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Are there any guide lines to finding the correct length of pull for your body size/arm length? I am currently in the process of bondoing...is that a word?... a CZ Varmint stock into something more tactical. My method of checking the length of a stock is to grip the rifle in my trigger hand with my palm up, I then take note of how close the butt plate is to my bicep. My arms are pretty long so most factory rifles feel too short unless I have on a winter coat. I'm just curious if any of you have a favorite method you would like to share for fitting a stock? Thanks in advance for any replies.
 

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I may well be off base here, but I thought I read years ago, that the way to figure length of pull was to bend your arm at the elbow and then measure from your trigger finger (as if it was pulling the trigger) to the bend at your elbow.
 

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Swede --
That works great for shotguns but I think rifle stocks are a tad shorter--maybe a half inch shorter, for shooting from different positions? If you're building you're own to suit you, just do what feels comfortable for you. My shotguns are an inch longer--most of the rifles I've restocked are a half inch longer.
 

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A pretty good estimator for appropriate length of pull (distance from trigger to rear of stock) is to divide your height in inches by 5.


If you are the average height of 5'10" that equals 70 inches. Divided that by 5 and you get a length of pull of 14 " which is what most over-the-counter modern man-sized guns come from the factory with.

BTW that is the same distance that you will get if you measure the distance from the interior crook of your bent elbow to the first joint on your index finger. Hold your forearm parallel with the floor, elbow at your side, palm facing up with your fingers extended. Lay a yardstick on your arm with the end pressed firmly against the bicep tendon where it meets the inside of the elbow joint. The calculated number will be at the first knuckle of the index finger. Funny how proportionally identical we human beings are.
 

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Here's a handy tool that an "old time" gunsmith taught me to make:

1. Get a cheap wooden yardstick
2. Attach a block of wood about the size of your typical buttplate to one end (glue, clamp on, whatever) so that it makes an "L"
3. Use a spring-type clothespin for the trigger
4. Shoulder your "gun" and determine the best position for the trigger
5. Measure the distance between the end of the "buttplate" and the "trigger" and you have your recommended length of pull

The guy who showed me this has been building custom stocks for about 50 years and fitting recoil pads to factory guns. He says it's accurate within a quarter of an inch. His is made on a yardstick that he got free from an Ace hardware store years ago. The numbers are so worn down that he's gone over them with a felt marker!

Bill
 

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As to the pull length, there's also another aspect: the presence (or lack) of the pistol grip and the angle it takes. Perhaps a non-pistol grip stock might be usefully longer than an extreme pistol grip due to the position of the hand.

I realize I'm splitting hairs here - there's less than a quarter of an inch difference, and I suspect some folks might not notice that difference. I found I was a little more comfortable with a slightly longer stock in my Beretta O/U (slight pistol grip) than my Winchester SX-1 (more pistol grip).

Jaywalker
 
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