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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well the local dealer got two of these in last monday, so's I took a critical look in the safe and parted with a toy I didn't use. Went in yesterday and picked her up, then got tied up with life and wasn't able to get to my tear down till later in the day when I was in poor spirits.
That turned out to be good luck cause this little gem put a grin on my face, yeppers!
First, a lil clarity: The 511 is the CZ autoloader with a one piece stock, and is currently chambered in .22lr only. The two piece stock model you may see around is the BRNO 611 and is chambered in .22Mag only (at this time). Since I heard BRNO went under last Tuesday, I guess prices will soar on these rifles.
Now back to the subject at hand. I thumbed threw the manual to check for any particulars on disassembly, and something caught my eye: They mention there being only two models (Standard with flat finish and uncheckered hardwood stock, Lux with checkered walnut stock), yet a paragraph later they mention a subsonic model??? The pics also show a threaded muzzle with knurled cap.
Ok, so, mine has a front sight which appears identical to that on the sight equiped bolt models. Its adjustable for elevation and equipped with a set screw to retain adjustment. The front sight has a sun roof, dunno why?
This sight assembly appears to be made on a tube, which is then mated over a turned down portion of the barrel, don't know how its retained but they took some time polishing to blend it in.
The rear in adjustable for windage by drifting in its dovetail, and is a flip type 90 degree block whick is calibrated to 50 and 100 meters.
The receiver is quite short, and polished well with darn few tool marks visible. The dovetail on top has a small slot on one side at the rear, guess for an aperature sight. Just for giggles I threw on a Browning T-bolt peep but unfortunately its too blessed tall to sight in (sigh).
Dry firing with the bolt slightly retracted revealed she's hammer fired, and my guestimated pull weight is between 4.75 and 6 lbs (my highest accurate guage only goes to 4 lbs.) The trigger is two stage with secondary travel of about 3/32"(measured at the tip) indicating loads of sear engagement.
The manual describes disassembly in interesting detail, with descriptions of where your hands and fingers are to be (but without pics its about as complicated as writing how to tie your shoes ;) ).
First, start with an unloaded rifle!
Essentially, unscrew the slotted thumb screw on the left rear of the receiver, it will slide out only about 1/4". Then carefully, and with great control, pivot the receiver/trigger group upwards into the stocks inletting till you see the forward part of the bolt assembly (big square steel assembly under the barrel) just clear the top inletting. Then slide the metalwork forward about a 1/4" till the hook at the forend tip clears its retainer. The whole metal work then comes upwards clear of the inletting.
Wow, theres assembly methods from all the best manufacturers out there! The trigger group is a subassembly ala 10/22, but retained by a push button release. The housing is made the same way Ruger makes the MkII gripframe (folded and welded, polished). The bolt assembly reminds me of some of the 10/22-.22mag conversions I saw in the early '80s, or the telescoping bolt from a Mac 11. There is the section in the receiver, which runs on a single roller bearing, and then a lot of mass under and forward of the receiver, which rides a track machined in the bottom of the barrel. A large spring guide allows lots of bolt control/alignment, and should be quite easy to add a buffer if needed.
I was as impressed with the quality and execution of this design as when I first disassembled the bolt from a 452, I just stood there and shook my head in amazement. Tolerances are TIGHT, and I can understand where some have described it having a rough feel when cycling, thers a lot of protectant to be cleaned!
I disassembled and soaked the whole metalwork with combustion chamber cleaner. Trust me, everyone has mentioned the "brown" coming from the bore? Its all over the outside too, and takes a bit of repeated soaking and wiping to remove. I then coated all metal bearing surfaces with a mix of Corrosion-X and Moly paste. I went into this initial cleaning expecting to find a burr or two, nope, all clean and smooth.
The stock is finished to a semi gloss with pores nearly filled to the surface, the hand checkering is uh, less than perfect, but functional. One of the most striking things about this rifles construction, is the utter lack of plastic in its functional parts. The buttplate is it. The balance is blued steel and walnut!
When in the shop, I thought the rifle appeared smallish, guess its due to the receiver being so short, yet in the hands she is lively and fast pointing, the sight picture clear and crisp.
Can't forget the sling swivels which came on this stock, an eyepleasing affair, its interesting that their design prevents them from slapping the stock and marring the finish. While not quick/disconnect, they are of a style that suits this rifle.
The proofs in the shooting folks, and I'm dying to get to the club. I'll be documenting all rounds fired, as my intention is to use this rifle in CMP rimfire sporter rifle competition. The included test target shows 3 rounds in a perfect triangle, slightly high and right of center, and only 3/8" CTC.
Range report to follow.
Take care,
warren
Edited to add:
Forgot to mention, the stock is completely finished(even the inletting), the checkering was apparently cut prior to finishing (unlike the 452's I've owned).
There is a steel retaining block attached through the pistol grip area that is what the receiver ends up attached to with the cross bolt when assembled.
The forend hook on the bottom of the barrel engages an adjustable steel tongue inletted into the forend tip. This means the gun won't be able to "shoot loose" and may prove a means to "tune" barrel/action harmonics.

