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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received my Toz 17 in the mail. It looks like a fun project gun. I expected that it would be pretty greasy but was surprised that the whole thing, stock and metal is covered in a stick,y heavy, yellow lubricant. I guess it prevents corrosion etc when shipping. What's the best way to clean this stuff off of the:

1. wood

2. barrel and receiver

I'll probably end up refinishing the stock, but for now I'll just clean off the gunk and try it out at the range. Thanks for the help.
 

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I would remove the barrelled-action from the stock and clean the barrelled-action with mineral spirits or kerosene, and use a brush, like a tooth brush or something slightly larger, to scrub off the cosmoline or whatever they have on the rifle. I use a pail with kerosene in it, a couple of inches deep, and stick the end of the rifle in the pail while I'm scrubbing it down with the brush, to help from getting things too messy. Then dry everything off with cloth or paper towels. Apply a gun oil like Breakfree CLP to the metal. Try washing the stuff off the stock with soap and water, or use the kerosene on the stock too, if the soap and water doesn't work. If the finish has been altered by the kerosene, apply some kind of wood furniture oil/wax to the stock.

If the TOZ is painted instead of blued, I would use soap and water instead of kerosene on the the barrelled-action.
 

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sisu,

I've read about that "packing grease" at other websites like AR15.com.

It's nothing special, just a petroleum based heavy grease.

Wipe the stuff off with some rags, break it down and use some good de-greaser.
 

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The kerosene or mineral spirits method mentioned by BobD is about the cheapest way to go, and both are good degreasers. Considering that kerosene is $1.39 a gallon here and degreaser runs $2.49 for a 12oz can, I always go with the kerosene.

To remove the cosmoline on a wood stock I generally use Aceton and rags, allow that to dry for several hours. Then go back over the stock with Alcohol, preferably 99% Isopropal Alcohol from the hardware store. After the IPA dries I apply use boiled linseed oil on the stock.

WARNING--- If you have a laminated or laquered finished stock you dont want to apply any of the above solvents. It will peel the laquer and cause the glue used in the lamination process to dissolve. The Chinese SKS Norinco stocks are an example.

Use good rubber gloves when using any of the above solvents, especially the acetone and IPA. Bad for the liver and central nervous system.

Regulis7
 

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Use good rubber gloves when using any of the above solvents, especially the acetone and IPA. Bad for the liver and central nervous system.
WHAAA?!? Man, where did you read that about acetone?

Back in my college organic chemistry labs, we washed EVERYTHING in acetone because it was considered "harmless", dried quickly, and left no residue. We practically bathed in the stuff. Now I see its bad for you.

Great :(
 

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Acetone

The biggest problem with acetone is that it is very flammable. It is not readily absorbed through the skin and, unless you are making a crazy margarita or bathing in it, it will not hurt your liver. It is a relitivley safe solvent.

We use it by the truckload where I work.
Kerosene on the other hand is worse. It has known carcinogenic compunds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the ideas. I ended up using some Varsal to remove the grease. It seemed to work pretty well, but when I tried to disassemble the rifle the butt end of the action did not want to seem to come out of the stock. So I was not able to do a thorough job. I took out all the bolts and screws underneath, but it just wouldn't come out. Furthermore I am not positive about how the bolt comes out. There is a cap on the back of the bolt area that seems a bit loose, but I don't want to force anything. I'm not really a handy man when it comes to mechanical stuff. My regular rifles are no problem but this style of beast is new to me. Anybody have any experience with the Toz?

As far as the previous question about the rifle it is definitely a Russian cadet tranning rifle. The butt plate says Baikal. I got it from marstar.com in Ontario and they have a picture (a bit blurry) on their website. $109.00 Canadian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK maybe I do have the attention span of a squirrel. I managed to pop the cap off the back of the bolt area. It is just a stamped metal cap held in place by dimples. I guess that's why it is inherently loose. Low and behold, underneath the cap was a wood screw through a tang at the back of the action. Truly a primitive rifle. Anyways, it allowed me to get the thing apart and clean off the rest of the grease. The trigger has a huge amount of creep but I guess that could be expected. I'll try it out this weekend and then think about refinishing the stock. The rifle was discounted because of the finish being marred in shipping. Looking forward to seeing if it can shoot.
 

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Acetone carries an HMIS of 1-4-0-X. For those who dont know the HMIS system its basically...Health=1 Flamability=4 Reactivity=0 Protection=X

In the chemical industry, the protective rating of X instructs the worker to see the supervisor concerning proper personel protective equipment.

Heres a clip from the MSDS...."SKIN: Moderate irritation and discomfort possible. Defatting of skin, redness and chemical dermatitis possible. Toxic systemic effects from absorption are possible." Link: http://www.americhemsales.com/MSDS HTMLS/4534jldu.htm

I am not trying to be a smart butt or know it all, but I work in the chemical industry and use solvents on a daily basis. Because I use my PPE at work I have gotten into the same habit when I use products at home.
 

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if there is a oil based mess to clean but need to be gentle in removing it, (such as on wood) try dawn dishwashing detergent.
also i too have had good luck with the scrubbing bubbles.
 

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Chrome said:
And to get the really tough stuff out of the stock.... Easy Off Oven Cleaner.
Yes, I have heard that oven cleaner is the SECOND step in cleaning that kind of gunk off of that kind of gun.

The FIRST step, believe it or not, was to lean the gun against a sunny wall outside, over a pile of newspapers, on a hot day; much of the gunk is supposed to kinda melt and just run off it! Never tried that, but I read it in Man at Arms magazine, so I trust it.

For less severe cases of gunk (nicotene, or old dried lubricants) I have used acetone with good results.
Always try a small, less visible area first if the gun is valuble.

Good Luck,
 

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I got 1 of these...

It came coated with only a light coating of grease, got it disassembled, tossed the metal into a pan of grain neuteral spirits, and put the stock out on the back patio in an aluminum foil pan in 90 degree sunlight for about 3 hrs. - wiped everything down with lots of paper towels and blew the spirits and the cosmogunk out of the interior of the bolt with compressed air. :cool: The stock under the gunk had been polyurethaned, over a nicely flaired piece of beechwood, so I left it - never liked the effect of BLO on beech, tends to lose the figure.
The little sporter shoots very well with the issue sights.
Headsup for those who have these little Russians : Iwas able to find extra mags at Hoosier Gunworks:t
 
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