Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner

Do rings matter?

4000 81
Hello all,

I just purchased a new savage mkII and it came with an ok weaver 3x9 scope. I have already purchased a new scope but am currently looking at rings. My questions is how much do the rings matter in terms of quality when used for a .22 for general plinking and groups between 50 and 100 yards?
21 - 40 of 82 Posts

Registered
Joined
2,777 Posts
馃槀 馃槀 馃槀 But lapping tools are cool. What's not to like about a few steel bars? But you need a differenc set for each diameter scope tube. And once you invest in the tool, why not lap every set of rings you install? Just to amortize the investment. I know mine's sitting on the shelf awaiting it's next chance -- which may never come. Oh, well, my son will end up with it.


There's also a pretty lengthy history of using various sorts of non-metallic strips inside rings (I recall some cases of that stuff actually coming with the rings) to ensure a higher degree of conformity and friction between ring and scope, along with careful directions on how to use it. I think that different schools of thought evolved on how best to secure a scope in rings -- along with a bunch of horror stories about scopes being ruined by doing things wrong in one way or another. Along with a dose of "Since things can be done this way, they should be done this way. It is the way."

And NOBODY wants to ruin a nice scope. :(
I can't argue with your last point!
 

Premium Member
Joined
78 Posts
I've noticed that the practice of lapping is usually recommended the most by people who sell lapping tools. Obviously Burris Signature rings, with their plastic inserts, can't benefit from lapping, and frankly none others I've used over the decades have ever needed it either - so far as I can tell, anyway. But if I ever have any doubts then I guess I'll be in the market for a lapping tool. They cost a lot less than a good scope.

This
 

Registered
Joined
2,276 Posts
After nearly four decades of firearm purchases, scope swapping, and general dickering and dealing, I have a impressive stash of rings in a box in the gun room. Some of which have failed but I hang on to them for parts.

After having reviewed many failures from use and from repeatedly installing and removing scopes, I have developed a good eye for quality rings independent of price. Unfortunately, suppliers often change manufacturers so the rings you got last year that were awesome may be worthless today.

First off, make sure the screws are long enough. I have returned many rings that only have two threads holding them either on the scope or the base.

Secondly, make sure there is a good gap between the top of the ring and the base of the ring to get a good grip on the scope. If you tighten the screws down and they bottom out, it will not have a good purchase on the scope tube.

Thirdly, take a look at the cross bolt on the mounting system. Many times there is not enough "Meat" to hold the head of the allen screw and that will fail, even when using a torque wrench to tighten them.

Forth, there are a number of rings out there that have the bolt coming up through the flat blade screw nut, forcing you to use a bucktooth screwdriver to straddle the bolt. I have made a number of buck tooth screwdrivers but never seam to have one when and where I need it.

I despise turn in rings. I never get them dead nutz without some adjustments, and I am sure that repeated removal and replacement will wear them out. Why bother?

I have been pleasantly surprised with Weaver 6 screw rings. I like the 1/2 inch nut to tighten them although I am concerned that the head of the screw does not have that much meat to sustain repeated over tightening of the rings. Have not had a problem yet and I have a number of rings on rifles that I have assembled with the goal of easily switching scopes depending on use. Have not yet experienced a failure.

I do not like the rings with a insert that if you align them correctly you can get 20 moa or so additional elevation. Have used them and had them slip on my 7 mm remington magnum. Torqued to spec, and 7 mm remington is not a super heavy hitter. Get a 20 MOA base if you need it.

Also do not like the spring clip rings with screws on one side. They usually have a nut that needs a buck tooth flat blade screw driver and I am sure that they work great but they are just ugly.

Have not had the need to lap a set of rings for my scope. Have had to dremel a set of rings to fit a 26 millimeter Pecar Berlin scope but it turned out just fine. Used winchester 1 inch 6 screw rings and I am changing that scope out frequently with a leupold and it is holding up fine.

Got a Arken scope on the way with Arken rings included in the purchase. On line they look fine but we shall see.

Regards,
Crankster
 

Registered
Joined
358 Posts
They matter. Some cheap cast rings have a depression on the bearing surface and can mark the scope, Some cheap rings will not be in alignment. Some cheap rings will not hold well. Some cheap rings look cheap.
I prefer Burris signature ring which cost a little more, but eliminate almost every ring problem. It doesn鈥檛 make sense to me to study what rifle and scope are best suited for what you want to do, and then put little or no thought into what base or rings you want to hold it all together.
I agree with the comment concerning Burris Rings, however you must specify Burris Signature Zee Rings if you want the inserts.The plain Signature Rings don鈥檛 utilize the inserts.
There has been a comment concerning the inserts slipping on a 7mm Remington Magnum, the Burris Rings and Inserts
are covered with oil which must be wiped dry before mounting.
I have been using the Burris Insert Rings on all my rifles since they were first marketed with no issues whatsoever.
If you collimate your scopes and use insert rings you can do no better.
Collimating scopes can easily be achieved, but the method I use is for another day, I intend to post the method on RFC
next year.
Happy Trails,
Fritz
 