Good grief, I keep thinking of more stuff to add:
The magazine is completely different from anything else I've seen. Straight stack, all steel (yeah even the follower) and appears to be a quality unit. It has a similar width to the Zom 451's, much shorter front to rear than a Cz452.
Also, for folks like me who disliked the trigger and bottom metal on the 452, the 511 hold a work of art, serrated trigger face and what appears to be all machined steel guard! The crossbolt safety is intuitive, easy, and quite positive, very similar feel to the Ruger 10/22.


Ahhh, yet a bit more to add.
The extractor on this little jewell is gonna surprise ya, think Colt 1911! She's tuned, the tip is shaped for performance! The lead edge is curved to allow the case to slide up past it, then the face is reversed to retain the case rim.
The chamber does not engrave, but is quite snug in diameter. The firing pin protrusion is nearly exactly to the face of the bolt, its tip is well shaped and strikes the case heads in the same place each time (no BB trick needed here ;) ).
Sadly, there is no provision for a bolt hold-open, not something you'd expect if you grew up without 'em, but in competition shooting its an added perk (for safety). It also makes cleaning a bit easier, but is just a little inconvenience.
 

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Warren : your observation about the front sight is correct. The ramp is mounted on a tube. The muzzle is turned down to accept this tube, then polished until they blend together.

The slot on the left rear of the scope rail is for anchoring the mount. The bolt gun around '70 has this same rail.

As I recall, what we did to pivot the metal parts up was to give the trigger guard a karate chop upward - not much control there :)

About tightness, for the one sample I played with, I couldn't push the mag. in without squeezing the mag release lever. The catch was too square on the bottom. Also, once the mag was in place, the bolt must be retracted before I could push the release lever to get the mag out. I guess these things would go away with a little use.

How would you like a .22 semi-auto rifle that's all steel and walnut (except for that butt plate), that can be disassembled without tool ? That's what the 511 is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ah Claude, that'd mean I'd have to sell toy to purchase a digicam (sigh) not in the cards at the moment. I am trying to bum one off my friends though ;)

Chunckchucker,
the asking price was $395.00, not cheep, but if it shoots as good as its made, I'll be darn happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Someone was kind enough to upload the entire owners manual:
CZ 511 Manual
Down at the bottom are pics of rifle assembled and field stripped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Function test:
Got tied up working on the wife's car, since I'm automotively challenged it took all blessed day :(
Finally made it to the club at 5pm, with the newly assembled Anschutz 54, T/C Contender (16" match), 1976 Ruger 10/22, and the CZ 511. All but the Annie were iron sighted, so's this was more to make sure everything went bang, rather than whether it had gilt edge accuracy.
The CZ 511 was tested with a variety of ammo in the following order:
Wolf MT
PMC Target
Aguila Pistol Match
Federal Champion Hi-Vel.
Federal American Eagle
Aguila SE Subsonic hollowpoint
Dynapoints
Had my first 3 malfunctions on the 3 or fourth mag full of Aguila Subsonics, failure to eject. When I switched to the Dynapoints, I was shocked that I couldn't get through the mag without failures, coarse by then she'd seen around 150/200 rounds with only swabbing the bore between makes of ammo.
Disassembled, the action was pretty gummed up, but this little trip did show me a few things. There was a very small shiney place, where the bolts forward spring guide glides past the front edge of the trigger housing, no biggie.
The magazine, heck the whole action is gonna take some attention to slight smoothing of most anything which contacts the cartridge (basically I'm gonna polish surfaces that would smooth over the years anyway) cause as of now she's a cartridge mangler. The feed lips on the mag slice and dice the brass, and if your not careful, the bullet or your thumb during loading. The bottom of the bolt dings the case and bullet pretty hard, and the feeding angle allows the cartridge to slam into the bottom edge of the chamber rim before bouncing up and in.
I field stripped the rifle at the club, wiped out most of the gunk, did the once over with a toothbrush, then reassembled. When cycled the action felt loads smoother, this without applying any abrasives thus far, just a normal wear in.
No parts appear to be taking a battering, and the trigger was more than manageable.
Somethings I forgot to mention earlier in my review, so's I'll edit it again ^
 

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Mine was a cartridge mangler too...

