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I have finally joined a local range after building my first Ultimate and went Saturday and Sunday shooting. I went through a bulk (550 rds) of ammo and plan to do the same if not more this weekend.

I clean my guns after every time I shoot, but my question is when I cleaned my 10/22 the last two times or should I say first two times. All I did was run my boresnake through the barrel and wipe all the exposed parts down with oil.

How often would you recommend I do a full tear down and cleaning?

Thanks
 

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I personaly do a full tear down of the rifle. I clean every part of the rifle, but i dont mess with the trigger parts. I will remove the lower trigger assembly, blow it out and clean it, but i wont take the parts out. It doesnt get that dirty anyways. I clean the barrel, the bolt, and all those parts, do a very light oiling and put her back together and wipe her down. Im just used to cleaning gun in this way, my dad taught me to clean your rifle after every time you use it, and to take care of them, and they will take care of you when you need it the most. And my Army expeirience of cleaning rifles is embedded in my head, i feel like im going to have a inspection of my rifle when im done, lol.
 

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^^^ Agreed.

Take a boresnake with ample solvent at the head and plenty of oil at the tail at the end and pull it through after your shooting session. At the beginning of the next shooting session, pull the boresnake through dry before firing, then repeat as above.

All I shoot is copperplated, and this works fine for me.

I've also seen 10/22s that have shot thousands of rounds without cleaning, that still function flawlessly.
 

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Also your bolt face on the 10/22, if it has tool marks it will let gas escape into the action along with carbon etc. You can send it to Randy (CPC) or try it yourself,. Set the headspace, make sure the boltface is square, no tool marks. Makes round count go way up on cleaning the action

Clint
 

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keep it clean

clint said:
Also your bolt face on the 10/22, if it has tool marks it will let gas escape into the action along with carbon etc. You can send it to Randy (CPC) or try it yourself,. Set the headspace, make sure the boltface is square, no tool marks. Makes round count go way up on cleaning the action

Clint
Dang...another reason to send my bolts to Randy :p
 

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running boar said:
Everyone has their own ideas, but I do a detail strip about once a year, other than that I use an otis system and run 1 patch with sovent followed by a couple of dry patchs every 2 to 3 hundred rounds.

BTW the M16 and its variants are a completely different animal than a 10/22, the M16 is gas operated with the gas tube running back to the bolt carrier to operate the action, also dumping carbon into the bolt and bolt carrier, and trigger assembley and everything else, basicly pooping where it eats :p which requires you to be ultra picky with its cleaning.

The 10/22 is blowback operated and does not deposit carbon into its working parts, I have seen 10/22s with thousands of rounds fired, never been cleaned since it rolled off the assembly line still putting rabbits in the pot :t
I clean my rifles and guns very thoughly. You car runs fine when its dirty as hell, but you still wash it right? Same idea for me, keep it clean and neat. And lets not get me started on cars, lol. Maybe im anal about cleaning my rifle, but i do it cuz it makes me happy to have clean freshly oiled guns.
 

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The only guns I tear down completely each time after shooting are rifles that I know shoot ammo with corrosive primers or powders.

You don't need to steam clean your engine and undercarriage every time you wash your car. :p
 

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I like to do a detailed cleaning on mine after each range that way I know I have not broken anything; however, there is a drawback and a price to be paid when you do this if you have fine tuned optics on the rifle. Everytime you pull the receiver from the stock or remove the scope from the rails you change the scope sighting it may not be much but it does change because the chances of seating the receiver back into the stock or the mounts back onto the rail the exact way each and every time is hard to say the least. On a hunting gun like mine it is no real big deal I can adjust in the field unless heaven forbid I have dropped the rifle; however, if your using a target gun and taking it to shoot it may be the difference between winning and sucking pond water. My opinion and the Military/Police marksman in me keeping an eye out for Mr. Murphy and his Laws of averages.
 

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I had a new bone stock 10/22 that was shot a lot for about 4 years and then a few times a year for another 9 years with the only cleaning being a few wet and dry patches pulled through the bore occassionally. I wish I could tell you the number of rounds, but I can only guess it was somwhere in the 8000-10000 range. Do I recommend this procedure? No, but my 'abuse' did not seem to harm the gun. It had a handful of feeding failures when new, but those went away quickly and I believe some of them were ammo related. This gun has since been modified, but none of the internal parts were replaced (except a bolt buffer) and it is still a reliable performer.

On my 10/22s now, I generally won't tear a gun down for complete cleaning until it gets around 1000-2000 rounds or quits functioning reliably. Your mileage may vary! :)
 
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