonSport. It easily outperforms lot tested CenterX which falls apart after 200 yards. Will the Center X improve at 300 yards through a shorter barrel because of the increased velocity?
 

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I agree with the longer barrel iron sighted comments. I shoot in the 25 yard match and everyone seems to be shooting long barrels (better.sight radius). My CZ 457 Jaguar has a 28.6 in barrel and it is just awesome. On a calm day when everthing is working it will shoot very well at 100 too.

That said..the bullet DOES stay in the barrel for a fraction of a second longer so any movement could have an effect down range
 

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That said..the bullet DOES stay in the barrel for a fraction of a second longer so any movement could have an effect down range
Long barreled rimfire rifles have been used with great success by many shooters. It's very possible that when someone experiences some kind of movement that affects results downrange, the length of the barrel shouldn't be the first concern.
 

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Keep whichever barrel shoots best regardless of length. After 16" it all comes down to how the barrel was machined. The only affect barrel length has on accuracy is you'll be closer to the target by a few inches with a longer barrel vs a shorter one. So no, it doesn't make a difference.
Indeed, or it doesn't make THE difference.

This reminds me of the evergreen debate about whether SV or HV is more accurate. The answer is that the more accurate ammunition will be more accurate which you won't know until you try it.

Put differently, there may be marginal differences in velocity with different barrel lengths, but those differences as they influence accuracy will be swamped by the other qualities of the barrel.

That the differences in velocity as barrel length changes may seem counter intuitive, but TheAccurateShooter testing in which a barrel is reduced in length an inch at a time is illustrative. The result with SK Standard was:

SK STANDARD
24.75 INCH BARREL 1028 FPS
23.75 1033 FPS
22.75 1042 FPS
21.75 1059 FPS
20.75 1051 fps
19.75 1062 fps
18.75 1042 fps
17.75 1053 fps
16.75 1049 fps
15.75 1057 fps
14.50 1059 fps
13.50 1049 FPS
12.50 1059 FPS
11.50 1046 FPS
10.00 1036 FPS

6" TROOPER 929 FPS

http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/8711043/m/4871072832/p/2

There is one variable that correlates with length directly -- stiffness. A barrel of a given diameter and length will be eight times stiffer than another barrel of that same diameter but twice the length. Even that itself doesn't mean that the stiffer barrel will be the better shooter.
 

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That said..the bullet DOES stay in the barrel for a fraction of a second longer so any movement could have an effect down range
Long barreled rimfire rifles have been used with great success by many shooters. It's very possible that when someone experiences some kind of movement that affects results downrange, the length of the barrel shouldn't be the first concern.
Who said it should be the first concern? Not me.
I am just stating the obvious..if you have any barrel movement after/at time of trigger pull and the bullet stay in the barrel a bit longer...
 

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Everything I've read says it does, mostly because a shorter barrel produces a higher velocity. A faster bullet is more affected by wind.
I shot 16 6x5 targets this summer with three different guns at 300 yards, not enough examples to mean anything, but FWIW (not much) the 24" barrel performed the best.
My new 16" CZ just had a good showing in a 50 yard match in moderate wind. It surprised me. I can't wait to try it out at 300 yards.

I just had a thought though. The best performing Ammo at 300 yards through my other rifles is the faster SK Longrange and SK BiathlonSport. It easily outperforms lot tested CenterX which falls apart after 200 yards. Will the Center X improve at 300 yards through a shorter barrel because of the increased velocity?
A faster bullet is less effected by wind as it has less time of flight. I think what you are thinking is going transonic from supersonic which can get squirrely in some loads but using subsonic ammo in shorter barrels handles that just fine.

Also center X falling apart is not about velocity but how it is in your rifle. I shoot center X to 400 yards in matches and it holds together great in an 18" barrel. A lot of people shoot it in long range matches. Comes down to what your rifle likes.
 

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In the .22LR speeds, that isn't true. A round at 1050 will deflect at 100 yards .32 inches in a 1 MPH wind. The exact same round at 1250 FPS will deflect .47 inches in a one MPH wind. That's if the BC is exactly the same. But high Velocity ammo has bullets that are a lower BC so the deflection is actually even greater.

A good explanation of wind deflection in a .22 is here
Will take a look but I keep everything subsonic anyways so really doesn't effect me much. That's from an 18" also.
 

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Everything I've read says it does, mostly because a shorter barrel produces a higher velocity. A faster bullet is more affected by wind.
I shot 16 6x5 targets this summer with three different guns at 300 yards, not enough examples to mean anything, but FWIW (not much) the 24" barrel performed the best.
My new 16" CZ just had a good showing in a 50 yard match in moderate wind. It surprised me. I can't wait to try it out at 300 yards.