My 511 was a cartridge mangler too until I "broke" the edge of the chamber rim at the top of the feed ramp. I had some catostrophic jams that would actually bend the cartridge before I took action. My rifle is very accurate with CCI mini-mags and has a very definite preference for this brand. I have never seen another set up like the 511 with the feed ramp at the top of the chamber rather than at the bottom. The way the bullet tip bounces off the ramp the sharp chamber edge would consistently trap the tip until I took just a whisker of metal off.

When you disassemble the mag take careful note of how the spring is oriented. The "high side" of the spring goes to the back of the follower much like the mag spring set up on the ak-47. Most mag springs have the high side of the spring going to the front of the follower.

Mine is marked '98 and I bought it brand new in December of '03. I talked with Mike Eagleshield about my jamming problem and he said the problem with jamming was the reason CZ discontinued the model shortly after 1998. When I saw they were being imported again I was hopeful that they had solved the problem. It is truly a unique rifle. I have a love-hate relationship with mine.

Sam Morgan
 

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You've got it exactly right when you said "love hate relationship". I had a late eighties model and that's exactly how I felt about mine. I loved the way it looked, felt and shot, but I hated the jamming issue I had with it. I've been very tempted to buy a new one (hoping they addressed this problem), but now I am not so optimistic after reading Warren's write up. I guess I'll wait and see.

Ross B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got out to the club last Sunday to play a bit, and ran about another 150 rnds through the 511. Still functions fine with no stoppages, even on mixed loads.
Can't wait to scope it, to test a theory. Seems that as you shoot it, the zero climbs (heat?). Groups with open irons are running 2-2.5" with verticle stringing.
Interesting shift by the way:
In my first function tests, Dynapoints were giving the worst groups by far. This time out they were just getting tighter the more I shot, even though I was jumping from brand to brand. One group of 9 shots (yep, I can squeeze 9 in the factory mag) was about 1.25", definate possibilities if we can keep tightening this up.
Still mangling the crap outta the rounds, gotta find a magazine to tinker with ;)
A note from Mike Eagleshield (CZ Gunsmith) mentioned he was unawares of any design changes in this model in the last 10 years.
Fun little rifle
:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Shot an informal CMP Rimfiresporter Rifle match yesterday after our regularly scheduled event. Scored similar to other iron sighted rifles I've used with no failures. I've had a brick of Federal Champions roasting in the back of my car for a few months, so I decided what better way to get rid of 'em than a 500 rnd "mini torture/function test". Cleaning with a pull through (2 wet / 1 dry) after every 50 rounds, the only malfunctions were when I would accidently cram 9 rounds in the 8 round magazine. After loading the magazine some 60 times (had to start wearing a glove after the first 2 boxes, that rascals sharp!), my fingers were slam worn out, but I was impressed with both the reliability of the rounds, as well as the 511. I then fired 10 rounds of Dynapoints (plinking at a can/seasoning the bore) followed by 10 rounds on paper (50 yds) to test group size:
1-3/8" not bad for open iron sights, with tired eyes and fingers.
I'll do a complete tear down looking for wear, and report later.
Gotta test this toy with a scope :t
 