Registered
Joined
227 Posts
Though I have bought and used some middle of the road priced rings I normally go with what has always worked for me and that's the cheaper rings. I've mounted many scopes and ring setups over the years on both centerfire and rimfire rifles and I've never had a single issue that was due to the rings. As long as proper clearances are met and the rings are installed correctly there's no issues. Any manufacturer can have a bad run or a bad product on occasion but that's along with anything else you buy. And I think many issues stem from over torquing than anything else. Leading to issues with the scope itself. I've read on different forums where an individual has gotten a bad scope where the internals were messed up so they returned it. Got a different scope, had the internals messed up on it, then tried a third one only to have problems again. I know it's possible to get a bad scope on occasion from any major manufacturer but two or three in a row? Seems more likely to me that there might be some operator error involved.
Something else I've wondered about is the factory supplied base or rails that are sometimes included with a rifle. I've read a million times over how the first thing you should do is trash the factory base and go buy a new $50-$100 base or rail that's more durable. One particular example that stands out is the remington 597 base. I might be missing something but I've yet to have an issue with either of mine. No problems with other factory bases either. Take it off, clean it, and add a tad bit of thread locker then snug it down. As long as the screws are drilled straight I don't know how one can be alot better than the other.
 

Premium Member
Joined
12,009 Posts
Im partial to steel rings. With steel screws. With slots. The hex head aluminum screws are the worst. They bugger easily. The torx steel screws bugger the bit.
But I buy Aluminum rings too,
The Monstrum Rings are decent, these are good too https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0936FM55L/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1or these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077LJY9NG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The rings EGW sells for 34 mm are good , and the CZ rings are excellent.
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,074 Posts
Aesthetics.

Tactical rifles need big oversize rings with at least 6 screws holding the cap on so no one will doubt your tactical prowess.

Nice rifles get sleek trim rings, often steel, with no more than two screws holding the cap on.

These Burris Extreme rings came with a scope I bought and I'm too lame to use them.

Somebody with a VooDoo and tattoos needs them...Tom

Automotive tire Bumper Rim Automotive exterior Auto part
 

Registered
CZ455
Joined
468 Posts
The big problem with those rings (which appear to spring from the old Soviet School of Elegant Design) is that they take up so much space on the scope that it may be difficult (or impossible) to adjust it for the correct eye relief. The Monstrum rings on my CZ 455 with the Argos scope are like that. I can just barely position it far enough back to get the eye relief I need. But I am confident that I'm fully prepared for any tactical challenge I may encounter on the range.

What I really don't like about the ones pictured here is the giant industrial size Stalinist hex nut hanging off the side. I mean ... that's really going too far. At least my Monstrum rings are missing that "feature." 馃檮
 

Registered
Joined
2,777 Posts
I agree with the comment concerning Burris Rings, however you must specify Burris Signature Zee Rings if you want the inserts.The plain Signature Rings don鈥檛 utilize the inserts.
There has been a comment concerning the inserts slipping on a 7mm Remington Magnum, the Burris Rings and Inserts
are covered with oil which must be wiped dry before mounting.
I have been using the Burris Insert Rings on all my rifles since they were first marketed with no issues whatsoever.
If you collimate your scopes and use insert rings you can do no better.
Collimating scopes can easily be achieved, but the method I use is for another day, I intend to post the method on RFC
next year.
Happy Trails,
Fritz
I'm afraid you're mistaken about Burris Sig. rings. The Signature Zee rings fit Weaver/Picatinny bases, the Signature rings fit grooved receivers and the Standard Sigs. fit screw-mounted "standard" bases. I've used all 3 types for many years. All Signature rings use the plastic bases.
 

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
I just use the $10 weaver rings at walmart :eek: Never had an issue. I don't lap them either. O well...i'm cheeeep

^^^^^ I'm not sure why it says that but its a link to walmart weaver rings for $9.88
I have some of those cheap ones, their Quad Locks for a couple bucks more are better. My only complaint about Weaver is that they seem to be one size down from everyone else. Ie their Medium (typically found in store) is too low for a 32mm scope. Their High is more like others Medium.
 

Registered
Joined
623 Posts
Aesthetics.

Tactical rifles need big oversize rings with at least 6 screws holding the cap on so no one will doubt your tactical prowess.

Nice rifles get sleek trim rings, often steel, with no more than two screws holding the cap on.

These Burris Extreme rings came with a scope I bought and I'm too lame to use them.

Somebody with a VooDoo and tattoos needs them...Tom

View attachment 346366
I bought a set of those and never did work up the ballz to use them. And the huge "Stalinist hex nut hanging off the side " (thanks @711b) only made them worse for me. Honestly, it is disappointing that Burris put their name on them.
 
21 - 40 of 82 Posts
Top