I just had a thought though. The best performing Ammo at 300 yards through my other rifles is the faster SK Longrange and SK BiathlonSport. It easily outperforms lot tested CenterX which falls apart after 200 yards. Will the Center X improve at 300 yards through a shorter barrel because of the increased velocity?
A faster bullet is less effected by wind as it has less time of flight. I think what you are thinking is going transonic from supersonic which can get squirrely in some loads but using subsonic ammo in shorter barrels handles that just fine.

Also center X falling apart is not about velocity but how it is in your rifle. I shoot center X to 400 yards in matches and it holds together great in an 18" barrel. A lot of people shoot it in long range matches. Comes down to what your rifle likes.
It's not just one rifle that I have experienced this with, but three. CenterX outperforms in all three out to 200 yards, but sucks at 300 yards. With CenterX at 300 yards I get what I call "droppers" . Three or four rounds will be in a smaller group, but one or sometimes two rounds drop as much as 10" below the rest of the group. This is with testing center lot tested Ammo for the specific rifle. This doesn't happen with the faster rounds.
I was telling Luke at the testing center about it. He said he had heard this from several people. I won't pretend to understand the "why", but this is what I have experienced.

I would like to hear Topstrap's take on this as he and his friends shoot a lot of 22ELR.
 

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Comes down to what your rifle likes.


Yep, but has nothing to do with brand and everything to do with cartridge quality.
No rifle can fix mv caused vertical spread and no rifle can repair factory damaged cartridges.
When those bullets are visibly beat up, drive bands aren't uniform from bullet to bullet,
bullet material is compressed down onto the brass and you can hear the difference in muzzle reports
don't expect consistent trajectories....it won't happen. :(

As for the effects of supersonic transition, you can ignore them with almost all 22lr.
Results at 50, 100 and 200 yards show the transition has almost no effect on accuracy.
Cartridge quality and wind are responsible for anything not rifle or shooter caused.
 

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I don't know.
I don't know it with specificity either, but the answer is necessarily "some".

What any of us can do with a rifle of given weight and length will have little to do with the mechanical accuracy of the rifle and a lot to do with how comfortably and steadily we can hold it. We are the significant variable and can be hard to figure out.

I've seen the inertia of a long barrel work to allow really poor form to still result in good standing accuracy. I had a rifle with a 27.5 heavy barrel several decades ago. The movement of the muzzle was so slow that I could do exactly what one shouldn't do, time the shot for the crosshairs passing the target.

In addition to the advantage of sight radius, I'd suggest that length and weight in themselves can allow us to shoot more accurately.
 

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I don't know.
I don't know it with specificity either, but the answer is necessarily "some".

What any of us can do with a rifle of given weight and length will have little to do with the mechanical accuracy of the rifle and a lot to do with how comfortably and steadily we can hold it. We are the significant variable and can be hard to figure out.

I've seen the inertia of a long barrel work to allow really poor form to still result in good standing accuracy. I had a rifle with a 27.5 heavy barrel several decades ago. The movement of the muzzle was so slow that I could do exactly what one shouldn't do, time the shot for the crosshairs passing the target.

In addition to the advantage of sight radius, I'd suggest that length and weight in themselves can allow us to shoot more accurately.
Very good points. Agreed.

Variables:

Known
Unknown
Known unknowns
Unknown unknowns

Head spins
 

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Who said it should be the first concern? Not me.
I am just stating the obvious..if you have any barrel movement after/at time of trigger pull and the bullet stay in the barrel a bit longer...
If you read carefully, no one said that about you.

The point is quite simply that since long barrels can shoot very well, when a shooter has barrel movement that causes issues downrange, the problem is unrelated to barrel length. Using a shorter barrel only masks the problem because the cause of the unnecessary movement is still there and not fixed by using a different barrel.
 

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I prefer longer barrels for their looks alone but don't hate short barrels
Have a 16.25" on my Ruger custom shop 10/22, a 24" on my Chacon, and have a 26" barrel ordered for my Vudoo if it ever arrives.

Nick's reply was the best so far, jmo.
 

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Using a shorter barrel only masks the problem because the cause of the unnecessary movement is still there and not fixed by using a different barrel.
I was curious to see what a short barreled rifle would do, so I built one. My first results shooting offhand were very rough. I concluded that I had used the weight of longer barrels to mask some bad habits.

If someone standing on a podium tells me he needs a short barrel and long blooptube to get there, I'll believe him. For most of us, the time between ignition and the bullet leaving the rifle is a conceptual variable more than a practical one.
 
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