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obx22 said:
Well the local dealer got two of these in last monday, so's I took a critical look in the safe and parted with a toy I didn't use. Went in yesterday and picked her up, then got tied up with life and wasn't able to get to my tear down till later in the day when I was in poor spirits.
That turned out to be good luck cause this little gem put a grin on my face, yeppers!
First, a lil clarity: The 511 is the CZ autoloader with a one piece stock, and is currently chambered in .22lr only. The two piece stock model you may see around is the BRNO 611 and is chambered in .22Mag only (at this time). Since I heard BRNO went under last Tuesday, I guess prices will soar on these rifles.
Now back to the subject at hand. I thumbed threw the manual to check for any particulars on disassembly, and something caught my eye: They mention there being only two models (Standard with flat finish and uncheckered hardwood stock, Lux with checkered walnut stock), yet a paragraph later they mention a subsonic model??? The pics also show a threaded muzzle with knurled cap.
Ok, so, mine has a front sight which appears identical to that on the sight equiped bolt models. Its adjustable for elevation and equipped with a set screw to retain adjustment. The front sight has a sun roof, dunno why?
This sight assembly appears to be made on a tube, which is then mated over a turned down portion of the barrel, don't know how its retained but they took some time polishing to blend it in.
The rear in adjustable for windage by drifting in its dovetail, and is a flip type 90 degree block whick is calibrated to 50 and 100 meters.
The receiver is quite short, and polished well with darn few tool marks visible. The dovetail on top has a small slot on one side at the rear, guess for an aperature sight. Just for giggles I threw on a Browning T-bolt peep but unfortunately its too blessed tall to sight in (sigh).
Dry firing with the bolt slightly retracted revealed she's hammer fired, and my guestimated pull weight is between 4.75 and 6 lbs (my highest accurate guage only goes to 4 lbs.) The trigger is two stage with secondary travel of about 3/32"(measured at the tip) indicating loads of sear engagement.
The manual describes disassembly in interesting detail, with descriptions of where your hands and fingers are to be (but without pics its about as complicated as writing how to tie your shoes ;) ).
First, start with an unloaded rifle!
Essentially, unscrew the slotted thumb screw on the left rear of the receiver, it will slide out only about 1/4". Then carefully, and with great control, pivot the receiver/trigger group upwards into the stocks inletting till you see the forward part of the bolt assembly (big square steel assembly under the barrel) just clear the top inletting. Then slide the metalwork forward about a 1/4" till the hook at the forend tip clears its retainer. The whole metal work then comes upwards clear of the inletting.
Wow, theres assembly methods from all the best manufacturers out there! The trigger group is a subassembly ala 10/22, but retained by a push button release. The housing is made the same way Ruger makes the MkII gripframe (folded and welded, polished). The bolt assembly reminds me of some of the 10/22-.22mag conversions I saw in the early '80s, or the telescoping bolt from a Mac 11. There is the section in the receiver, which runs on a single roller bearing, and then a lot of mass under and forward of the receiver, which rides a track machined in the bottom of the barrel. A large spring guide allows lots of bolt control/alignment, and should be quite easy to add a buffer if needed.
I was as impressed with the quality and execution of this design as when I first disassembled the bolt from a 452, I just stood there and shook my head in amazement. Tolerances are TIGHT, and I can understand where some have described it having a rough feel when cycling, thers a lot of protectant to be cleaned!
I disassembled and soaked the whole metalwork with combustion chamber cleaner. Trust me, everyone has mentioned the "brown" coming from the bore? Its all over the outside too, and takes a bit of repeated soaking and wiping to remove. I then coated all metal bearing surfaces with a mix of Corrosion-X and Moly paste. I went into this initial cleaning expecting to find a burr or two, nope, all clean and smooth.
The stock is finished to a semi gloss with pores nearly filled to the surface, the hand checkering is uh, less than perfect, but functional. One of the most striking things about this rifles construction, is the utter lack of plastic in its functional parts. The buttplate is it. The balance is blued steel and walnut!
When in the shop, I thought the rifle appeared smallish, guess its due to the receiver being so short, yet in the hands she is lively and fast pointing, the sight picture clear and crisp.
Can't forget the sling swivels which came on this stock, an eyepleasing affair, its interesting that their design prevents them from slapping the stock and marring the finish. While not quick/disconnect, they are of a style that suits this rifle.
The proofs in the shooting folks, and I'm dying to get to the club. I'll be documenting all rounds fired, as my intention is to use this rifle in CMP rimfire sporter rifle competition. The included test target shows 3 rounds in a perfect triangle, slightly high and right of center, and only 3/8" CTC.
Range report to follow.
Take care,
warren
Edited to add:
Forgot to mention, the stock is completely finished(even the inletting), the checkering was apparently cut prior to finishing (unlike the 452's I've owned).
There is a steel retaining block attached through the pistol grip area that is what the receiver ends up attached to with the cross bolt when assembled.
The forend hook on the bottom of the barrel engages an adjustable steel tongue inletted into the forend tip. This means the gun won't be able to "shoot loose" and may prove a means to "tune" barrel/action harmonics.

Good grief, I keep thinking of more stuff to add:
The magazine is completely different from anything else I've seen. Straight stack, all steel (yeah even the follower) and appears to be a quality unit. It has a similar width to the Zom 451's, much shorter front to rear than a Cz452.
Also, for folks like me who disliked the trigger and bottom metal on the 452, the 511 hold a work of art, serrated trigger face and what appears to be all machined steel guard! The crossbolt safety is intuitive, easy, and quite positive, very similar feel to the Ruger 10/22.


Ahhh, yet a bit more to add.
The extractor on this little jewell is gonna surprise ya, think Colt 1911! She's tuned, the tip is shaped for performance! The lead edge is curved to allow the case to slide up past it, then the face is reversed to retain the case rim.
The chamber does not engrave, but is quite snug in diameter. The firing pin protrusion is nearly exactly to the face of the bolt, its tip is well shaped and strikes the case heads in the same place each time (no BB trick needed here ;) ).
Sadly, there is no provision for a bolt hold-open, not something you'd expect if you grew up without 'em, but in competition shooting its an added perk (for safety). It also makes cleaning a bit easier, but is just a little inconvenience.
systemRed :) :) :) :) :) :) /b Lokking
 
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